Issue: 18940401

Sunday, April 1, 1894
APRIL, 1894
6
True
44
Thursday, October 30, 2014

Articles
cover
720
720,721
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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721
721,722,723,724,725,726,727,728,729,730,731,732,733,734,735,736,737,738,739
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NEW CHAPTERS IN THE WARFARE OF SCIENCE.
XIX.—FROM CREATION TO EVOLUTION.
PART II. THEOLOGICAL TEACHINGS REGARDING THE ANIMALS AND MAN.
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ANDREW DICKSON WHITE
IN one of the windows of the cathedral at Ulm a mediæval glass-stainer has represented the Almighty as engaged in creating the animals, and there has just left the divine hands an elephant fully accoutered, with armor, harness, and housings— ready for war.
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article
740
740,741,742,743
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TRUSTS THEIR OWN CORRECTIVE.
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GEORGE A. RICH.
THE test of a theory is to predict what will happen. When the cry was first raised a few years ago against the so-called trusts, and legislation of one kind and another was proposed, there were those who declared that if these combinations were left alone they would prove their own worst enemies.
PopularScience_18940401_0044_006_0003.xml
article
744
744,745,746,747,748,749,750,751,752,753,754,755,756,757
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NEW LIGHTS ON THE PROBLEM OF FLYING.
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PROF. JOSEPH LE CONTE
SOME of the readers of The Popular Science Monthly may remember that in November, 1888, I published an article in which I tried to show the physical impossibility of a true flying machine—i. e., one which could both lift and propel itself without the help of a balloon.
PopularScience_18940401_0044_006_0004.xml
article
758
758,759,760,761,762,763,764,765,766,767,768,769,770,771,772,773,774,775
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THE METHOD OF HOMING PIGEONS.
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C. F. HODGE
WHEN Sir John Lubbock* rotated a paper disk upon which ants were moving in a given direction and the ants turned so as to maintain their course, it seemed as if they were endowed with some mysterious sense or power of direction, like that of a magnetic needle upon its pivot.
PopularScience_18940401_0044_006_0005.xml
article
776
776,777,778,779,780
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INCIDENTS OF CAMBODIAN LIFE.
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ADHÉMARD LECLERE
THE Cambodian woman carries her child a-straddle of her left hip, with her arm passed round its little body. She rarely leaves it, except to attend to something in the house or the yard ; and this custom of carrying the child thus is followed up so constantly that one shoulder of the woman finally becomes higher than the other.
PopularScience_18940401_0044_006_0006.xml
article
781
781,782,783,784,785,786,787,788,789,790,791
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THE ICE AGE AND ITS WORK.
ERRATIC BLOCKS AND ICE-SHEETS.—(Continued.)
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ALFRED R. WALLACE
WE must now consider briefly the distribution of erratics in North America, because they present some peculiar features and teach us much concerning the possibilities of glacier motion. An immense area of the Northeastern States, extending south to New York, and then westward in an irregular line to Cincinnati and St. Louis, is almost wholly covered with a deposit of drift material, in which rocks of various sizes are imbedded, while other rocks, often of enormous size, lie upon the surface.
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article
791
791,792,793,794,795,796,797,798,799,800,801
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A CENTURY OF THE TELEGRAPH IN FRANCE.
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WALTER LODIAN
IT is one hundred years ago (the 22d of March, 1792) since a young man named Claude Chappe presented himself at the bar of the Legislative Assembly. He carried there a secret vocabulary composed of nine thousand nine hundred and ninety-nine words, represented by some numbers, and destined to be transmitted by a system of visual telegraphy by means of a machine carrying the signals from station to station.
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article
802
802,803,804,805,806,807,808,809,810,811
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AN ILLUSTRATIVE CHAPTER ON LEGAL DEVELOPMENT.
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WILLIAM W. BILLSON
THE evidences are abundant that primitive man had no conception of ownership as distinguished from or as subsisting independently of possession. He recognized, no doubt, that one in possession of an object had a right to defend and maintain his advantageous position.
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article
811
811,812,813,814,815
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THE BEAVER EATER.
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HORACE T. MARTIN
A VOCABULARY of the Chippeway Indians in J. Long’s Voyages and Travels (1791) conveys a slight knowledge of the fur trader’s vernacular of just a century ago. The records offer many attractions to the naturalist, acquainting him with the curious Indian names for animals, together with their English equivalents, and exhibiting the original forms of many words familiar now only in a modified or corrupted state.
