Issue: 18930901

Friday, September 1, 1893
SEPTEMBER, 1893
5
True
43
Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Articles
cover
576
576,577
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_18930901_0043_005_0001.xml
article
577
577,578,579,580,581,582,583,584,585
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WHY SILVER CEASES TO BE MONEY.
PROFFSSOR OF POLITICAL ECONOMY, HARVARD UNIVERSITY.
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F. W. TAUSSIG
THE striking fall in the price of silver and the unmistakable tendency among civilized countries to cease using it as a basis for currency, suggest the inquiry whether these results are accidental or flow from causes so regular and continuous in their application as to be analogous to physical law. Thirty years ago most economists would have hesitated little in seeking analogies of this sort.
PopularScience_18930901_0043_005_0002.xml
article
586
586,587,588,589,590,591,592,593,594,595,596,597,598
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FOLK-LORE STUDY IN AMERICA.
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LEE J. VANCE.
IN the summer of 1887 a circular letter containing a proposal for the formation of a Folk-lore Society in America was quietly, perhaps timidly, sent to a faithful few. Again, in October of the same year was issued a second letter, subscribed with a hundred and four names, representing different parts of the United States and Canada.
PopularScience_18930901_0043_005_0003.xml
article
598
598,599,600,601,602,603,604,605,606,607,608,609
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REFORMATORY PRISONS AND LOMBROSO'S THEORIES.
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MISS HELEN ZIMMERN.
IN no branch of social science has so much progress been made of recent years as in the treatment of the criminal. Mankind in general has at last come to recognize what Sir Thomas Moore knew long ago, that the end of punishment is "nothing else but the destruction of vices and the saving of men."
PopularScience_18930901_0043_005_0004.xml
article
610
610,611,612,613,614,615,616,617,618,619,620,621
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ANTHROPOLOGY AT THE WORLD'S FAIR.
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PROF. FREDERICK STARR.
EVERY great international exposition is, in a certain sense, a practical study in anthropology. Recent world's fairs have, however, shown more and more a tendency to make an especial exhibit in anthropology and kindred sciences. This was very noticeable in 1889 at Paris, and in our own World's Columbian Exposition there is an especial department—Department M —of Anthropology, under the directorship of Prof.
PopularScience_18930901_0043_005_0005.xml
article
622
622,623,624,625,626,627,628,629,630,631,632,633
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RECENT SCIENCE.
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PRINCE KROPOTKIN
AT one of the recent sittings of the French Academy of Sciences, Henri Moissan, whose name has lately been prominent in chemistry in connection with several important discoveries, read a communication to the effect that he had finally succeeded in obtaining in his laboratory minute crystals of diamonds.* His communication was followed by a paper by Friedel, who has been working for some time past in the same direction, and has attained similar though not yet quite definite results; and, finally, Berthelot, who also was working in the same field, but followed a different track, announced that, in view of the excellent results obtained by Moissan, he abandons his own researches and congratulates his colleague upon his remarkable discovery.
PopularScience_18930901_0043_005_0006.xml
article
634
634,635,636,637,638,639,640,641,642,643,644,645,646,647,648,649,650,651
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THE PILGRIM PATH OF CHOLERA.
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ERNEST HART
WITH cholera steadily creeping toward our shores, and all Europe standing armed against the invader, it becomes a matter of the extremest interest to inquire how the disease escapes from its home in India, under what influences it becomes able to break its bounds, invade the outer world, and carry death and devastation into countries where not only has it no natural home, but where it is so far an exotic that even after repeated attempts it fails to become acclimatized.
PopularScience_18930901_0043_005_0007.xml
article
651
651,652
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GRANDFATHER THUNDER.
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ABBY L. ALGER
DURING the summer of 1892, at York Harbor, Me., I was in daily communication with a party of Penobscot Indians from Oldtown, among whom were an old man and woman, from whom I got many curious legends. The day after a terrible thunderstorm I asked the old woman how they had weathered the storm.
PopularScience_18930901_0043_005_0008.xml
article
653
653,654,655,656,657,658,659,660,661,662
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SCIENTIFIC COOKING.
A PLEA FOR EDUCATION IN HOUSEHOLD AFFAIRS.
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MISS M. A. BOLAND
THE general interpretation of the colloquial use of the word scientific as applied to cooking is that manner of making dishes which is carried out according to some exact method, which has been proved by experiment to be correct or satisfactory.
PopularScience_18930901_0043_005_0009.xml
article
662
662,663,664,665,666,667,668,669,670,671,672,673
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PREHISTORIC JASPER MINES IN THE LEHIGH HILLS.
