Issue: 19010701

Monday, July 1, 1901
JULY, 1901
03
True
59
Saturday, October 18, 2014

Articles
cover
223
223,224,225
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19010701_0059_003_0001.xml
article
225
225,226,227,228,229,230,231,232,233,234,235,236,237,238,239,240,241
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THE TRANSMISSION OF YELLOW FEVER BY MOSQUITOES.
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GEORGE M. STERNBERG
THE discoveries which have been made during the past twenty-five years with reference to the etiology of infectious diseases constitute the greatest achievement of scientific medicine and afford a substantial basis for the application of intelligent measures of prophylaxis.
PopularScience_19010701_0059_003_0002.xml
article
242
242,243,244,245,246,247,248,249,250,251,252,253,254,255,256
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CLIMATE AND CARBONIC ACID.
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BAILEY WILLIS
THE fact that a very extensive and massive ice sheet covered countries of the northern hemisphere which now enjoy a mild climate is generally known and accepted, although it is little more than fifty years since Agassiz (1840-47) made the then novel suggestion to explain the occurrence of glacial deposits where no glaciers remain.
PopularScience_19010701_0059_003_0003.xml
article
257
257,258,259,260,261,262,263,264,265
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THE PEOPLING OF THE PHILIPPINES.
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PROFESSOR RUD. VIRCHOW
SINCE the days when the first European navigators entered the South Sea, the dispute over the source and ethnic affiliations of the inhabitants of that extended and scattered island world has been unsettled. The most superficial glance points out a contrariety in external appearances, which leaves little doubt that here peoples of entirely different blood live near and among one another.
PopularScience_19010701_0059_003_0004.xml
article
266
266,267,268,269,270,271,272
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A STUDY OF BRITISH GENIUS.
VIII.—PATHOLOGY.
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HAVELOCK ELLIS
IN a large proportion of cases no reference is made by the national biographers to the diseases from which their subjects suffered, nor to the general state of health. This, however, we could scarcely expect to find, except in those cases in which the state of health had an obvious influence on the life and work of the eminent person.
PopularScience_19010701_0059_003_0005.xml
article
273
273,274,275,276,277,278,279
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THE INTELLIGENCE OF MONKEYS.
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PROFESSOR EDWARD L. THORNDIKE
A GOOD test of the intelligence of any animal is its ability to learn to do a thing by being shown it or by being put through the requisite movements. Human adults would learn readily in either of these ways, because we thus get ideas of what to do and how to do it and modify our actions in accordance with these ideas.
PopularScience_19010701_0059_003_0006.xml
article
280
280,281,282,283
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COCAINE ANALGESIA OF THE SPINAL CORD.
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SMITH ELY JELLIFFE
THERE are surgeons living to-day who remember the fascination and horrors of necessary operations, when speed was as great a requisite as skill to shorten the mortal agony, and when a famous surgeon would remove a limb in eleven minutes. There are many who remember how slowly the boon of chloroform worked its way against prejudice.
PopularScience_19010701_0059_003_0007.xml
article
284
284,285,286,287,288,289
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THE EVIDENCE OF SNAILS ON CHANGES OF LAND AND SEA.
1. DART APPARATUS OF EPIPHRAGMOPHORA MORMONUM, A CALIFORNIAN SNAIL. 2. THE DART, ENLARGED. 3. DO. OF CHLORÆA BENGUETENSIS, PHILLIPPINES. THE POSITION OF THE DART IN ITS SACK IS SHOWN BY DOTTED LINES.
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HENRY A. PILSBRY
IF we wish to learn the history of any land area, we turn to its geology for a record of changes in the past. The time of its emergence from ocean, the age of its mountains and the details of its growth by successive increments of land elevated from the sea, all this we may expect to learn with reasonable accuracy, besides gaining a knowledge of the plants and animals which lived from time to time upon the coasts.
PopularScience_19010701_0059_003_0008.xml
article
290
290,291,292,293,294,295,296,297,298,299,300,301,302,303,304
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THE BLUE HILL METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATORY.
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FRANK WALDO
METEOROLOGY became established on an independent basis about fifty years ago. With the beginning of a systematic study of the atmospheric conditions there arose a demand for more frequent observations than could be made directly, and, as a result, self-registering meteorological instruments came into use.
PopularScience_19010701_0059_003_0009.xml
article
305
305,306,307,308,309,310,311,312,313,314
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THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE.
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A NATIONAL association for the advancement of science occupies at the beginning of the twentieth century a dominant position. The greatest achievement of the nineteenth century was the progress of science; its most definite tendency was towards the voluntary organization of individuals for the accomplishment of certain ends.
PopularScience_19010701_0059_003_0010.xml
article
315
315,316
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SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE.
A. HISTORY OF THE THERMOMETER.
EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY.
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DR. H. CARRINGTON BOLTON is one of the few Americans acquainted with the history of science, and his little volume on the evolution of the thermometer (The Chemical Publishing Company) represents a type of publication too rare in this country.
PopularScience_19010701_0059_003_0011.xml
article
317
317,318,319,320
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE.
THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY AND PRESIDENT REMSEN.
ACADEMIC FREEDOM HERE AND ABROAD.
SCIENTIFIC AND EDUCATIONAL ENDOWMENTS.
THE CAUSES OF YELLOW FEVER AND OF CANCER.
THE BRITISH ANTARCTIC EXPEDITION.
SCIENTIFIC NEWS.
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THE election of Professor Ira Remsen to the presidency of the Johns Hopkins University has been received with general approval, and will be particularly gratifying to those who have been connected with the University as students or teachers and to men of science throughout the country.
PopularScience_19010701_0059_003_0012.xml