Issue: 18930401

Saturday, April 1, 1893
APRIL, 1893
6
True
42
Saturday, October 18, 2014

Articles
cover
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0_1,721
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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article
721
721,722,723,724,725,726,727,728,729,730,731,732,733,734
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SCIENCE AND THE COLLEGES.
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DAVID STARR JORDAN.
WE have come together to-day to do our part in raising one of the milestones which mark the progress of education in America. Our interest in higher education brings us here, and our interest in science; and, more than ever in the past, we find these two interests closely associated.
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article
734
734,735,736,737,738,739,740,741,742,743,744,745,746,747,748,749
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THE FESTAL DEVELOPMENT OF ART.
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PROF. DAVID J. HILL
GOETHE says that art is called art simply because it is not Nature. Unquestionably it has its impulse and its laws in the constitution of man. We may, therefore, accept as useful to the proper comprehension of it, in its most general sense, the definition given by Thomas Davidson: “Art is an expression of man’s inner nature imprinted upon matter, so as to appeal to his senses, which deal only with matter, and through which he obtains experience.”
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article
749
749,750,751,752,753,754,755,756,757,758,759,760,761,762,763,764
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THE CORRELATION OF STRUCTURE, ACTION, AND THOUGHT.
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T. LAUDER BRUNTON
MR. PRESIDENT AND GENTLEMEN: Allow me to return you my most grateful thanks for the honor which you have done me in asking me to address you to-night. I believe that there are none here excepting myself who can understand how grateful I feel, because no one else can know how much I owe to this society.
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article
764
764,765,766,767,768,769,770,771,772,773,774,775,776,777,778,779,780,781
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PROF. G. P. WRIGHT AND HIS CRITICS.
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PROF. E. W. CLAYPOLE
A., AKRON
FOR more than twenty years a controversy on the antiquity of man has prevailed in the scientific world. This controversy is still far from decision. The origin of the human family is veiled in obscurity, and all efforts to discover our primeval ancestor have hitherto failed.
PopularScience_18930401_0042_006_0005.xml
article
781
781,782,783,784,785,786,787,788
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THE MAORIS OF NEW ZEALAND.
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EDWARD TREGEAR
MR. TREGEAR has furnished, in the shape of categorical answers to the code of questions sent out by Mr. J. G. Frazer, of the Council of the Anthropological Institute, a mass of information respecting those most interesting of savages, the Maoris of New Zealand.
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article
789
789,790,791,792,793,794,795,796,797,798
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EDUCATION OF OUR COLORED CITIZENS.
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MAUD WILDER GOODWIN
WHAT shall we do with the negro? This is not a question of philanthropy, but of self-interest and self-protection. The negro has come to stay. The race at present numbers some seven or eight millions, and actually holds the balance of power numerically in several of the Southern States.
PopularScience_18930401_0042_006_0007.xml
article
799
799,800,801,802,803,804,805,806,807,808,809,810,811,812
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THE INADEQUACY OF "NATURAL SELECTION."
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HERBERT SPENCER STUDENTS of psychology are familiar with the experiments of Weber on the sense of touch. He found that different parts of the surface differ widely in their ability to give information concerning the things touched. Some parts, which yielded vivid sensations, yielded little or no knowledge of the size or form of the thing exciting it; whereas other parts, from which there came sensations much less acute, furnished clear impressions respecting tangible characters, even of relatively small objects.
PopularScience_18930401_0042_006_0008.xml
article
813
813,814,815,816,817,818,819,820
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FREE PLAY IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION.
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M. FERNAND LAGRANGE
TO all the dangers that threaten the health of the child in existing systems of education, the best and only remedy to oppose is the regular practice of physical exercises. This remedy can, however, be efficacious only provided the exercises are well chosen and applied according to a rational method.
PopularScience_18930401_0042_006_0009.xml
article
821
821,822,823,824,825,826,827
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CONSERVATION OF THE MACKEREL SUPPLY.
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ROBERT F. WALSH
DURING the past few years there has been a serious scarcity of mackerel off the northern. Atlantic coast, or rather the fishermen have been unable to capture such large numbers of this fish as had been their custom in former years. This falling off in the mackerel "catch" has a marked effect upon the fish-food supply of our markets.
PopularScience_18930401_0042_006_0010.xml
article
827
827,828,829,830
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TRACES OF A VANISHED INDUSTRY.
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JOHN GIFFORD
ALINE drawn across New Jersey from Long Branch to Salem separates a peculiar peninsula known as "South Jersey." This rudely triangular region is bounded by the ocean, Delaware Bay and River, and the rich farm lands on the outcrops of the marl-beds.
PopularScience_18930401_0042_006_0011.xml
article
831
831,832,833,834,835,836,837,838,839,840
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ERNEST RENAN.
SKETCH OF HIS LIFE AND WORK.
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GABRIEL MONOD
NOTHING could be simpler, or more of a piece, than the life of Ernest Renan. Study, teaching, and the joys of family life are its whole fabric, and fill it from end to end. For diversions, a little travel and the pleasures of conversation—friendly dinners, and a few frequented salons.
PopularScience_18930401_0042_006_0012.xml
article
841
841,842,843,844,845
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
THE INSOLENCE OF OFFICE.
TEACHING NOT A FUNCTION OF GOVERNMENT.
THE AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION.
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SHAKESPEARE, who knew a good deal, in enumerating some of the ills of life, coupled with "the insolence of office," "the spurns that patient merit of the unworthy takes." For a present-day commentary on these familiar texts we refer our readers to the article by Dr. E. W. Claypole, which appears in this number, under the title of Prof.
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845
845,846,847,848,849,850,851,852,853
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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HARDLY anything can strike the student of history more impressively than the realizing sense which he gains on reading the story of one of the old heroes of the antislavery controversy, such as Mr. Giddings was, of the utter unlikeness of the conditions of the present time in this country and the questions with which it is now occupied, to those which prevailed before the war, within the active memory of men still in the vigor of life.
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article
853
853,854,855,856,857,858,859,860,861,862,863
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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Meeting of the American Psychological Association.—The first regular meeting of the American Psychological Association was held in Philadelphia, at the University of Pennsylvania, on December 27th and 28th. President G. Stanley Hall, of Clark University, presided at the meetings, and the papers presented gave good evidence of the variety and value of the work in experimental psychology which the laboratories of the various colleges are producing.
PopularScience_18930401_0042_006_0015.xml
article
863
863,864
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NOTES.
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THE ethnographic exhibit at the Chicago Fair will be partly within the main building and partly outdoors—the collections being within and other features without. The American department will include specimens of native tribes living their usual life and engaged in their usual occupations; relief maps of the most famous earthworks of the Mississippi Valley; models of the mysterious structures of Yucatan and Central America, with casts of the hieroglyphics; Peruvian mummies; palæolithic implements and relics of the mound-builders; photographs of mounds and ruins from Alaska to Tierra del Fuego; illustrations of primitive religions, games, and folk lore; and numismatic, zoological, geographical, and natural history collections in general.
PopularScience_18930401_0042_006_0016.xml
article
865
865,866,867,868,869,870,871,872,873,874,875
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INDEX.
ARTICLES MARKED WITH AN ASTERISK ARE ILLUSTRATED.
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PAGE Abyssinia, Native Types in. (Misc.).................................... 142 Age, Advancing, Diseases of. (Misc.)................................... 423 Agricultural Revolution, An.* C. M. Weed............................ 638
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