Issue: 19031201

Tuesday, December 1, 1903
DECEMBER, 1903
2
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64
Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Articles
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97
97
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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97
97,98,99,100,101,102,103,104,105,106,107,108,109,110,111,112,113,114,115,116
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RECENT THEORIES IN REGARD TO THE DETERMINATION OF SEX.
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PROFESSOR T. H. MORGAN
IT was long believed that the sex of the embryo is determined at a relatively late stage in its development, and therefore it seemed probable that external factors must decide whether the embryo is to become a male or a female individual. Many views have been held as to what these external factors are, and from time to time hopes have been held out that it might be possible to regulate, by artificial means, the sex of the developing embryo.
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117
117,118,119,120,121,122,123,124,125,126,127,128,129,130
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THE ACADEMY OF SCIENCE OF ST. LOUIS.
A BIOGRAPHY.
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PROFESSOR WILLIAM TRELEASE
WHEN the Henry Shaw School of Botany was inaugurated as a department of Washington University in 1885 the venerable Dr. Eliot, then president of the board of directors and chancellor of the university, said that more than forty years earlier, five or six young men, of whom he was one, met together on Main Street, near Chestnut, in the office of Judge Mary P. Leduc, their object being to found an academy of science: “But,” he said, “not one of our number knew enough of science to found a primary school, except Dr. George Engelmann, who was an enthusiastic student, especially in botanical research, and who inspired us all with something of his zeal.
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article
131
131,132,133,134,135,136,137,138,139,140,141,142,143,144,145,146,147,148,149,150,151
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THE TETRAHEDRAL KITES OF DR. ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL.*
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GILBERT H. GROSVENOR
I HAVE been asked by the editor of THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY to write an article for that journal describing the tetrahedral kites of Dr. Alexander Graham Bell. I am glad to comply with his request, especially as I have had the good fortune for several summers past to watch the marvelous kites which Dr. Bell has been building in his laboratory at beautiful Baddeck, Nova Scotia.
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152
152,153,154,155,156,157,158,159,160,161,162,163,164
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HERTZIAN WAVE WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY, VII.
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DR. J. A. FLEMING
A NUMBER of more or less imperfect arrangements, having the isolation of communications for their object, have been devised or patented, which are dependent upon the use of several aerials, each supposed to be responsive only to a particular frequency; and attempts have been made to solve the problem of isolation by MM. Tommasi, Tesla, Jegon, Tissot, Ducretet and others.
PopularScience_19031201_0064_002_0005.xml
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165
165,166,167,168,169,170,171,172
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THE SALMON AND SALMON STREAMS OF ALASKA.
The Salmon of the Pacific.
The Species of Pacific Salmon.
The Quinnat Salmon.
The Red Salmon.
The Silver Salmon.
The Humpback Salmon.
The Dog Salmon.
The Trout of Alaska.
The Streams of Alaska.
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PRESIDENT DAVID STARR JORDAN
THE salmon of the Pacific differ notably as a whole from the single species called salmon (Salmo salar) in the Atlantic. Anatomically the Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus) differ from the salmon of the Atlantic (Salmo) in the greater number (14 to 20) of developed anal rays (the Atlantic salmon having 10 to 12), in the greater number of branchiostegal rays, 13 to 16, the Atlantic salmon having about 11, and in the usually larger number of pyloric cæca, 65 to 180, the Atlantic salmon having 65.
PopularScience_19031201_0064_002_0006.xml
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173
173,174,175,176
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THE STORM CENTER IN THE BALKANS.
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DR. ALLAN McLAUGHLIN
MANY students of European political conditions believe that the end of Turkey as a European power is in sight and that in the near future important events will occur in the Balkan Peninsula which will change the map of that part of Europe. The solution of the Balkan question has been confidently expected at various times during the past fifty years, but never have the signs of the times so consistently pointed toward this result as they do at the present time.
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177
177,178,179,180,181
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THE GROWTH OF RURAL POPULATION.
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FRANK T. CARLTON
IN the last decade numerous articles were written and many warnings sounded regarding the depopulation of the rural districts in the eastern and north central portions of the United States. To a person believing that the country, not the city, furnishes the ‘bone and sinew’ of the nation, a study of the census returns for 1890 provided sufficient foundation for such articles.
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182
182,183,184,185,186
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REAR-ADMIRAL G. W. MELVILLE, U.S.N., AND APPLIED SCIENCE IN CONSTRUCTION OF THE NEW FLEET.
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THE LATE PROFESSOR R. H. THURSTON
AS remarked by the editor of The Nation, the retirement of Rear-Admiral George W. Melville merits more attention than it has received. The final withdrawal of the engineer in chief of the United States Navy is an event of importance, not only as affecting the efficiency of the naval service, the value of its fleet and the usefulness of its personnel, but also, in hardly less degree, as liable to influence the progress of applied science in that essential branch of the public service.
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187
187
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SHORTER ARTICLES AND DISCUSSION.
AN UNUSUAL AURORA.
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IN the October number of the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, Mr. A. F. A. King has called attention to the remarkable display of aurora borealis on August 21 and has figured it as seen at York Harbor, Maine. I had the privilege of witnessing this aurora from Intervale, New Hampshire, and it corresponded very closely to the description given by Mr. King with a single exception, so remarkable that it seems to me worthy of note.
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188
188,189,190,191,192,193,194
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE.
ROBERT HENRY THURSTON.
INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION.
MENTAL AND MORAL HEREDITY.
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS.
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BY the death of Professor R. H. Thurston education and science suffer a serious loss. His activity was wide-reaching and entirely beneficent. As a physicist he was not the peer of Gibbs and Rowland, but his work covered such a broad field and was so large in quantity that the highest exactness could scarcely be attained.
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