Issue: 19020401

Tuesday, April 1, 1902
APRIL, 1902
6
True
60
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Articles
cover
481
481
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19020401_0060_006_0001.xml
article
481
481,482,483,484,485,486,487,488,489,490,491,492,493,494
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IS THIS A DEGENERATE AGE?
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PROFESSOR J. J. STEVENSON
TOO many writers and speakers, in discussing the intellectual and social conditions of our time, find little of good and a superabundance of bad. Everywhere they discover evidence of individual and social degeneracy. The love of literature and of pure science is disappearing; college training is debased in that the purely intellectual side is neglected for the practical; everything is dominated by an intense commercialism, which destroys men’s finer instincts and lowers the general moral tone of the community.
PopularScience_19020401_0060_006_0002.xml
article
495
495,496,497,498,499,500,501,502
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THE FORMATION AND MOTIONS OF CLOUDS.
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PROFESSOR FRANK H. BIGELOW
THE most beautiful objects in the sky are clouds, and their daily procession from west to east in northern latitudes forms a moving tableau of living pictures for those who have eyes to see. The glories of the sunrise and sunset, decking the fading stars of the morning and the waxing lights of the evening with the pure colors of the spectrum, elevate the heart of man to a loftier adoration for the marvels of nature, than any works of art prepared by his own hand.
PopularScience_19020401_0060_006_0003.xml
article
503
503,504,505,506,507,508,509,510,511,512
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO BIOLOGY FROM INVESTIGATIONS ON THE BREEDING SALMON.
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YANDELL HENDERSON
IN science as in history, it often happens that facts bare and dry in themselves are infused with a sympathetic human interest, when viewed as events in the lives of men. Such an interest, focused in a single devoted investigator, and intensified by the pathos of his death, attaches to the name of Friedrich Miescher, late professor of physiology in Basel.
PopularScience_19020401_0060_006_0004.xml
article
513
513,514,515,516,517,518,519,520
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WHAT IS PHILOSOPHY?
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PROFESSOR FRANK THILLY
DURING the first third of the past century the intelligence of the world honored philosophy as the Queen of Science. In Germany, the capital of higher learning, students crowded into the lecture-rooms of the philosophers and accepted their teachings as gospel truths.
PopularScience_19020401_0060_006_0005.xml
article
521
521,522,523,524,525,526,527,528
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A STUDY OF CALMS.
TABLE SHOWING PREVALENCE DURING CALMS OF PHENOMENA STUDIED.—ONE HUNDRED PER CENT. EQUALS THE NORMAL OR EXPECTED NUMBER.
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PROFESSOR EDWIN GRANT DEXTER
AMONG the suggestive things which have been noted in the course of a series of studies which I have made in an attempt to discover the influence of the weather upon human conduct, no one has been more interesting or unexpected than the seeming effects of calms.
PopularScience_19020401_0060_006_0006.xml
article
529
529,530,531,532,533,534,535,536,537,538
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OUR FOREIGN COMMERCE IN 1901.
Advances in Austria-Hungary.
Still Leading in Germany.
Supplying Europe with Goods we used to Import.
Decline in Exports of Manufactures.
Has Expansion been checked?
An English View of American Competition.
Our Industrial Efficiency Undiminished.
Alleged Obstruction by British Labor.
American Workingmen promoting Expansion.
Competitive Energy but partly developed.
Necessary Aids to Future Growth.
Increasing Popular Interest in Foreign Trade.
Conditions in Undeveloped Markets.
Commercial Work of Consular Officers.
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FREDERIC EMORV
THE commercial reports of diplomatic and consular officers for the calendar year 1901 record continued growth in the sales of many lines of manufactures from the United States in foreign markets and the increase of the general concern in Europe as to the possible results of our industrial competition.
PopularScience_19020401_0060_006_0007.xml
article
539
539,540,541,542,543,544,545,546,547,548,549,550
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THE SOIL AS AN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL FACTOR.
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FRANK K. CAMERON
THERE is no part of the material world about us that is more intimately connected with the general welfare of the people than the soil. It has often been said, and well said, that it is the foundation of agriculture, in more senses than one. And the importance of agriculture in our present social systems is too well understood to justify any further comment here.
PopularScience_19020401_0060_006_0008.xml
article
551
551,552,553,554,555
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THE DRAINING OF THE ZUIDER SEA.
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PROFESSOR J. H. GORE
'GOD made the world, but the Dutch made Holland’ is a saying quite common with people who visit the Netherlands; and as one looks upon the great sea dykes that keep the North Sea from sweeping over North Holland or the smaller dykes that hold the rivers within their channels, it is easy to see that the retention of the land created is possible only with great vigilance and care.
PopularScience_19020401_0060_006_0009.xml
article
556
556,557,558,559,560,561,562,563,564
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THE EVOLUTION OF FISHES.
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PRESIDENT DAVID STARR JORDAN
WHEN a fish dies he leaves no friends. His body is at once attacked by hundreds of creatures ranging from the one-celled protozoa and bacteria to individuals of his own species. His flesh is devoured, his bones are scattered, the gelatinous substance in them decays, and the phosphate of lime is in time dissolved in the water.
PopularScience_19020401_0060_006_0010.xml
article
565
565,566,567
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SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE.
BIOGRAPHIES OF EMINENT CHEMISTS.
MOSQUITOES.
MECHANICS.
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THE literature of chemistry has recently been enriched by several biographies of chemists and by carefully edited works reproducing the letters that passed between certain chemists; the importance and value of these volumes is enhanced by the reflection that the history of the lives of the leading men in a growing science constitutes the most complete history of the science in that period during which they labored, and their lives and labors are reflected in their letters.
PopularScience_19020401_0060_006_0011.xml
article
568
568,569,570,571,572
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THE PEOGEESS OF SCIENCE.
THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY.
THE NATIONAL MUSEUM.
A NEW BRITISH ACADEMY.
THE GERMICIDAL ACTION OF THE ORGANIC PEROXIDES.
TWILIGHT IN THE TROPICS.
A GENUS OF GREAT ANTIQUITY.
SCIENTIFIC ITEMS.
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ON February 21 and 22 the Johns Hopkins University celebrated the twenty-fifth anniversary of its founding and the installation of its second president. In Europe, where the life of a university is measured by centuries, it may be looked on as a sign of crudeness for us to celebrate the tenth or the twenty-fifth anniversary of the establishment of a university.
PopularScience_19020401_0060_006_0012.xml
article
573
573,574,575,576,577,578
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INDEX.
THE NAMES OF CONTRIBUTORS ARE PRINTED IN SMALL CAPITALS.
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Acid, Sulfuric, Manufacture of, 479. AGASSIZ, LOUIS, and T. H. HUXLEY, EDINBURGH REVIEWER, ASA GRAY, On the Reception of the Origin of Species, 181. Agricultural Yearbook, 185. Agriculture, Work of Department of, 285. Alaska, Harriman Expedition of 1900, 281.
PopularScience_19020401_0060_006_0013.xml