Issue: 18961001

Thursday, October 1, 1896
OCTOBER, 1896
6
True
49
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Articles
cover
721
721
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_18961001_0049_006_0001.xml
article
721
721,722,723,724,725,726,727,728,729,730,731,732,733,734
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THE METRIC SYSTEM.
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PROF. T. C. MENDENHALL
IN the June number of this Journal there appeared a paper on the Metric System, by Herbert Spencer. It was originally published as a series of anonymous letters in the London Times, in the course of a discussion growing out of proposed legislation by the English Parliament.
PopularScience_18961001_0049_006_0002.xml
article
734
734,735,736,737,738,739,740,741,742,743,744,745,746,747,748,749,750,751,752,753,754,755,756
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NEVADA SILVER.
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CHARLES HOWARD SHINN.
A THIRD of a century ago the surface bonanzas of the Comstock began to yield their treasures. Californians long skilled in gold mining were rushing by thousands into the newly discovered silver districts, and prospecting the mountains and deserts east of the Sierras.
PopularScience_18961001_0049_006_0003.xml
article
756
756,757,758,759,760,761,762,763
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A MEASURE OF MENTAL CAPACITY.
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DR. EMIL KRAEPELIN
WE are able to calculate almost precisely the amount of work any given machine—as a steam engine or an electric-lighting plant—is capable of performing, and the amount of fuel that will be required to develop the calculated power. When we come to man we are much less certain, although a skillful army surgeon can tell almost at a glance whether the recruit standing before him is strong enough to meet the requirements of the service, and there are machines in the market that will inform us in what time we can pull a given weight to a given height.
PopularScience_18961001_0049_006_0004.xml
article
763
763,764,765,766,767,768,769,770,771
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SOME BEGINNINGS IN SCIENCE.
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PROF. COLLIER COBB
LONG before the sciences were pressing their claim to equal rank with ancient learning at Harvard, before Jefferson had seen the establishment of the University of Virginia working under the system of elective studies which he had planned, or before the magnificently endowed institutions of technology were giving what Herbert Spencer regards as knowledge of most worth, we find the beginnings of these things in the newly established university of a State that could boast of only two schools which taught more than the three R's and the very rudiments of the English language.
PopularScience_18961001_0049_006_0005.xml
article
771
771,772,773,774,775,776,777,778,779,780,781,782,783,784,785
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THE VIVISECTION QUESTION.
III.—THE UTILITY OF VIVISECTION.
IV.—THE ARGUMENT AS TO THE UTILITY OF VIVISECTION IN SPECIAL CASES.
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C. F. HODGE,
ASIDE from the highest “use of science,” its satisfaction of man’s intellectual wants and its influence upon his character, science has many “ practical ” values connected with its development. And it is to these “ uses ” of physiological research that we will confine attention, bearing in mind that we are addressing those who believe that, after duty, human health and happiness are the highest values in the world, and that the greatest evils in the world, after moral evil, are human suffering caused by disease and premature death.
PopularScience_18961001_0049_006_0006.xml
article
786
786,787,788,789,790,791,792
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ACETYLENE, THE NEW ILLUMINANT.
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V. J. YOUMANS.
THE advent of the electric light, the Siemens-Lungren regenerative burner, and the Welsbach incandescent mantle, all within a comparatively short period, threw the lighting industry into a very unsettled condition. There had begun, however, to appear some order out of the chaos.
PopularScience_18961001_0049_006_0007.xml
article
793
793,794,795,796,797,798
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THE SIGNIFICANCE OF LEAVES.
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F. SCHUYLEK MATHEWS
WHILE we admire and enjoy the greenness and the general effect of foliage, and regard the forms of single trees if they are particularly graceful or otherwise peculiar in shape, we seldom give special attention to individual leaves, but are rather inclined to neglect them as common and trivial.
PopularScience_18961001_0049_006_0008.xml
article
799
799,800,801,802,803,804,805,806,807,808,809,810
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THE EDUCATIVE VALUE OF CHILDREN'S QUESTIONING.
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HENRY L. CLAPP.
I KNOW intimately a little boy, now six and a half years old, who has been a persistent questioner since he was four. Thirteen months ago he began to read, and now reads The Youth's Companion, Alice in Wonderland, Lang's and Andersen's Fairy Tales, Kingsley's Water Babies, and Greek Heroes, school readers, and many other books with good understanding and excellent expression.
PopularScience_18961001_0049_006_0009.xml
article
810
810,811,812,813,814,815,816,817,818,819,820,821
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THE SELF AND ITS DERANGEMENTS.
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PROF. WILLIAM ROMAINE NEWBOLD.
IN this and my succeeding paper I intend to take up a group of phenomena which involve some of the most perplexing of psychological and metaphysical questions. There is no problem that can be of greater interest to us as human beings than that which concerns the nature of my self, my origin, and my destiny.
