Issue: 18940201

Thursday, February 1, 1894
FEBRUARY, 1894
4
True
44
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Articles
cover
432
432,433
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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article
433
433,434,435,436,437,438,439,440,441,442,443,444,445,446,447,448
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NEW CHAPTERS IN THE WARFARE OF SCIENCE. XIX.—FROM CREATION TO EVOLUTION.
THE VISIBLE UNIVERSE.
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ANDREW DICKSON WHITE,
BOVE the portal of the beautiful cathedral of Freiburg may be seen one of the most interesting of thought fossils. A mediaeval sculptor, working into stone various theological conceptions of his time, has there represented the creation.
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article
449
449,450,451,452,453,454,455,456,457,458
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NOTES FROM A MARINE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY.
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PROF. WILLIAM S. WINDLE.
FOR the past fifteen years it has been customary for the members of the Biological Department of the Johns Hopkins University to devote the summer vacations to pursuing their studies on the seashore. “The Johns Hopkins Marine Laboratory,” as the organization is called, is under the direction of Prof. W. K. Brooks, and has been confined to no permanent location, but has been moved from place to place as the wishes of those interested demanded.
PopularScience_18940201_0044_004_0003.xml
article
458
458,459,460,461
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THE RELATION OF EVOLUTION TO POLITICAL ECONOMY.
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CHARLES S. ASHLEY.
IF the reader will call to mind the great work of John Stuart Mill, which still contains the best exposition extant of the whole subject of political economy, he will remember that Mill considers it by an analysis of production, distribution, and exchange, to which he adds a book on the influence of the progress of society on production and distribution, and another on the influence of government.
PopularScience_18940201_0044_004_0004.xml
article
461
461,462,463,464,465,466,467,468,469,470,471
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PHYSICAL CONDITIONS OF THE DEEP SEA.*
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SIDNEY J. HICKSON,
IT is not surprising that the naturalists of the early part of the present century could not believe in the existence of a fauna at the bottom of the deep seas. The extraordinary conditions of such a region—the enormous pressure, the absolute darkness, the probable absence of any vegetable life from want of direct sunlight—might very well have been considered sufficient to form an impassable barrier to the animals migrating from the shallow waters and to prevent the development of a fauna peculiarly its own.
PopularScience_18940201_0044_004_0005.xml
article
472
472,473,474,475,476,477,478,479,480
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HEREDITY IN RELATION TO EDUCATION.*
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WESLEY MILLS,
PROFESSOR OF PHYSIOLOGY, MCGILL UNIVERSITY, MONTREAL. IT is of course necessary that the education of a country shall be systemized, harmonized, and consolidated. This involves so much machinery, including examinations, inspections, reports, etc., that those concerned are under constant temptation to take the form for the substance, and to mistake the immediate issue for the great end.
PopularScience_18940201_0044_004_0006.xml
article
481
481,482,483,484,485,486
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THE CIRCASSIAN SLAVE IN TURKISH HAREMS.
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MRS. ELLEN BATTELLE DIETRICK.
ONE of the curious anomalies of history is found in the existence of a race whose men are characterized by a passionate love of freedom, equaling that of a William Tell, but whose women habitually accept slavery as the most desirable of earthly conditions.
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article
486
486,487,488,489,490,491,492,493,494,495,496,497,498,499,500,501,502
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WHERE BANANAS GROW.
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JAMES ELLIS HUMPHREY.
IN spite of the fact that a bunch of bananas was a rare sight, and a single one a luxury, when we who are still young were children, they have become so common that we have ceased to ask the questions naturally prompted by unaccustomed sights; and this, not because those questions are no longer unanswered, but as the result of that familiarity which makes us forget our ignorance.
PopularScience_18940201_0044_004_0008.xml
article
502
502,503,504,505,506,507,508,509,510,511,512,513,514
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TYNDALL AND HIS AMERICAN VISIT.*
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E. A. YOUMANS.
