Issue: 18951201

Sunday, December 1, 1895
DECEMBER, 1895.
2
True
48
Saturday, October 11, 2014

Articles
cover
144
144,145
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0001.xml
article
145
145,146,147,148,149,150,151,152,153,154,155,156,157
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PRINCIPLES OF TAXATION.
I.—THE COMPARATIVELY RECENT TAX EXPERIENCES OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES.
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DAVID A. WELLS
BEFORE passing to the detailed consideration under proper and consecutive subdivisions of the above subject, the writer thinks it expedient to outline briefly the exceptional circumstances under which his studies and investigations have been prosecuted; inasmuch, as apart from any expectation of consequent intelligent criticism on his conclusions, a somewhat personal narration may help to a better popular understanding of a great chapter in the nation’s fiscal experience, which, although without a parallel in all history, has thus far received scant notice and little appreciation on the part of economic writers and historians.
PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0002.xml
article
157
157,158,159,160,161,162,163,164,165
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NEW EVIDENCE OF GLACIAL MAN IN OHIO.
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PROF. G. FREDERICK WRIGHT
THE doubt which lingers in the minds of many concerning the sufficiency of the evidence for the existence of man in America during the Glacial period is so great, and has been so industriously fomented in certain quarters, that special interest has been manifested in a fresh discovery recently brought to light in Ohio.
PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0003.xml
article
166
166,167,168,169,170,171,172,173,174,175,176,177,178,179,180
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STUDIES OF CHILDHOOD.
XIII.—UNDER LAW.
(b) ON THE SIDE OF LAW.
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JAMES SULLY
IN the previous chapters we studied the child as the antagonist of law. It is evident, however, that his relation to law presents another aspect. Thus a good deal of the early criticism of parental government, so far from implying rejection of all rule, plainly implies its acceptance.
PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0004.xml
article
180
180,181,182,183,184,185,186,44,188,189,190,191,192,193
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THE ANATOMY OF SPEED SKATING.
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R. TAIT McKENZIE
BY R. TAIT McKENZIE. SPEED skating as a distinct branch of athletics is of recent date, but as an art it is one of the oldest cultivated by the vigorous nations of the temperate and frigid zones. Fitz Stephen, the historian of London, speaks of the sport as taking place in the twelfth century, but the first mention in history occurs eighteen hundred years ago, in the Edda, where the god Uller is represented as distinguished by beauty, arrows, and skates.
PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0005.xml
article
193
193,194,195,196,197,198
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SUGGESTIBILITY, AUTOMATISM, AND KINDRED PHENOMENA.*
I. MENTAL CO-ORDINATION AND ORGANIZATION.
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W. ROMAINE NEWBOLD
THE thoroughgoing parallelism of mind and brain may be regarded as an accepted principle of current psychology. There remain, it is true, a few psychologists who dispute it, and many of those who accept it as a working principle refuse to regard it as final.
PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0006.xml
article
198
198,199,200,201,202,203,204
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PROFESSOR FORBES ON “HARNESSING NIAGARA.”
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ERNEST A. LE SUEUR
BY ERNEST A. LE SUEUR, SC. B. THE past few months have seen the successful completion of a gigantic work, of epoch-making extent and significance— the Niagara Falls electrical power transmission plant. An article appeared in these pages in September, 1894, describing something of the difficulties which had been met and overcome by the engineers in charge of the water power and generator installation of the Cataract Construction Company, as the corporation which had the contracts for erecting the plant was named.
PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0007.xml
article
204
204,205,206,207,208,209
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HEALTH EXPERIMENTS IN THE FRENCH ARMY.
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STODDARD DEWEY
THE report made to the French Parliament in April of this year by General Zurlinden, Minister of War, discloses a new aspect of that life in barracks to which the armed peace of Europe condemns all her young men for a period of their best years.
PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0008.xml
article
209
209,210,211,212,213,214,215,216,217,218,219
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PREHISTORIC ENGINEERING AT LAKE COPAIS.
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JOHN DENISON CHAMPLIN
BY JOHN DENISON CHAMPLIN. HOMER, in his famous catalogue of the Greek and Trojan forces in the second book of the Iliad, enumerates more than twenty towns around Lake Copais which contributed collectively to the Greek fleet eighty ships, in each of which “Were six score youths, Boeotia’s noblest flower.”
PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0009.xml
article
220
220,221,22,223,224,225,226,227,228
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SIR JOHN LUBBOCK AND THE RELIGION OF SAVAGES.
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JAMES CARMICHAEL
THE question as to whether there are races or tribes on the earth entirely without a religion is one that demands on its threshold a definition of the word “religion.” That it can not fairly be tied down to advanced forms of belief seems apparent, and hence the necessity of falling back on the original meaning of the word—i. e., that of binding fast the human mind to a sense of the obligation which it owes to supernatural powers.
PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0010.xml
article
229
229,230,231,232,233
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AMONG THE CANNIBAL ISLANDS.