PopularScience_18961001_0049_006_0010.xml
article
821
821,822,823,824,825,826,827,828
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EXAGGERATION AS AN AESTHETIC FACTOR.
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M. F. REGNAULT.
EXAGGERATION is .a natural tendency of our minds, and the fact is recognized by every psychologist. Yet, when we study human thought and action, we forget the propensity to exaggeration and exercise our ingenuity in accounting for seemingly odd social facts which could be readily explained by applying this principle.
PopularScience_18961001_0049_006_0011.xml
article
828
828,829,830,831,832,833,834,835,836,837
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ENRICO FERRI ON HOMICIDE.
SECOND PAPER.
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HELEN ZIMMERN.
FERRI passes in review 1,711 individuals, of whom 711 are soldiers, 699 criminals, and 301 madmen. In this minute examination of anthropometric data he discusses almost every case, pointing out its specific characteristics by means of ample comparisons, which justify his methods of research and his conclusions, as well as throw light on the difficult and not yet firmly established study of criminal anthropology.
PopularScience_18961001_0049_006_0012.xml
article
837
837,838,839,840,841
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SKETCH OF ROBERT EMPIE ROGERS.
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FOR the facts in the life of ROBERT EMPIE ROGERS, as well as of the other members of this family famous in science, the memorial paper of the late Dr. W. S. W. Ruschenberger is almost our only authority. Robert Empie Rogers was the youngest of the four brothers, sons of Patrick Kerr Rogers and Hannah Blythe, whose researches, several and joint, have conferred so much honor on the name.
PopularScience_18961001_0049_006_0013.xml
article
842
842
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Crrespondence.
WOMAN’S CLAIMS TO THE BALLOT.
A CORRECTION.
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SIR : The “antagonism of the sexes” suggested in your criticism of my paper on Woman and the Ballot, in the June number of the Monthly, must have been read between the lines, as I have not the least feeling of that nature to betray. I confess, however, that I have a passionate love of justice which is apt to be aroused by any attempt to forestall judgment such as was made by Mrs. Linton and Mr. Talbot in announcing the raison d'être for woman.
PopularScience_18961001_0049_006_0014.xml
article
843
843,844,845,846
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Editor’s Table.
ANOTHER BISHOP ON SCIENCE TEACHING IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS.
THE FOURTH BUFFALO MEETING OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION.
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WE were not a little surprised to read in Nature some time ago an article from which it appeared that Bishop Temple, of London, had, in an address delivered before the Diocesan Conference, expressed his entire opposition to the teaching of science in elementary schools.
PopularScience_18961001_0049_006_0015.xml
article
846
846,847
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Scientific Literature.
SPECIAL BOOKS.
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WE have here a popular view of one division of the fruitful field that is being worked by the physiological psychologists of the present generation in Italy.* The author lays a broad foundation for his treatment of his subject by describing the general functions of each part of the brain and those of the spinal cord.
PopularScience_18961001_0049_006_0016.xml
article
848
848,849,850,851,852,853,854
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GENERAL NOTICES.
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IN her recent volume, the fourth of the Memoirs of the American Folklore Society, Mrs. Bergen* has brought together and classifed fourteen hundred and seventy five different superstitions, thus giving us the most complete collection in English.
PopularScience_18961001_0049_006_0017.xml
article
854
854,855
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PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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Agricultural Experiment Stations. Connecticut : Cost of Nitrogen, Phosphoric Acid, and Potash in Connecticut ; Examination of Food Products sold in Connecticut.—Michigan State College : Tuberculosis and A Preliminary Bulletin on Pasteurization of Milk.
PopularScience_18961001_0049_006_0018.xml
article
855
855,856,857,858,859,860,861,862
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Fragments of Science.
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A New Classification of Elevation Areas.— Prof. Hermann Wagner, of Göttingen, one of the best-known geographers and statisticians of Germany, has recently published a new altitude classification of the earth’s surface, which he divides into five regions, as follows :
PopularScience_18961001_0049_006_0019.xml
article
862
862,863,864
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MINOR PARAGRAPHS.
NOTES.
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THE recent death of Lord Lilford, Thomas Lyttleton Powys, at the age of sixty-three, has removed one of the most devoted and conscientious of English ornithologists. He was interested in natural history from his earliest years, and was President for many years of the British Ornithologists’ Union.
PopularScience_18961001_0049_006_0020.xml
article
865
865,866,867,868,869,870,871,872,873,874
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INDEX.
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Acetylene, Storing of. (Frag.)..................................... 140 The New Illuminant. V. J. Youmans................... 786 African Village Scene. (Frag.).................................... 139 Agriculture, Science as a Help to. (Frag.).......................... 426
PopularScience_18961001_0049_006_0021.xml