Issue: 18970701

Thursday, July 1, 1897
JULY, 1897
3
True
51
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Articles
cover
288
288,289
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APPLETONS’ POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_18970701_0051_003_0001.xml
article
289
289,290,291,292,293,294,295,296,297,298,299,300,301,302,303,304,305,306,307
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THE RACIAL GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE.
A SOCIOLOGICAL STUDY.
VI.—FRANCE—THE TEUTON AND THE CELT.
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WILLIAM Z. RIPLEY
SEVERAL reasons combine to make France the most interesting country of Europe from the anthropological point of view. More is known of it in detail than of any other part of the continent save Italy. Its surface presents the greatest diversity of climate, soil, and fertility.
PopularScience_18970701_0051_003_0002.xml
article
307
307,308,309,310,311,312,313,314
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FORECASTING THE PROGRESS OF INVENTION.
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WILLIAM BAXTER
THE great progress made during the last fifty years in the domain of science and invention has aroused a very general desire among intelligent people to know what the future has in store, and in many cases the desire has become so strong as to develop prophetic tendencies.
PopularScience_18970701_0051_003_0003.xml
article
315
315,316,317,318,319,320,321,322,323,324
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SOME FACTS ABOUT WASPS AND BEES.
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DR. R. W. SHUFELDT
ONE of the most extensive and at the same time one of the most interesting groups of insects in the entire range of entomology is that order which has been created to contain the ants, bees, and wasps with their numerous allies. This association was called the Hymenoptera by Linnæus, the name having reference to the fact that the anterior and posterior wings of the winged forms are, during flight, connected together by a row, upon either side, of small hooks.
PopularScience_18970701_0051_003_0004.xml
article
324
324,325,326,327,328,329,330,331,332,333,334,335,336,337,338,339,340
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THE PRINCIPLE OF ECONOMY IN EVOLUTION.
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EDMUND NOBLE
ONE of the many interesting things about evolution, oftener taken for granted than formally recognized, is the fact that the changes which everywhere accompany and constitute it have their rise in a simple excess of pressure in one direction over the pressure in another.
PopularScience_18970701_0051_003_0005.xml
article
341
341,342,343,344,345,346,347,348
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LET US THEREWITH BE CONTENT.
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ELLEN COIT ELLIOTT
THE men of America have met the suffrage agitation with an admirable gallantry. Aspersed to their faces from the rostrum as masculine creatures of unfathomable iniquity, they return only a deprecating smile. Assured by the "new woman" that the ever feminine leadeth them on, and that politics will clarify as soon as the superior purity and integrity of the sex are brought to bear upon them, they appreciate her splendid confidence, applaud, and cry her on.
PopularScience_18970701_0051_003_0006.xml
article
348
348,349,350,351,352,353,354,355,356,357
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WILD FLOWERS OF THE CALIFORNIA ALPS.
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MISS B. F. HERRICK
THE Sierra Nevada mountain range—with its lofty, snow-capped peaks and majestic glaciers, its serrated crags and romantic canons, its foaming rivers, sparkling waterfalls, and dense pine forests—is the California Switzerland. The climate of this region more nearly resembles that of the mountains of the Atlantic coast than any other section of the far West; and the vegetation is in most respects quite similar, though there are many varieties of trees and plants that are peculiar to the State.
PopularScience_18970701_0051_003_0007.xml
article
357
357,358,359,360,361,362,363,364,365,366
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THE PLANET SATURN.
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CLIFTON A. HOWES
DOUBTLESS many observers of the sky are familiar with the planet Saturn as he slowly moves through the constellations from year to year, but how many of them stop to think of the wonders and mysteries connected with this far-off member of the solar system?
PopularScience_18970701_0051_003_0008.xml
article
367
367,368,369,370,371,372,373,374,375,376
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NORTH AND SOUTH.
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SPENCER TROTTER
A WRITER has somewhere remarked upon the different atmosphere that surrounds two well-known railway stations in the city of Baltimore. The Union Station, in the upper and newer section of the city, has about it all the life and bustle of a Northern railroad center, while at the Camden Station, for so many years the terminus of a Southern trunk line, there is an air of easy-going uncertainty that breathes of the South.
PopularScience_18970701_0051_003_0009.xml
article
377
377,378,379,380,381,382,383,384,385,386,387,388,389
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THE HISTORY OF ALCOHOL.
II.
