Issue: 18930801

Tuesday, August 1, 1893
AUGUST, 1893
4
True
43
Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Articles
cover
432
432,433,434,435,436,437,438,439
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STUDIES OF ANIMAL SPEECH.
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PROF. E. P. EVANS
THE enthusiasm with which Mr. Garner has devoted himself to the study of simian speech, and the general interest excited by his discoveries, naturally suggest a comparison of his investigations with those of his predecessors in this department of linguistic research.
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433
433
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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440
440,441,442,443,444,445,446,447,448,449,450,451,452,453
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LEARN AND SEARCH.*
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PROF. RUDOLPH VIRCHOW.
OUR university has during its existence, now for more than eighty-two years, celebrated the beginning of a new university year in a peculiarly solemn manner. This October day is the one among the festivals it observes which invites it to enter into self-contemplation, to a review of its acquired results, to a testing of the ways it has struck out, and again to the consideration of new problems and to a look into the future.
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453
453,454,455,456,457,458,459,460,461,462,463
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PROTECTION FROM LIGHTNING.
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ALEXANDER McADIE
DURING the year 1891 two hundred and five lives were lost (that we know of) in the United States, east of the Rocky Mountains, directly through the action of lightning. How many were lost indirectly, and how many cases there were of shattered health and more or less permanent injury, we can only surmise.
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463
463,464,465,466,467,468,469,470,471,472
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SUCCESS WITH SCIENTIFIC AND OTHER MEETINGS.
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NO tendency of these times is more marked than that toward organization. It manifests itself as plainly in scientific inquiry, literary investigation, or the cultivation of art as in the sphere of industry or finance. Let chemistry, folk lore, or musical education engage the minds of a group of people, and forth-with they unite themselves to further the interest they have at heart.
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article
473
473,474,475,476,477,478,479,480,481,482,483,484,485,486,487,488,489,490
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PROFESSOR WEISMANN'S THEORIES.*
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HERBERT SPENCER
APART from those more special theories of Prof. Weismann I lately dealt with, the wide acceptance of which by the biological world greatly surprises me, there are certain more general theories of his—fundamental theories—the acceptance of which surprises me still more.
PopularScience_18930801_0043_004_0006.xml
article
490
490,491,492,493,494
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THE COLOR CHANGES OF FROGS.
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PROF. CLARENCE M. WEED
ONE who, with observant eye, leisurely paddles among the water lilies of an inland lake must often notice how closely the colors of the various frogs resting upon or among the lily pads resemble their environment. In the open sunshine, where light green is the prevailing tint, the colors of the frogs closely approximate it, but in the dark and shady recesses of the forestbordered banks the batrachians are dull, deep brown, with darker spots scattered over their bodies.
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article
494
494,495,496,497,498,499,500,501,502,503
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WHY A FILM OF OIL CAN CALM THE SEA.
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G. W. LITTLEHALES
NEXT to the oil which is used in the beacons of the world to give light to save life, that which is most effective in forestalling the loss of life and the destruction of property is the quantity that is expended by mariners in forming a film around their vessels to subdue the violence of breaking waves.
PopularScience_18930801_0043_004_0008.xml
article
503
503,504,505,506,507,508,509,510,511,512,513,514,515,516
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HOW PLANTS AND ANIMALS GROW.
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DR. MANLY MILES
TOO little is known in regard to the chemistry of foods, or the specific use made of their proximate constituents in the processes of nutrition, to serve as a rational guide in formulating diets, or estimating the relative nutritive value of different articles of food.
PopularScience_18930801_0043_004_0009.xml
article
516
516,517,518,519,520,521,522,523,524,525,526,527
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THE REVIVAL OF WITCHCRAFT.
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ERNEST HART
FINALLY, I must refer to another set of experiments which Dr. Luys conducted before us at La Charité on two of the patients there (on whom I subsequently performed counter-experiments). Having thrown these patients into the state of artificial sleep, he took from his pocket some sealed glass tubes.
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527
527,528,529,530,531,532,533
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SOME REMARKABLE INSECTS.
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WILLIAM J. FOX
THE great majority of persons have no idea of the numerous and singular forms of insects. They are all called “bugs” by most people, yet not one tenth of their number are really bugs. These latter are classed by themselves and are called Hemiptera.
PopularScience_18930801_0043_004_0011.xml
article
533
533,534,535,536,537,538
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THE MATERIAL VIEW OF LIFE AND ITS RELATION TO THE SPIRITUAL.
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PROF. GRAHAM LUSK
WE live in a material age. Old beliefs are being supplanted by what seem to be new truths. The student finds on every hand vast volumes of learning bequeathed to him by those who have labored before him; and he who plunges deeply into this onward-rushing tide of material truths is often startled to find there an undertow sucking away the spiritual foundation.
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539
539,540,541,542,543,544,545
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SEALING IN THE ANTARCTIC.
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A LAPSE of nine months has brought back the Antarctic Whaling Expedition. It will be remembered that in September last four ships—the Balæna, the Diana, the Active, and the Polar Star—set out from Dundee to try their fortunes in the south polar seas, since of late the Davis Strait and Greenland fishing has not met with entire success.
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545
545,546,547,548
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HONEY AND HONEY PLANTS.
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DR. G. G. GROFF.
THE popular idea is that all flowers alike produce honey, and that bees pass from blossom to blossom indiscriminately collecting the sweet fluid. This, however, like many other popular notions, is incorrect. By no means all flowers yield honey, and most of them yield it very scantily.
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549
549,550,551
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SKETCH OF PAOLO MANTEGAZZA.
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PEOF. FEEDERICK STARR
AS a nation we know far too little of what is being accomplished in the world outside. We do in some degree keep track of the work of our English brothers, and occasionally some French or German worker compels our recognition. But there are many intelligent readers who do not know that Italy is to-day a veritable center of scientific work.
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552
552,553
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
A GREAT WORK CONCLUDED.
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ALTHOUGH there still lacks a volume of the ten originally planned by Mr. Herbert Spencer for the exposition of his Synthetic Philosophy, the publication of the tenth volume of the series (the second and concluding one of the Principles of Ethics) gives very legitimate occasion for rejoicing to all who, like ourselves, regarding the Synthetic Philosophy as the most important contribution yet made to an understanding of the laws of the organic world in their special bearing on human life, consider the portion dealing with ethics as the most important of the whole work.
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554
554,555,556,557,558,559,560,561,562,563,564,565
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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THE PRINCIPLES OF ETHICS. By HERBERT SPENCER. Vol. II. New York: D. Appleton & Co. OF the three portions into which Mr. Spencer’s new volume is divided, the first was published separately two years ago, under the title of Justice, and dealt with those tilings which human beings may claim as rights.
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565
565,566,567,568,569,570,571,572,573,574,575
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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The Scientific Meetings at Madison, Wis. —The coming meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science will be held in Madison, Wis., August 16th to 23d inclusive. Previous to the former date, the American Microscopical Society will meet August 14th, 15th, and 16th, under the presidency of the Hon.
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575
575,576,577
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NOTES.
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ACCORDING to a paper by Miss Millicent W. Shinn, the great refractor of the Lick Observatory and the observatory itself may be traced to Mr. Lick’s desire to be immortalized by leaving bequests for costly statues of himself and family. He was told by Mr. Staples that “more likely we shall get into a war with Russia or somebody, and they will come round here with war ships and smash the statues in pieces in bombarding the city.”
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