IN the death of Prof. Tyndall science has lost one of its greatest modern leaders, and the century one of its most striking personalities. In early life he became prominent as an original investigator, and later he was even more distinguished as a popular scientific teacher.
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article
514
514,515,516,517,518,519
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THE PSYCHOLOGY OF A DOG.
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JOHN MONTEITH.
IN his recent work on Justice, Mr. Herbert Spencer turns a new light upon old questions in ethics, by tracing the roots of ethical principles to the animal community. There is something wonderful in the way certain animals form a society and exemplify the egoistic and altruistic sentiments of justice working in harmony.
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article
520
520,521,522,523,524,525
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SUPERSTITIONS OF THE FRENCH CANADIANS.
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BLANCHE L. MACDONELL.
THE folklore of Canada is the more interesting that it has its origin in various sources. The Canadian transported with him from fruitful Normandy, from poetical and superstitious Brittany, a wealth of popular myths, traditions, legends, and beliefs which are almost as firmly held in French Canada of to-day as ever they were in the ancient days of faith.
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article
525
525,526,527,528,529,530
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THE WANDERING JEW AT THE SALPÊTRIÈRE.
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M. HENRI COUP1N.
THERE is always something of truth in even the most confused legends. Such is the case, for example, with the widespread legend of the Wandering Jew, which seems at first sight to have been wholly invented, but which can in reality be explained by examples originating in neuropathy.
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article
531
531,532,533,534,535,536
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THE SHAPE OF THE EARTH FROM A PENDULUM.
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PROF. J. H. GORE.
IT was thought that a maximum paradox was reached when the quotation ex pede Herculem (from the foot, Hercules) forced its way into use. Hercules, in laying out the stadium, the length of the running course in the Olympian games, used his foot as the unit, and made the stadium six thousand feet long.
PopularScience_18940201_0044_004_0013.xml
article
537
537,538,539,540,541,542,543,544,545,546
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THE POSITION OF GEOLOGY.
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PROF. JOSEPH PEESTWICH.
THE position of geology in this country at the present time, more especially as relates to the later geological periods, is anomalous and possibly without precedent. On one side its advance is barred by the doctrine of uniformity, and on the other side by the teaching of physicists.
PopularScience_18940201_0044_004_0014.xml
article
546
546,547,548,549,550,551
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SKETCH OF DAVID STARR JORDAN.
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PROF. MELVILLE B. ANDEKSON.
DAVID STARR JORDAN was born in 1851, at Gainesville, New York. His father was a farmer who devoted far more attention to the elder poets than to the Rural New-Yorker. His mother is characterized by strength of will, depth of feeling, and pithiness of speech.
PopularScience_18940201_0044_004_0015.xml
article
552
552,553,554,555,556,557,558,559,560,561,562,563,564,565,566,567,568,569,570,571,572,573,574
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
THE LATE PROF. TYNDALL.
LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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BY the death of Prof. Tyndall England has lost not only one of her foremost men of science, but a man who, by his labors and his character, has contributed in an eminent degree to render the science of the nineteenth century honorable. Some men take to science as to a gainful trade, hoping that, in the competition of life, it will serve their turn better, perhaps, than any other career they see open to them.
PopularScience_18940201_0044_004_0016.xml
article
574
574,575,576,577
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NOTES.
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A Correction.—The article on Vegetable Diet, by Lady Walb. Paget, which appeared in the Monthly for November, 1893, was reprinted from the Nineteenth Century, to which magazine it should have been credited. THE Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, has the awarding of certain medals for meritorious discoveries and inventions which will contribute to the promotion of arts and manufactures, as follows: The Elliott Cresson medal, gold, for some discovery in the arts and sciences, or for the invention and improvement of some useful machine, or for some new process or combination of materials in manufactures, or for ingenuity, skill, or perfection in workmanship ; the John Scott Legacy Premium (twenty dollars) and medal, bronze, for useful inventions; and the Edward Longstreth medal of merit, silver, for useful invention, important discovery, and meritorious work in science or the industrial arts, or contributions to them.
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