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PROF. CHARLES ERNEST PELLEW
IT is a curious fact that, although intoxicating beverages have been known and used from time immemorial, alcohol itself was not discovered until after the fall of the Roman Empire, and, when once discovered, it was not used for intoxicating purposes for many hundred years.
PopularScience_18970701_0051_003_0010.xml
article
390
390,391,392,393,394,395,396,397,398
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THE MOB MIND.
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PROF. EDWARD A. ROSS
IN viewing social life among animals one is struck by the contagion of feeling in a herd or flock. Whatever the feeling called up, whether terror, hostility to a stranger, rage at hereditary enemies, sympathy for a stricken fellow, or the impulse to migrate, all the members of the group feel it, and feel it almost at once.
PopularScience_18970701_0051_003_0011.xml
article
398
398,399,400
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ARE SCORPIONS MATRICIDES AND SUICIDES?
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DR. JUAN VIDARO
IT is by no means a rare thing to see a simple coincidence designated and accepted as a cause. Such is the case with the erroneous though common and deep-rooted belief that the newly born scorpions devour their mother during the first period of their life.
PopularScience_18970701_0051_003_0012.xml
article
401
401,402,403,404,405,406,407,408,409,410
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SKETCH OF HORATIO HALE.
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GREAT advances have been made by ethnologists of the present generation in the study of the languages of the American aborigines and in the investigation of primitive linguistics. The pioneer in these researches, one whose efforts have been among the most fruitful, the one who perhaps has so far gone deepest into the investigation, was Horatio Hale, who died at Clinton, Ontario, December 29, 1896.
PopularScience_18970701_0051_003_0013.xml
article
411
411,412,413,414,415,416,417
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Editor's Table
THE DUKE OF ARGYLL ON EVOLUTION.
A NEW SOCIAL PROBLEM.
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THE Duke of Argyll is a writer who finds it very hard to reconcile himself to the doctrine of evolution in the only form in which it can ever prove satisfactory to the scientific world. He believes in evolution, or, as he prefers to call it, development; but he wants to have it in a shape to suit himself, with little touches of special creation thrown in here and there, to ease off the difficult places and keep in touch with older modes of thought.
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article
417
417,418,419,420
Scientific Literature
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SPECIAL BOOKS.
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AMONG the many manuals of architecture Mr. Mathews’s book* takes a distinct place. It is a concise history of architectural development through all the various phases of civilization, showing the important modifications produced, by location and national life.
PopularScience_18970701_0051_003_0015.xml
article
420
420,421,422,423,424
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GENERAL NOTICES.
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IN Telepathy and the Subliminal Self we have an attempt to put certain occult phenomena on a scientific basis.* The author, rejecting all ideas of the supernatural, approaches his subject from the point of view of a scientific observer who does not speculate with the intangible, but who has a definite theory, that shall account for certain mysterious occurrences.
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article
424
424,425
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PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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Agricultural Experiment Stations. Bulletins, Reports, etc. Cornell University: Nos. 131, 132. Plums, Celery.—Hatch, Massachusetts Agricultural College: Nos. 44-47. Tests of Fruits and Seeds, Fertilizers, the American Toad, Tobacco.
PopularScience_18970701_0051_003_0017.xml
article
425
425,426,427,428,429,430,431
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Fragments of Science.
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Dr. Ebenezer Emmons and the Olenellus. —During the geological survey of the State of New York which, commenced in 1836, was almost the first of the geological surveys that were entered upon and properly prosecuted in the United States, there was a marked difference of opinion between Prof. Ebenezer Emmons, of Williams College, who had charge of the portion of the survey that embraced the rocks of western Massachusetts and the upper waters of the Hudson, and his associate geologists, which finally terminated in a bitter personal antagonism and almost social ostracism of Dr. Emmons.
PopularScience_18970701_0051_003_0018.xml
article
431
431,432
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MINOR PARAGRAPHS.
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ACCORDING to Curator Duerden, of the Museum of the Jamaica Institute, as cited by Robert T. Hill in Science, a turn of the tide has come in the life of the mongoose in Jamaica. This animal was imported there to rid the island of rats. Having disposed of these, it turned upon the other small animals and nearly exterminated them.
PopularScience_18970701_0051_003_0019.xml
article
432
432,433
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NOTES.
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THE summer courses of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, beginning at different dates in June and generally continuing through July, are intended for the benefit of students who wish to prolong their stay in summer or to make up deficiencies, and are open to persons not students in the institute if they possess the necessary qualifications.
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