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H. C. MERCER
BEGINNING at Durham, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and following the trend of the Lehigh hills toward the Schuylkill near Reading, and generally in close connection with veins of hematite, occurs a series of outcrops of the hard homogeneous rockknown as jasper.
PopularScience_18930901_0043_005_0010.xml
article
673
673,674,675,676,677,678,679,680,681,682
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ORIGIN OF LITERARY FORMS.
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M. CHARLES LETOURNEAU
WHAT in current language we call literature, the literary æsthetics of civilized peoples, poetry intelligently composed and revised according to complicated metrical laws—written works, made to be read, not sung, and addressed to a cultivated public—only represent the last term of literary evolution.
PopularScience_18930901_0043_005_0011.xml
article
682
682,683,684,685,686,687,688
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THE PSYCHOLOGY OF LIZARDS.
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M. J. DELBOEUF.
I PUBLISHED two articles in February and October, 1891, telling of two ocellated lizards which I had captured in May, 1890—one at Port Bon, on the borders of Spain, the other on the banks of the Tarn, near Peyrdean, France. I described their characteristic differences at length, telling how the former lizard was bold, snappish, suspicious, and stupid; and the latter was timid, gentle, confiding, and straightforward.
PopularScience_18930901_0043_005_0012.xml
article
688
688,689,690,691,692,693,694,695
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SKETCH OF HENRY CARRINGTON BOLTON.
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THE New York Academy of Sciences, founded in 1817 as the Lyceum of Natural History, is the oldest and most influential scientific society in the city. During a period of seventy-six years it has has but six presidents, viz.: Dr. Samuel L. Mitchill, who served seven years; Prof.
PopularScience_18930901_0043_005_0013.xml
article
696
696,697,698,699
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CORRESPONDENCE.
MAJOR POWELL ON "ARE THERE EVIDENCES OF MAN IN THE GLACIAL GRAVELS?"
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SIR: The article by Major Powell, which appeared in your July number, calls for a few words of commertt. It was written apparently as an indirect reply to our own paper in the April issue. But it contains little more than a restatement of some elementary truths in geology, which, however new they may be made to appear by the art of the writer, are really somewhat ancient, and form a part of the stock of every tyro in the science.
PopularScience_18930901_0043_005_0014.xml
article
699
699,700,701
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EDITOR'S TABLE.
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AMONG the hopeful signs of the times we may reckon the increased attention that is being given in our higher schools to the study of "civics," a term which includes the general principles of government, the Constitution of our own country in particular, and the duties of citizenship.
PopularScience_18930901_0043_005_0015.xml
article
702
702,703,704,705,706,707,708,709,710,711,712
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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As the author truly states in his preface, most of the text-books of embryology aim rather at explaining the general progress of development within the several animal groups than at supplying complete descriptions of individual examples.
PopularScience_18930901_0043_005_0016.xml
article
712
712,713,714,715,716,717,718
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
Explosion of Kitchen Boilers.
The Australaslan Association.
Derelicts on the Ocean.
Indo-China.
Mongol Waterworks.
Hygienic Value of the Bicycle.
"Crocodile Tears."
The Limits of Parental Discipline.
Vitality in Intellectual Work.
Science In Elementary Schools.
Fighting the Gypsy Moths.
Superstitions about Snakes.
Cruelty to Children.
Steamboats on Long Island Sound.
Unsolved Problems in Geology.
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The most common cause of the explosion of kitchenrange boilers is frost. If the pipes are frozen so that the steam raised by the fire can not escape, the danger of an explosion is very great. This should be prevented, where there is a liability of the pipes being frozen, by protecting the pipes and apparatus generally from the effects of frost.
PopularScience_18930901_0043_005_0017.xml
article
718
718,719,720
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NOTES.
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WOOD ashes are recommended in the American Agriculturist, by Mr. J. M. Stahl, as a valuable medicine for farm animals. The author keeps them, with charcoal and mixed with salt, accessible to his hogs, with the best effects; and he furnishes them to his horses by putting an even teaspoonful with the oats twice a week or by keeping the ashes, with the salt mixture, constantly before the animals.
PopularScience_18930901_0043_005_0018.xml
article
720
720,721
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OBITUARY NOTES.
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THE Rev. T. Wolle, pastor of the Moravian church, Bethlehem, Pa., whose death was recently announced, was an ardent student of fresh-water algæ, and author of three important publications on the Freshwater Algæ, the Desmids, and the Diatoms of the United States.
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