Issue: 18950801

Thursday, August 1, 1895
AUGUST, 1895
4
True
47
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Articles
cover
432
432,433
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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article
433
433,434,435,436,437,438,439,440,441,442,443,444,445
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PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTIONS.
IV.—ORATOR AND POET, ACTOR AND DRAMATIST.
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HERBERT SPENCER
THINGS which during evolution become distinct were of course originally mingled: the process of evolution implies this. Already we have seen that in the triumphal reception of the conqueror, originally spontaneous and rude but in course of time becoming an established ceremonial elaborated into definite forms, there were germs of various arts and the professors of them.
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article
446
446,447,448,449,450,451,452,453,454,455,456,457
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NEW CHAPTERS IN THE WARFARE OF SCIENCE.
XX.—FROM THE DIVINE ORACLES TO THE HIGHER CRITICISM.
III. THE CONTINUED GROWTH OF SCIENTIFIC INTERPRETATION.
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ANDREW DICKSON WHITE
THE science of biblical criticism was, as we have seen, first developed mainly in Germany and Holland. Many considerations there, as elsewhere, combined to deter men from opening new paths to truth: not even in those countries were these the paths to preferment; but there at least the sturdy Teutonic love of truth for truth’s sake found no such obstacles as in other parts of Europe.
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article
458
458,459,460,461,462,463,464,465,466,467,468,469,470,471
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ART AND EYESIGHT.
MEMBER OF THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS OF ENGLAND.
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LUCIEN HOWE
THERE was perhaps no more interesting object at the Columbian Exposition, as an example of a developing appreciation, than the typical Illinois farmer as he stood surprised and bewildered before some of the works of the modern school of painters.
PopularScience_18950801_0047_004_0004.xml
article
471
471,472,473,474,475,476,477
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THE PHYSICAL ELEMENT IN EDUCATION.
PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS IN YALE UNIVERSITY.
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EUGENE L. RICHARDS
IT would be as unwise as it is impossible to expect that every person engaged in education should be able to survey the whole field. Each educator takes a part, and is very apt to think that his or her part is the most important. Education, until quite recently, has been so widely regarded as brain culture that the whole trend of education is to develop the mind as one organ of the body, as if mind resided in the brain alone.
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article
477
477,478,479,480,481,482,483,484,485,486,487,488,489,490,491,492,495,496,497,498,499,500,501
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APPARATUS FOR EXTINGUISHING FIRES.
DEVELOPMENT OF AMERICAN INDUSTRIES SINCE COLUMBUS. XIX.
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JOHN G. MORSE
A PECULIARITY common to all nations is the fact that not until the industries of peace and the armaments of war had been well developed was attention paid to procuring safeguards against conflagrations; and when it was at last realized that means for the extinguishing of fire were necessary, so little was attempted that the results were entirely inadequate.
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article
501
501,502,503,504,505,506,507,508
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THE MOTIVE FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH.
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HUBERT LYMAN CLARK
AT the meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science held at Oxford in August, 1894, the president, the Marquis of Salisbury, delivered a remarkable address on Unsolved Problems of Science, which called forth much criticism, particularly from scientific journals.
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article
508
508,509,510,511,512,513,514,515,516,517,518,519,520,521
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PLEASURES OF THE TELESCOPE.
VI.—FROM LYRA TO ERIDANUS.
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GARRETT P. SERVISS
WE resume our celestial explorations with the little constellation Lyra, whose chief star, Vega (a), has a very good claim to be regarded as the most beautiful in the sky. The position of this remarkable star is indicated in map No. 17. Every eye not insensitive to delicate shades of color perceives at once that Vega is not white, but blue-white.
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article
522
522,523,524,525,526,527,528
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ARGON.
THE NEW CONSTITUENT OF THE AIR.
PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY IN SMITH COLLEGE.
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DR. JOHN TAPPAN STODDARD
ON the 31st of January last the Royal Society of England held a special meeting in Burlington Gardens. Formal invitation to this meeting had been extended to the members of two other scientific bodies, and an audience of at least eight hundred, which included the most distinguished scientific men of England, assembled to listen to the account of the discovery of a new substance in our atmosphere.
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article
528
528,529,530,531,532,533,534,535,536,537,538
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THE NERVOUS SYSTEM, AND ITS RELATION TO EDUCATION.
TORONTO.
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JOHN FERGUSON
JOHN LOCKE, the physician and philosopher, long ago said that all our knowledge came from experience. Throughout his Treatise on the Human Understanding he develops this view of the acquisition of knowledge. This was followed by the writings of David Hume, the Scottish historian and metaphysician, who held that we knew nothing of objects in themselves, but only through their qualities; or, in other words, that we know of nothing but ideas.
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article
538
538,539,540
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TO BÁRBARA.
(A Study in Heredity.)
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DAVID STARR JORDAN
LITTLE lady, cease your play For a moment, if you may; Come to me, and tell me true Whence those black eyes came to you. Father’s eyes are granite gray, And your mother’s, Bárbara, Black as the obsidian stone, With a luster all their own. How should one so small as you Learn to choose between the two?
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article
541
541,542,543,544,545,546,547,548
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THE WORK OF IDEAS IN HUMAN EVOLUTION.
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GUSTAVE LE BON
THE study of the different civilizations that have succeeded one another since the origin of the world proves that they have always been guided in their development by a very small number of fundamental ideas. If the history of peoples should be reduced to the story of their ideas, it would not be very long.
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548
548,549,550,551,552,553
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SKETCH OF CHARLES UPHAM SHEPARD.
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CHARLES UPHAM SHEPARD was born at Little Compton, a town in the southeastern corner of Rhode Island, June 29, 1804. He was fitted for college in the Providence Grammar School and entered Brown University in 1820, but left the following year to join the sophomore class of the new college which opened then at Amherst, Mass.
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article
554
554,555,556,557,558,559
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
THE SPHERE OF SCIENCE.
PROFESSOR HUXLEY.
HONOR NOT HONORS.
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WE publish in this number a criticism by a gentleman who, we understand, is connected with one of our most distinguished universities, of the article which appeared in these columns some months ago under the title of Back to Dogma. In that article we maintained that the then recent address of Lord Salisbury, as President of the British Association, was, to all intents and purposes, an appeal to the scientific world to put on once more those dogmatic shackles from which the philosophical advance of the present century was supposed to have set it free; and we endeavored to show how fatal to the further progress of scientific theory a compliance with such a suggestion would be.
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559
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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THIS is Part I, including mechanics light, and sound, of a text-book, not a treatise, the necessity for which has grown out of the author’s own needs as a teacher. The book does not pretend to cover the subject, nor to treat exhaustively those portions with which it deals.
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article
566
566,567,568,569,570,571,572,573,574,575
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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A Child’s Thoughts about Providence.— A very instructive account of the mental aspects of childhood is given by Miss Isabel Fry, in a book called Uninitiated, one of the purposes of which is to show that it takes much longer for children to learn the real drift and meaning of the habits and expressions and feelings of their grown-up friends and attendants than it does to master the language in which those feelings are conveyed.
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article
575
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NOTES.
OBITUARY NOTES.
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IN the excavation of the ancient Roman city at Silchester, England, twelve rectangular inclosures or buildings have been found, all of the same type, and containing furnaces, obviously of an industrial character, and of various sizes.
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