Issue: 18961201

Tuesday, December 1, 1896
DECEMBER, 1896
2
True
50
Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Articles
cover
144
144,145
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APPLETONS’ POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_18961201_0050_002_0001.xml
article
145
145,146,147,148,149,150,151,152,153,154,155,156,157,158,159,160,161,162
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PRINCIPLES OF TAXATION.
CORRESPONDANT DE L’INSTITUT DE FRANCE, ETC.
IV.—RELATION OF TAXATION TO THE STATE.
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DAVID A. WELLS
THE next step of importance in this discussion is to recognize clearly the relation which the exercise or function of taxation, as it has been defined, sustains to the state. ORIGIN AND JUSTIFICATION OF TAXATION.—The question at once suggests itself, “By what right does that entity which we call the state, whatever may be its concrete form, and whether its powers are exercised by a single man (Cæsar), by a particular class, or by a majority of citizens, take from the individual that which hitherto was absolutely his, annul his ownership, and convert the thing of value to its own use?”*
PopularScience_18961201_0050_002_0002.xml
article
163
163,164,165,166,167,168,169,170,171
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THE RELATIONS OF BIOLOGY, PSYCHOLOGY, AND SOCIOLGY.
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HERBERT SPENCER
FROM time to time proof has come to me that in the United States there have arisen erroneous conceptions of my views concerning the connections between the sciences dealing respectively with organic evolution and super-organic evolution.
PopularScience_18961201_0050_002_0003.xml
article
172
172,173,174,175,176,177,178,179,180,181,182,183,184,185,186
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BOTANIC GARDENS.
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF BOTANY IN THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA.
I.—ORIGIN AND GENERAL ORGANIZATION.
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D. T. MACDOUGAL
THE term botanic garden is used to designate a limited area of ground on which is grown a collection of plants of a large number of species, arranged in a manner that will subserve some educational, æsthetic, scientific, or economic purpose.
PopularScience_18961201_0050_002_0004.xml
article
187
187,188,189,190,191,192,193,194,195,196
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ANIMAL SYMBOLISM IN ECCLESIASTICAL ARCHITECTURE.*
EX-PRESIDENT OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY.
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ANDREW D. WHITE
PROP. EDWARD P. EVANS is already well known to the readers of the Popular Science Monthly as a contributor of historical and psychological articles especially valuable and interesting. His position upon the editorial staff of one of the most important European journals gives him extraordinary opportunities to discern events having a real bearing upon contemporary thought.
PopularScience_18961201_0050_002_0005.xml
article
196
196,197,198,199,200
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TWO SCIENTIFIC CONGRESSES.
PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY, PRINCETON UNIVERSITY.
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J. MARK BALDWIN
THE pursuit of science does not stop in summer, and those who go abroad for rest or recreation find that science pursues them. It is a very profitable form of science which is thus prosecuted in summer, however, and that in two respects: for, in learning science in a summer congress, one gets the things which the best men oftentimes save up for just this or that occasion, and then again one gets the men thrown in.
PopularScience_18961201_0050_002_0006.xml
article
201
201,202,203,204,205,206,207,208,209,210,211,212,213,214
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THE SO-CALLED CALIFORNIA “DIGGERS.”
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MABEL L. MILLER
TWO years ago I began to collect notes bearing on the settlements, manners, and customs of Indian tribes once inhabiting the country along the banks of the Sacramento and Feather Rivers, from the American River, north to Chico Creek and eastward into the Sierra Nevada Mountains.
PopularScience_18961201_0050_002_0007.xml
article
215
215,216,217,218,219,220
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INDIVIDUALISM VERSUS COLLECTIVISM.*
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THE RIGHT HON. LEONARD COURTNEY
BY the beginning of the present reign the study of political economy in this country had worked itself free from earlier errors, and it had come to be believed that the secret of social regeneration lay in the utmost allowance of freedom of action to every individual of the community, so far at least as that action affected himself, coupled with the most complete development of the principle of self-reliance, so as to bring home to every member, freed from legal restraint on his liberty of action, the moral responsibility of self-support and of discharging the duties, present and to come, of his special position.
PopularScience_18961201_0050_002_0008.xml
article
220
220,221,222,223,224,225,226,227,228,229,230,231
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POSSESSION AND MEDIUMSHIP.
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PROF. WILLIAM ROMAINE NEW BOLD
ALL the phenomena of which I have been treating in my past papers can be grouped under the three conceptions of suggestibility, automatism, and subconscious mental states. Suggestibility, in its narrowest sense, denotes an increased tendency on the part of certain mental states to work out their own proper results, without interference from other states, and especially without interference from that innermost essence of our sense of self which we call our will.