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LAENAS GIFFORD WELD
SPREAD out before you a chart of the South Pacific—one upon which are set down the many details useful to the navigator of this strangely interesting region. Besides the intricate labyrinth of islands, reefs, rocks, and shoals which are scattered over its surface, there are recorded the variations of the compass, the directions of the ocean currents, and the results of countless soundings.
PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0011.xml
article
234
234,235,236,237,238,239,240,241,242,243
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MIRACLES IN FRENCH CANADA.
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EDWARD FARREE
THE village of Beaupré, on the north shore of the St. Lawrence, twenty-one miles east of Quebec, is famous as the chief seat in America of the cult of Saint Anne, mother of the Virgin Mary. About 1620 a Breton crew, struck by a tempest off the lower end of the Isle of Orleans, vowed a sanctuary to her if she would rescue them, and on being driven ashore at Beaupré, then known as Petit Cap, built her a log chapel.
PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0012.xml
article
244
244,245,246,247,248,249,250,251,252,253,254,255
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HAS IMMIGRATION INCREASED POPULATION?
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SYDNEY G. FISHER
THE immigration which, formed the basis of our colonial population was very slight. The men who fought the Revolution and created the United States were almost exclusively native. The population of New England, as is well known, was produced out of an immigration of not much over 20,000, all of whom arrived before the year 1640.
PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0013.xml
article
256
256,257,258
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INSECTS’ EGGS.
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M. V. BRANDICOURT
JOHANNES SWAMMERDAM, a Dutch naturalist, who was the first to examine insects with a microscope, and whose investigations were published in 1757, gave some curious details concerning the eggs of insects.* “Some are oblong,” he said, “others ovoid or round.
PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0014.xml
article
259
259,260,261,262,263,264
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SKETCH OF DAVID DALE OWEN.
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DAVID DALE OWEN was born at Braxfield House, near New Lanark, Scotland, June 24, 1807. He was the fourth son and sixth child in a family of eight children. All but the first born, a son, lived to adult age. His father, Robert Owen, the celebrated philanthropist, was a native of North Wales.
PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0015.xml
article
265
265,266,267,268,269,270,271,72,273
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PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTIONS.
VIII.—TEACHER.
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HERBERT SPENCER
TEACHING implies knowledge of things to be taught; and as, for various reasons, the priest comes to be distinguished by his possession of knowledge, from him more especially is it to be obtained. Moreover, being released from life-sustaining activities, he has more time than others for giving information and enforcing discipline.
PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0016.xml
article
273
273,274,275,276,277
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WHY THE SEA IS SALT.
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G. W. LITTLEHALES
FROM the first chapter of the first book of Moses, called Genesis, we learn that, as between water and land, the ocean had the first place in terrestrial existence, for it is there stated that on the third day in the calendar of the creation the waters under the heavens were gathered together and the dry land appeared.
PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0017.xml
article
278
278,279,280,281,282
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A NATURAL PAPER MILL.
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VIRGIL G. EATON
DIGGING out here in my back pasture lot, so I may find water for my cows when next summer’s drought comes on, I have discovered one of the oldest paper mills in the world—a mill that was in good working order when Alexander went east for other nations to subdue, and one which had whole quires and reams in stock when men lived in caves and the human families exchanged calls with the monkeys.
PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0018.xml
article
282A
282A,282B
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Correspondence.
THE VALUE OF VEGETABLE FOODS.
INDIVIDUALITY IN THE NESTS OF THE ENGLISH SPARROW.
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SIR: I have just read Dr. Benjafield’s lecture, in the September number, on Fruit as a Food and Medicine. I have read the Popular Science Monthly for twenty-five years, or rather from the very first number, and have always found it filled with very valuable and intensely interesting matter; but the above article I consider, from a hygienic standpoint, rather superior to anything I have read anywhere for a long time.
PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0019.xml
article
282B
282B,282C,282D,282E,282F,282G,282H,282I
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Editor's Table.
THE BORDERLAND OF NONSENSE.
THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL VIEW OF CIVILIZATION.
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THAT mental stimulation may produce marked physical results is a proposition which few would be found to deny or even to question; but it is an unfortunate thing when this simple and limited truth is converted into a pretext for virtually denying the laws of physical causation, where human beings are concerned.
PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0020.xml
article
282I
282I,282J,282K,282L,282M,282N,282O,282P,282Q
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Scientific Literature.
SPECIAL BOOKS.
GENERAL NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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MAN has ever been curious about the origins of things. In the childhood of the race he wondered where the wind came from and the water in the streams, how the sun and moon were made, what caused the thunder and the lightning, and how the first plants, the first animals, and the first human beings came to be.
PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0021.xml
article
282Q
282Q,282R,283,284,285,286,287,288,289
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Fragments of Science.
MINOR PARAGRAPHS.
NOTES.
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Constituents of Ocean Bottoms.—In his summary of the results of the Challenger Expedition, Dr. Murray classifies marine deposits as littoral, shallow water, and deep sea. Such deposits are, in origin, either land-derived or pelagic—that is, of the ocean.
PopularScience_18951201_0048_002_0022.xml