Issue: 19020701

Tuesday, July 1, 1902
JULY, 1902
3
True
61
Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Articles
cover
195
195
[no value]
[no value]
THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19020701_0061_003_0001.xml
article
195
195,196,197,198,199,200,201,202,203,204,205,206,207,208,209,210,211
[no value]
[no value]
STUDIES IN THE NATURAL HISTORY OF THE SACRAMENTO SALMON.
Natural Propagation.
Artificial Propagation.
Habits of the Young.
Summer Residents.
The Adult.
Details of Migration.
Spanning and Death.
[no value]
[no value]
CLOUDSLEY RUTTER
THE following notes are derived mainly from a series of investigations carried on under the direction of the U. S. Commissioner of Fish and Fisheries, by whose permission they are here used. The Pacific salmons, the genus Oncorhynchus, of which there are five species, are very distinct from the Atlantic salmon of the genus Salmo.
PopularScience_19020701_0061_003_0002.xml
article
212
212,213,214,215,216,217,218,219,220,221
[no value]
[no value]
A MODERN STREET.
NEW YORK CITY.
[no value]
[no value]
DR. S. F. PECKHAM
A MODERN street is laid on a concrete foundation, the surface of which may consist of brick, asphalt block or sheet asphalt. It is of the greatest importance that the foundation should be properly constructed. It is true that in cities where a large area of Belgian block pavement has been already laid, sheet asphalt is often laid upon these blocks; but while streets can be made in this way, they are, when so constructed, more or less liable to criticism in several respects; but chiefly from the fact that the Belgian block, as compared with concrete, is an unstable foundation, liable to yield under unusual or excessive strain and always sure to carry the surface with it.
PopularScience_19020701_0061_003_0003.xml
article
222
222,223,224,225,226,227,228,229
[no value]
[no value]
VIEWS OF DR. RIZAL, THE FILIPINO SCHOLAR, UPON RACE DIFFERENCES.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"PROFESSOR BLUMENTRITT, the German ethnologist, was a friend of Dr. Rizal, the famous and lamented Filipino scholar and ethnologist, and after his death published an account of his life and studies in the Internationales Archiv für Ethnographie (Bd. X., Heft II.), together with his views upon the comparative intellectual endowments of the white and colored (Filipino) races.
PopularScience_19020701_0061_003_0004.xml
article
230
230,231,232,233,234,235,236,237,238,239,240
[no value]
[no value]
GOLD MINING IN KLONDIKE.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PROFESSOR HENRY A. MIERS
MY visit to Klondike took place at the end of August, 1901, at a very interesting time, and under most favorable conditions. The journey was made at the invitation of the Hon. Clifford Sifton, Canadian Minister of the Interior, and in company with Professor Coleman, of Toronto.
PopularScience_19020701_0061_003_0005.xml
article
241
241,242,243,244,245,246,247,248,249,250,251
[no value]
[no value]
A STUDY OF TWENTIETH CENTURY SUCCESS.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PROFESSOR EDWIN GRANT DEXTER
SOMEONE has said, with more or less philosophical insight, that all questions resolve themselves into three classes: those of the ‘What,’ the ‘How,’ and the ‘Why.’ In this paper it is primarily a question of the ‘How’ that is considered. How have the men and women, who in the opening year of this twentieth century are prominently in the public eye, achieved the success in their various vocations which has placed them there?
PopularScience_19020701_0061_003_0006.xml
article
252
252,253,254,255,256,257,258,259,260,261,262,263,264,265,266,267,268
[no value]
[no value]
THE PANAMA ROUTE FOR A SHIP CANAL.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PROFESSOR WILLIAM H. BURR
THE Panama route as a line of transit across the isthmus was established, as near as can be determined, between 1517 and 1520. The first settlement, at the site of the town of old Panama, six or seven miles easterly of the present city of that name, was begun in August, 1517. This was the Pacific end of the line.
PopularScience_19020701_0061_003_0007.xml
article
269
269,270,271
[no value]
[no value]
PRINCETON IN THE NATION’S SERVICE.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PRESIDENT WOODROW WILSON
I HAVE no laboratory but the world of books and men in which I live; but I am much mistaken if the scientific spirit of the age is not doing us a great disservice, working in us a certain great degeneracy. Science has bred in us a spirit of experiment and a contempt for the past.
PopularScience_19020701_0061_003_0008.xml
article
272
272,273,274,275,276,277,278,279,280,281
[no value]
[no value]
THE ANTILLEAN VOLCANOES.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DR. W J McGEE
IN all ages volcanoes have played a prominent rôle in human thought The Vulcan of classic mythology was but the head of a family of earth-gods born of the polytechnic Mediterranean mind fertilized by the “burning mountains” of continents conjoined in the Levant; and in the still lower stages of human development represented by scores of surviving tribes, Fire-Earth deities head the primitive pantheons—indeed, the Vulcanean notion seems to run back to a pristine stage in which the forerunners of living races first stole Vulcan’s torch, tamed capricious and ferocious fire even as other [to them] beasts were tamed, and thus took the initial step in that nature-conquest by which man rose above lower life.
PopularScience_19020701_0061_003_0009.xml
article
282
282
[no value]
[no value]
SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE.
ZOOLOGY.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A PLAUSIBLE explanation of the occurrence of peculiarities of structure and coloration in the males of many animals, both vertebrate and invertebrate, was first given by Darwin in his theory of sexual selection. Objections have been raised, however, to that portion of the theory which concerned ornamental peculiarities on the ground that the existence of an esthetic sense sufficiently acute to account for the minute and complex details of coloration is in many cases improbable, and from time to time other theories have been advanced which sought to avoid this difficulty.
PopularScience_19020701_0061_003_0010.xml
article
283
283,284,285,286,287,288,289,290
[no value]
[no value]
THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE.
THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION.
PRESIDENT ASAPH HALL.
AN AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY.
THE ROYAL SOCIETY’S CONVERSAZIONE.
PRINCETON UNIVERSITY.
THE ABUSE OF ALCOHOLIC TEACHING.
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE American Association for the Advancement of Science will hold its fifty-first annual meeting at Pittsburgh, beginning with a session of the council on June 28 and with the first regular session of the Association on June 30. The time and place of meeting seem to be favorable to a large attendance and a good program.
PopularScience_19020701_0061_003_0011.xml