Issue: 19010201

Friday, February 1, 1901
FEBRUARY, 1901
4
True
58
Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Articles
cover
337
337
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_19010201_0058_004_0001.xml
article
337
337,338,339,340,341,342,343,344,345,346,347,348,349,350,351,352,353,354,355,356,357,358,359
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HUXLEY'S LIFE AND WORK.*
SCIENTIFIC WORK.
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RIGHT HONORABLE LORD AVEBURY
I ACCEPTED with pleasure the invitation of your Council to deliver the first Huxley lecture, not only on account of my affection and admiration for him and my long friendship, but it seemed also especially appropriate as I was associated with him in the foundation of this Society.
PopularScience_19010201_0058_004_0002.xml
article
360
360,361,362,363,364,365,366,367,368,369,370,371
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MALARIA.*
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GEO. M. STERNBERG
IN my address as president of the Biological Society, in 1896, the subject chosen was 'The Malarial Parasite and other Pathogenic Protozoa.' This address was published in March, 1897, in the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTLHY, and I must refer you to this illustrated paper for a detailed account of the morphological characters of the malarial parasite.
PopularScience_19010201_0058_004_0003.xml
article
372
372,373,374,375,376,377,378,379,380
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A STUDY OF BRITISH GENIUS.
1. INTRODUCTORY.
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HAVELOCK ELLIS
UNTIL now it has not been possible to obtain any comprehensive view of the men and women who have chiefly built up English civilization. It has not, therefore, been possible to study their personal characteristics as a group. The sixty-three volumes of the 'Dictionary of National Biography,' of which the last has been lately issued, have for the first time enabled us to construct an authoritative and wellbalanced scheme of the persons of illustrious genius, in every department, who have appeared in the British Isles from the beginning of history down to the end of the nineteenth century; and, with a certain amount of labor, it enables us to sum up their main traits.
PopularScience_19010201_0058_004_0004.xml
article
381
381,382,383,384,385,386,387,388,389,390,391,392
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THE WEATHER VS. THE NEWSPAPERS.
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HARVEY MAITLAND WATTS
"APRIL 4, 1668. I did attend the Duke of York and he did carry us to the King's lodgings; but he was asleep in his closet; so we stayed in the green-room; where the Duke of York did tell us what rule he had of knowing the weather; and did now tell us we should have rain before to-morrow (it having been a dry season for some time) and so it did rain all night almost; and pretty rules he hath, and told Brouncker and me some of them, which were such as no reason can readily be given for them."—Pepys’ Diary.
PopularScience_19010201_0058_004_0005.xml
article
393
393,394,395,396
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THE PHILIPPINES TWO HUNDRED YEARS AGO.
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PROFESSOR E. E. SLOSSON
"I NOW and then, as occasion offers, undertake to plead the cause of the Indians in the Philippine Islands, as many more have for those of America: This is tolerable because grounded on compassion, mercy and the inclination of our kings and their supreme council of the Indies, who love them as their children, and give repeated orders every day for their good, advantage, quiet, satisfaction and ease.
PopularScience_19010201_0058_004_0006.xml
article
397
397,398,399,400,401,402,403,404
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PREHISTORIC TOMBS OF EASTERN ALGERIA.
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PROFESSOR ALPHEUS S. PACKARD
FROM the wonderful hot baths at Hamman-Meskoutine, which are situated near the Tunisian border of Algeria, on the railroad leading from Constantine to Tunis, one can visit the little-known necropolis of Roknia. On a delightful morning near the last of January, with a Moorish guide, we set out for this locality.
PopularScience_19010201_0058_004_0007.xml
article
405
405,406,407,408,409,410,411,412
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THE NEW YORK AQUARIUM.
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PROFESSOR CHARLES L. BRISTOL,
WHEN the municipality of New York transformed Castle Garden from an immigrant station to a public Aquarium, its location alone solved two problems incident to the usefulness and maintenance of such an institution. Its position, at the end of the Island of Manhattan, at the confluence of two great rivers and the harbor, in close proximity to all the lines of communication with all the boroughs, makes it equally accessible to all portions of the population, and provides for an abundant supply of salt water.
PopularScience_19010201_0058_004_0008.xml
article
413
413,414,415,416,417,418,419,420,421,422,423,424,425,426,427,428
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CHAPTERS ON THE STARS.
THE CLUSTERING OF THE STARS.
THE STRUCTURE OF THE MILKY WAY.
THE INCREASING NUMBER OF STARS WITH DIMINISHING BRIGHTNESS.
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PROFESSOR SIMON NEWCOMB
A STUDY of Schiaparelli's planispheres, which we gave in the last chapter, shows that some regions of the heavens are especially rich in lucid stars and others especially poor. Neither telescope nor planisphere is necessary to show that many of those stars are collected in clusters.
PopularScience_19010201_0058_004_0009.xml
article
429
429,430,431,432,433
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A CENTURY OF THE STUDY OF METEORITES.
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DR. OLIVER C. FARRINGTON
THE close of the nineteenth century will mark the end of the first century of the study of meteorites. Up to the beginning of this century the attitude of scientific men toward the accounts of stones reported to have fallen from the sky was in general one of scorn and incredulity.
PopularScience_19010201_0058_004_0010.xml
article
434
434,435,436,437
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DISCUSSION AND CORRESPONDENCE.
A DEFENSE OF CHRISTIAN SCIENCE.
MR. TESLA'S SCIENCE.
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To the Editor: You informed me in my recent interview with you that discussions of a religious nature did not come within the scope of the purpose of your magazine. I am convinced by your fair, frank and kindly manner that you are unaware of the injustice done a large class of thinking people and many readers of your magazine by the article in question between us written by Professor Jastrow and published in the September number of the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
PopularScience_19010201_0058_004_0011.xml
article
438
438,439,440,441
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SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE.
ENGINEERING.
MYCOLOGY.
FOLK-LORE.
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AMERICAN books on surveying have heretofore been prepared primarily as texts for class use, rather than for the use of the field engineer. This point of view is reversed in the volume of 900 pages, by Herbert M. Wilson, entitled 'Topographic Surveying, including Geographic, Exploratory and Military Mapping,' recently issued by John Wiley & Sons.
PopularScience_19010201_0058_004_0012.xml
article
442
442,443,444,445,446,447,448,449,450
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE.
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CRITICISM of the Government is a cherished prerogative of a democratic people. Shortcomings that would be regarded as inevitable in the conduct of a private institution, when discovered under Government control, are apt to be the target of very free speech.
PopularScience_19010201_0058_004_0013.xml