PopularScience_18961201_0050_002_0009.xml
article
232
232,233,234,235,236,237,238,239,240
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IDIOTS SAVANTS.
CHIEF OF CLINIC, DEPARTMENT OF NERVOUS AND MENTAL DISEASES, VANDERBILT CLINIC, COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS.
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FREDERICK PETERSON
THE term idiots savants is applied to all such idiots, imbeciles, or feeble-minded as exhibit special aptitudes of one kind or another, always out of proportion to their intellectual development in other directions, and often remarkable as compared with similar accomplishments or faculties in normal individuals.
PopularScience_18961201_0050_002_0010.xml
article
240
240,241,242,243,244,245,246,247,248,249,250
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IGNEOUS INTRUSIONS AND VOLCANOES.
PROFESSOR OF GEOLOGY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN.
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ISRAEL C. RUSSELL
MANY geologists have watched the action of volcanoes in eruption, and have gazed into their craters when in a state of mild activity.
PopularScience_18961201_0050_002_0011.xml
article
250
250,251,252
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NATURAL HISTORY IN THE PRIMARY SCHOOLS OF FRANCE.
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FANNY BIGNON
DURING the last few years instruction in our primary schools has been undergoing an interesting evolution. The authorities have broken away from superannuated traditions, and have arranged courses of a wholly new character. There are no more long analyses, endless conjugations, and dictations of catchwords.
PopularScience_18961201_0050_002_0012.xml
article
252
252,253,254,255,256,257,258
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THE BORDER LAND OF TRAMPDOM.
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C. W. NOBLE
LAST summer it was my fortune to spend the vacation on a unique trip through Michigan. My chum and I went down to Berrien Springs to try our hand selling books, but a week of this kind of life sufficed to show us that the rapid road to fortune did not lie here, as the advertisements would lead us to believe, and we abandoned books, bag, and baggage and joined the great army of men “on the road.”
PopularScience_18961201_0050_002_0013.xml
article
258
258,259,260,261,262,263,264
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SKETCH OF HENRY DARWIN ROGERS.
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THE family of which the “Rogers brothers” were conspicuous members furnishes a striking instance of the concurrence of consanguinity and affinity of genius and mental tendencies, and its history affords a marked confirmation of the doctrine of hereditary genius.
PopularScience_18961201_0050_002_0014.xml
article
265
265,266,267
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Correspondence.
THE MORAL OF THE “SYMPSYCHOGRAPH.”
SHALL VIVISECTION BE RESTRICTED?
INTERPRETATIONS OF MALTHUSIANISM.
NATIVE AMERICAN POTTERY.
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Editor Popular Science Monthly: SIR: I was both surprised and humiliated to find on my return from Bering Sea, a few days ago, a large correspondence from persons who had taken the “Sympsychograph” seriously. I had not the slightest idea that any one capable of “reading bound books” would be deceived by the meaningless phrases in that bit of burlesque.
PopularScience_18961201_0050_002_0015.xml
article
267
267,268,269,270,271,272
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Editor's Table.
A THEOLOGICAL VIEW OF EVOLUTION.
INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE.
COMPLETION OF THE SYNTHETIC PHILOSOPHY.
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ON more than one occasion lately we have had to note the growing liberality of theological thought in relation to scientific questions; and we now have before us another striking example of the same tendency in an address delivered at the recent Church Congress in England by Archdeacon Wilson, of Manchester, on The Bearing of the Theory of Evolution on Christian Doctrine.
PopularScience_18961201_0050_002_0016.xml
article
272
272,273,274,275,276,277,278,279,280
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Scientific Literature.
SPECIAL BOOKS.
GENERAL NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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THE trees, the author of this book * says, may be justly numbered among our best friends. But we need to know them better. “It is not enough to be able to distinguish an ash from a hickory or a fir from a spruce; it is more important by far that we should become acquainted with the form and character of the leaves, the fruit, and the bark, and thus acquire a fuller knowledge of the way the tree lives.
PopularScience_18961201_0050_002_0017.xml
article
280
280,281,282,283,284,285,286,287,288,289
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Fragments of Science.
MINOR PARAGRAPHS.
NOTES.
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Mental Overstrain in Education.—In a recent address before the British Medical Association, under the above title, Dr. G. E. Shuttleworth called attention to some of the harmful results caused by the undiscriminating educational methods of the public schools.
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