Issue: 19001101

Thursday, November 1, 1900
NOVEMBER, 1900, TO APRIL, 1901
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Friday, November 28, 2014

Articles
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19001101_0058_001_0001.xml
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CHAPTERS ON THE STARS.
TRIPLE AND MULTIPLE SYSTEMS.
SPECTROSCOPIC BINARY SYSTEMS.
STAR-CLUSTERS.
NEBULÆ.
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PROFESSOR SIMON NEWCOMB
SIR WILLIAM HERSCHEL was the first to notice that many stars which, to the unaided vision, seemed single, were really composed of two stars in close proximity to each other. The first question to arise in such a case would he whether the proximity is real or whether it is only apparent, arising from the two stars being in the same line from our system.
PopularScience_19001101_0058_001_0002.xml
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28,29,30,31,32,33
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RAPID BATTLESHIP BUILDING.
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WALDON FAWCETT.
A VARIETY of influences, aside from the occasional exigencies of actual war conditions, have, during the past few years, combined to force upon naval architects and shipbuilders a conviction of the need for more expeditious work in the construction of war vessels, and especially of battleships.
PopularScience_19001101_0058_001_0003.xml
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34,35,36,37,38,39,40,41,42,43,44,45,46,47,48
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ADDRESS OF THE PRESIDENT BEFORE THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE.
FUNCTION OF CELLS.
NERVE CELLS.
BACTERIA.
DEVELOPMENT OF THE EGG.
GENERAL MORPHOLOGY.
DARWINIAN THEORY.
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SIR WILLIAM TURNER
IT has already been stated that, when new cells arise within pre-existing cells, division of the nucleus is associated with cleavage of the cell plasm, so that it participates in the process of new cell-formation. Undoubtedly, however, its rôle is not limited to this function.
PopularScience_19001101_0058_001_0004.xml
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49,50,51,52,53
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THE POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES DURING THE NEXT TEN CENTURIES.
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H. S. PRITCHETT
IS it possible to predict with any degree of certainty the population of a country like the United States for a hundred years to come? Doubtless the average intelligent person would say à priori that the growth of population is not a matter which can be made the subject of exact computation; that this growth is the result of many factors; and that those factors are subject to such great fluctuations that an estimate of the population a hundred years hence can be, in the nature of the case, only a rough guess.
PopularScience_19001101_0058_001_0005.xml
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54,55,56,57,58,59
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THE DISTRIBUTION OF TAXES.
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EDWARD ATKINSON.
IN nearly all the discussions upon the subject of taxation which have come to my notice, it is assumed that certain specific taxes fall upon and are borne wholly by one class; other taxes fall upon and are borne by a second class; and so on throughout the list. For instance, in the discussion regarding a protective tariff it is held by the advocates of protection that in some cases the imposition of a duty reduces the price of the imported article in the foreign country from which it comes.
PopularScience_19001101_0058_001_0006.xml
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60,61,62,63,64,65,66,67,68
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MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT NOW AND A HUNDRED YEARS AGO.
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CLINTON ROGERS WOODRUFF.
A HUNDRED years has wrought marvelous changes. The maps of Asia, Europe and America, of the world, have been changed. The United States of America has fought four wars and demonstrated her prowess on sea and land, at home and abroad. The country has grown from a handful of States strung along the Atlantic seaboard to a great and powerful nation, extending from sea to sea, conquering and subduing in its growth a mighty continent—the mightiest in its latent possibilities on the face of the globe.
PopularScience_19001101_0058_001_0007.xml
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69,70,71,72,73,74,75,76,77,78,79,80
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CHINA.
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WILLIAM BARCLAY PARSONS
EVER since the days when Marco Polo brought back to Europe the seeming fairy tales of the wonderland of the Far East, the country to which we have applied the name of China has been a field more and more attractive for commercial conquest. At the close of the nineteenth century, when the ever-rising tide of industrial development has succeeded in sweeping over Europe, America, the better portion of Africa, of Western Asia and India, it is the Chinese Wall alone that resists its waves.
PopularScience_19001101_0058_001_0008.xml
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81,82,83,84
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RESCUE WORK IN HISTORY.
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PRESIDENT DAVID STARR JORDAN
AT the November meeting of the Astral Camera Club, Mr. Asa Marvin presiding, Prof. Abram Gridley, the learned master of the Alcalde Union High School, spoke on the unique topic of his proposed ‘Rescue Work in History.' He began with the bold declaration that the two great discoveries, twin triumphs of the human mind, which will make this age memorable, were these, the Banishment of Space and the Annihilation of Time.
PopularScience_19001101_0058_001_0009.xml
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85,86,87,88,89,90,91
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JAMES EDWARD KEELER.
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PROF. W. W. CAMPBELL,
THE Lick Observatory has lost an ideal director. Astronomy has suffered a loss it can ill afford. Colleagues and friends widespread will miss a companionship which was simply delightful. James Edward Keeler was born in La Salle, Ill., on September 10, 1857.
PopularScience_19001101_0058_001_0010.xml
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92,93,94,95,96,97
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DISCUSSION AND CORRESPONDENCE.
SCIENTIFIC AND LITERARY HISTORIANS.
THE RETARDATION OF SCIENCE.
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THE address of Mr. Thomas Ford Rhodes, president of the American Historical Association, on the subject of history, delivered before the midwinter meeting of that body, and published in the ‘Atlantic Monthly’ for February, has gone forth to the world with a high degree of authority and impressiveness.
PopularScience_19001101_0058_001_0011.xml
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SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE.
CHRISTMAS ISLAND.
PALEONTOLOGY.
ZOOLOGY.
AGRICULTURE.
PHILOSOPHY.
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THOSE areas of the earth’s surface outside of the Polar regions which retain their original fauna and flora unmodified by the action of man and the organisms which accompany him in his migrations are very few and are rapidly passing away.
PopularScience_19001101_0058_001_0012.xml
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106,107,108,109,110,111,112,113,114,115
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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE.
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IT is frequently said that the days of the discovery of general principles and far-reaching laws are past, and that students of science are now settling down to minor questions and the elaboration of details. The amount of specialized work, unproductive of immediate result in general truths, is naturally increasing, both because of the assiduity of scientific workers and because each general truth brings a number of minor problems.
PopularScience_19001101_0058_001_0013.xml