Issue: 18950501

Wednesday, May 1, 1895
MAY TO OCTOBER, 1895
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Saturday, October 11, 2014

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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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STUDIES OF CHILDHOOD.
VIII.—FEAR.
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JAMES SULLY
IN passing from a study of children's ideas to an investigation of their feelings we seem to encounter quite a new kind of problem. A child has the germs of ideas long before he can give them clear articulate expression; and, as we have seen, he has at first to tax his ingenuity in order to convey by intelligible signs the thoughts which arise in his mind.
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ARCHÆOLOGY IN DENMARK.
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PROF. FREDERICK STARR
A MUSEUM of national history is, in a sense, a symptom of patriotism. No wonder, then, that in Denmark, where every child absorbs love of country with his mother's milk and inhales it at every breath, such museums are in high favor. Two great governmental museums at Copenhagen illustrate the history proper of Denmark; one, the Museum of Northern Antiquities, is chiefly devoted to objects back of history.
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THE OFFICE OF LUXURY.
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M. PAUL LEROY BEAULIEU
THE question whether luxury is legitimate or illegitimate, useful or injurious, is most actively debated. The moralists claim that it is within their peculiar field, and it has been one of their favorite subjects for discussion from the days of antiquity down.
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PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTIONS.
I.—PROFESSIONS IN GENERAL.*
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HERBERT SPENCER
WHAT character professional institutions have in common, by which they are as a group distinguished from the other groups of institutions contained in a society, it is not very easy to say. But we shall be helped to frame an approximately true conception by contemplating in their ultimate natures the functions of the respective groups.
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KIDD ON “SOCIAL EVOLUTION.”
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W. D. LE SUEUR
TO want to say something and to have something to say are two very different things. Mr. Benjamin Kidd, when he took in hand to write a book on Social Evolution, wanted very badly to say something; but whether he really had anything to say is a question upon which we can hardly imagine his own mind, now that he has had time to think over it, is fully made up.
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AN OLD NATURALIST—CONRAD GESNER (1516-1565).
THE MARMOT (Mus Alpinus).
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W. K. BROOKS
SO many lives have been devoted to the earnest study of Nature that disinterested zeal and untiring industry are no peculiar claims to our interest, however inspiring and instructive they may be. CONRAD GESNER was not only a faithful student and a great educational influence, but a hero who took life in his hand for the service of man, and calmly facing horrors more awful than a battlefield, laid it down, like so many forgotten physicians, at his post of duty.
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THE WORK OF THE NATURALIST IN THE WORLD.*
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PROF. CHARLES SEDGWICK MINOT
THERE can be no broader question, touching us all, than the influence of our profession upon the world. With your permission I will present a series of considerations in regard to our professional careers which ought, in my opinion, to receive more attention than hitherto.
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BUSINESS, FRIENDSHIP, AND CHARITY.
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LOGAN G. McPHERSON
AS man has learned with increasing complexity of means toward an increasing variety of ends to wrest food and fuel and shelter from the earth and all that springs therefrom, each man has had to depend more and more upon the efforts of his fellowmen; and hence has arisen that marvelously intricate intertwining of effort that characterizes the civilization of to-day.
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RACE MIXTURE AND NATIONAL CHARACTER.
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LEWIS R. HARLEY
THE term “nation” as used at the present time involves much confusion in thought; and an eminent writer, in order to fix clearly the meaning of this term in the mind of the student, has defined the nation as a population of an ethnic unity, inhabiting a territory of a geographic unity.
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WOMAN AS AN INVENTOR AND MANUFACTURER.*
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THE question has been seriously raised whether woman is capable of important achievements as an inventor, and an opinion actually exists and is held in good faith by some otherwise intelligent persons that she is not. The Patent-Office records have been searched to show that woman’s modern work in inventive art has been insignificant; and occasionally, when some woman’s invention is announced, it is treated as something unusual and very remarkable.
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MICROBES AS FACTORS IN SOCIETY.*
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M. L. CAPITAN
IN an address delivered before the Anthropological Society of Paris, July 2, 1867, Paul Broca very neatly emphasized the fact that the population of a country can not increase indefinitely. As the population multiplies on a territory that is extensible, the more undesirable lands are gradually improved and occupied.
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THE ILLUSTRIOUS BOERHAAVE.*
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WILLIAM T. LUSK
OF the serious questions which need to be considered at the outset of a professional career there is none more vital than that of personal conduct. This is recognized by the provision for the medical man of a code of ethics, which shows him how the portion of the ten commandments which teaches one’s duty toward one’s neighbor, is applicable to his dealings with the public and with other medical men.
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CORRESPONDENCE.
STEEL ENGRAVINGS AS WORKS OF ART.
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IN the article on bank-note engraving, published in your March issue, the writer classes the engraving of bank notes among the fine arts, and describes it as the last and highest step in a long series, beginning with the wood and metal engravings of Albrecht Dürer.
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
PUBLIC EDUCATION AND PUBLIC OPINION.
THE ALLEGED DOGMATISM OF SCIENCE.
SPENCER ON PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTIONS.
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THE editor of the Revue des Deux Mondes contributes to a recent number of that periodical an article entitled Education and Instruction, in which are some things with which we heartily agree and others from which we are compelled to dissent.
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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GEIKIE’S Great Ice Age, when it appeared in 1877, took a position at once as one of the standard treatises in geological science. It has held that place ever since, although the department of geology with which it is concerned has been more actively and scrutinizingly studied, perhaps, than any other.
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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Doggish Sympathy.—A correspondent of the London Spectator writes that he owned a large dog Rose, and a smaller and less beautiful dog Fan, of different breeds, but both passionately attached to a member of the household who was commonly called their best friend.
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NOTES.
OBITUARY NOTES.
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THE leaves of pine and fir trees are inflammable—in strong contrast with the leaves of deciduous trees, which can not be made to burn at all while green—because of the pitch they contain, which consists of fats and ethereal oils, and compared with which the proportion of water is small.
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