Issue: 19010301

Friday, March 1, 1901
MARCH, 1901
5
True
58
Saturday, November 29, 2014

Articles
cover
449
449
[no value]
[no value]
THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19010301_0058_005_0001.xml
article
449
449,450,451,452,453,454,455,456,457,458,459,460,461,462,463,464,465,466
[no value]
[no value]
CHAPTERS ON THE STARS.
STATISTICAL STUDIES OF PROPER MOTIONS.
THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE STARS IN SPACE.
[no value]
[no value]
PROFESSOR SIMON NEWCOMB
The number of stars now found to have a proper motion is sufficiently great to apply a statistical method to their study. Several important steps in this study have been taken by Kapteyn, who, in several papers published during the past ten years, has shown how conclusions of a striking character may be drawn in this way.
PopularScience_19010301_0058_005_0002.xml
article
467
467,468,469,470,471,472,473,474,475,476,477,478,479
[no value]
[no value]
THE LAW OF SUBSTANCE.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PROFESSOR R. H. THURSTON
IN Haeckel’s new and remarkable monistic book, ‘The Riddle of the Universe at the Close of the Nineteenth Century,’ which has just been translated by Joseph McCabe and published by the Harpers, the accepted laws of the persistence of matter and the persistence of energy are enunciated and their unity insisted upon; the union constituting what is denominated ‘The Law of Substance.’
PopularScience_19010301_0058_005_0003.xml
article
480
480,481,482,483,484,485,486,487,488,489,490,491,492
[no value]
[no value]
THE HEIGHT AND WEIGHT OF THE CUBAN TEACHERS, WITH COMMENTS ON THEIR PHYSICAL STATUS COMPARED WITH THE AMERICANS.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DR. DUDLEY ALLEN SARGENT
WHEN the Cuban teachers were in Cambridge last summer, it was commonly observed that they seemed to be smaller in size and stature than our own American teachers and students. This impression was undoubtedly favored by the peculiar manner in which some of the Cubans wore their clothing. Many of the men had their coats cut in at the waist, and wore them tightly buttoned about the waist and chest, while the trousers were large and full, especially at the knee.
PopularScience_19010301_0058_005_0004.xml
article
493
493,494,495,496,497,498,499,500,501,502,503,504
[no value]
[no value]
THROWING A HIGH EXPLOSIVE FROM POWDER GUNS.
THE GATHMANN GUN.
MAXIMITE.
CURIOUS PROPERTIES OF MAXIMITE.
VALUE OF HIGH EXPLOSIVES IN A ARMOR-PIERCING SHELLS.
[no value]
[no value]
HUDSON MAXIM
THERE is now at Sandy Hook a battery of pneumatic torpedo guns, and another at the port of San Francisco, the largest of which have a caliber of fifteen inches and are capable of throwing a maximum charge of 500 pounds of nitro-gelatin about a mile.
PopularScience_19010301_0058_005_0005.xml
article
505
505,506,507,508,509,510,511,512,513,514
[no value]
[no value]
PYRAMID LAKE, NEVADA.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HAROLD W. FAIRBANKS
NOT much more than fifty years ago the Great Basin region, lying between the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevadas, was almost unknown. Previous to 1840, a few daring men had penetrated west of the Rocky Mountains. The route to Oregon had been traversed, and one party had crossed the southern portion of the Great Basin, but the main portion was unexplored.
PopularScience_19010301_0058_005_0006.xml
article
515
515,516,517,518
[no value]
[no value]
THE GEOLOGIST AWHEEL.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PROFESSOR WILLIAM H. HOBBS
IN no country of the world does the government distribute to its people with so lavish a hand as in our own the published results of scientific investigation. One example among many that might be given is furnished by the reports of the United States Geological Survey, which for abundance of material, for scientific value and for beauty of illustration are not approached by the geological publications of any European state.
PopularScience_19010301_0058_005_0007.xml
article
519
519,520,521,522,523,524,525
[no value]
[no value]
THE FORMATION OF HABITS IN THE TURTLE.*
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ROBERT MEARNS YERKES
HABITS are determinants in human life. It is true that we are free, within limits, to form them; it is also true that, once formed, they mold our lives. In the life of the brute habit plays an even more important rôle than it does in man. The ability to survive, for example, frequently depends upon the readiness with which new feeding habits can be formed.
PopularScience_19010301_0058_005_0008.xml
article
526
526,527,528,529,530,531,532,533,534,535,536,537,538,539
[no value]
[no value]
THE SCIENCE OF DISTANCES.*
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SIR GEORGE S. ROBERTSON
WHEN the British Association for the Advancement of Science honored me with an invitation to preside over this Section, I accepted the distinction, thoughtfully and with sincere gratification. The selection as your president at Bradford, this great and interesting center of commercial energy, of a student of political movements who was also deeply interested in the science of geography, seemed to point suggestively to a particular branch of our subject as appropriate for an opening address.
PopularScience_19010301_0058_005_0009.xml
article
540
540,541,542,543,544,545,546,547
[no value]
[no value]
A STUDY OF BRITISH GENIUS.
II. NATIONALITY AND RACE.
III. SOCIAL CLASS.
[no value]
[no value]
HAVELOCK ELLIS
IT is scarcely necessary to remark that nationality and race, when used as distinguishing marks of people who all belong to the British Islands, are not identical terms and are both vague. The races—however we may describe them*—constituting the people of Great Britain are to he found in all the main divisions of the two islands, and the fact that a man is English or Scotch or Irish tells us nothing positive as to his race.
PopularScience_19010301_0058_005_0010.xml
article
548
548,549,550,551
[no value]
[no value]
DISCUSSION AND CORRESPONDENCE.
RANDOM REMARKS OF A LADY SCIENTIST.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE.
THE INVENTOR OF THE SEWING MACHINE.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
To the Editor: I am a lady scientist, and I suppose you will think it very rude in me to intrude what I think into the grand affairs of a great scientific magazine. But I really must say to you that it is very shameful of you to encourage Mr. Starr Jordan to indulge his fiendish delight in depreciating feminine science—Karyokinesis.
PopularScience_19010301_0058_005_0011.xml
article
552
552,553,554
[no value]
[no value]
SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE.
THE FOUNDATIONS OF KNOWLEDGE.
STATIONARY RADIANTS TO SHOWERS OF SHOOTING STARS.
THE UTILIZATION OF FOOD AND ALCOHOL IN THE HUMAN BODY.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LITTLE doubt can exist longer that the coolness which marked the relationship between Science and Philosophy from about 1840 until within the last decade is passing away rapidly. Thanks partly to the development of experimental psychology, partly to the broader training given at our colleges, where science has won a recognized place in the undergraduate course, the younger men who specialize in philosophy possess some acquaintance with the scientific attitude and temper.
PopularScience_19010301_0058_005_0012.xml
article
555
555,556,557,558,559,560,561,562
[no value]
[no value]
THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN the numerous reviews of the nineteenth century published in the magazines and in the daily press, science occupies the most prominent place. The news of the world for a day, as we read it in the newspaper, or for a month, as given in certain journals, may contain no reference to science, yet the contemporary events which at the time excite such general interest are forgotten, while the quiet progress of science gradually emerges in its true proportions.
PopularScience_19010301_0058_005_0013.xml