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article
816
816,817,818
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ON NEW ENGLAND AND THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI BASIN IN THE GLACIAL PERIOD.
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PROF. JAMES D. DANA.
SINCE the publication, in this Journal, of Prof. G. F. Wright’s paper on the Unity of the Glacial Epoch, nearly a year since,† this subject has been much discussed in the scientific journals of the country, and with some interesting developments besides those within the purpose of the writers.
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article
819
819,820,821,822,823,824,825,826
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THE LATE PROFESSOR TYNDALL.
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HERBERT SPENCER
AMONG the various penalties entailed by ill-health, a not infrequent one is the inability to pay the last honors to a valued friend ; and sometimes another is the undue postponement of such tribute to his memory as remains possible. Of both these evils I have just had experience.
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article
827
827,828,829,830,831,832,833
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THE ORIGIN OF ART.
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M. LAZAE POPOFF
WE are accustomed to say that Egypt is the cradle of the arts; yet archæologists have demonstrated that the earliest works of art are of epochs far anterior to the ancient Egyptian civilizations. According to these authors, these works were contemporaneous with the presence of the reindeer in the south of France, and of a time when the mammoth had not yet disappeared, and when man, ignorant of the metals, made all his instruments of stone, wood, and bone.
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article
833
833,834,835,836,837,838,839,840
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SKETCH OF L. D. VON SCHWEINITZ.
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DURING colonial times in America, and even down into the present century, science advanced over a much obstructed path. Not having then attained to its present power and esteem, there were but few of its votaries whose whole time and best energies it could command.
PopularScience_18940401_0044_006_0014.xml
article
841
841,842
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CORRESPONDENCE.
CLOSE OF THE GLACIAL PERIOD.
DOG PSYCHOLOGY.
THE “BLUE LAWS” A MYTH.
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GEOLOGISTS who are only slightly versed in astronomy are apt to make a serious mistake on this subject. The latest which has fallen under my notice is by Prestwich, in the article entitled The Position of Geology, in the February number of this periodical, page 541. He says: “The last of these astronomical periods was calculated to have commenced two hundred and fifty thousand years and to have ended eighty thousand years ago.
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article
842
842,843,844,845,846,847
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
THE UNEMPLOYED.
WHY BENEFICENCE SHOULD NOT BE ENFORCED.
POINTS IN LIBRARY MANAGEMENT.
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WHEN a condition of things supervenes in which a considerable percentage of the population is cut off from the means of support by lack of work, we need not hesitate to say that something is wrong. We are not much in the habit of attributing purpose to Nature; but the language of teleology is sometimes convenient, and we shall perhaps not be misunderstood if we say that the apparently enforced idleness of thousands of men, with all the poverty and distress thence resulting, can not be part of Nature’s plan, or at least can not illustrate the normal working of natural law.
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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THE author of this work undertakes to treat the principal problems of philosophy by a method which, though he does not assert it to be entirely new, he does not believe has been systematically carried out by any previous writer. He applies to his method the term “genetic,” and he explains that it “consists in referring every fact to its place in the series to which it belongs.”
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article
856
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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Spencer-smashing at Washington.—At a meeting of the Washington Society for Philosophical Inquiry held January 28,1894, the Rev. Dr. Momerie, of London, read a paper on Agnosticism, consisting chiefly of a criticism of Mr. Herbert Spencer and a defense of the current dualistic conception of the soul as the thinking personality or ego considered as distinct from and independent of the body.
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863
863,864
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NOTES.
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AN interesting study is published by J. Walter Fewkes of the legend of the destruction of the Tusayan pueblo of Awátobi current among the Hopi Indians, and of his researches on the site of the pueblo for the illustration and verification of the story.
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864
864
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OBITUARY NOTES.
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PROF. HEINRICH R. HERTZ, of the University of Bonn, who won fame by his demonstration of the intimate connection of light and electricity, died at Bonn, on New-Year’s day, of blood poisoning induced by a chronic disease of the nose. He was born at Hamburg on the 22d of February, 1857; entered the Engineering School in 1875; afterward devoted himself to physics, studying in Munich and Berlin; became an assistant to Helmholtz in 1875; settled in Kiel in 1883 as a privat docent in theoretical physics; was appointed in 1885 Professor of Physics in the technical Hofschule in Carlsruhe; and in 1885 succeeded Clausius as Professor of Physics at Bonn.
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advertisement
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Advertisement
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