Issue: 18920701

Friday, July 1, 1892
JULY, 1892.
3
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41
Monday, November 24, 2014

Articles
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288
288,289
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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289
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ANTHROPOLOGICAL WORK IN AMERICA.
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PROF. FREDERICK STARR
THE object of this article is not to present a history of anthropology in America, but to sketch briefly some of the work at present done, so as to show the aims and methods of our workers in the science. That anthropology is yearly attracting greater attention among us is shown by the way in which institutions of learning are recognizing its importance.
PopularScience_18920701_0041_003_0002.xml
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308
308,309,310,311,312,313
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PHYSIOLOGY AND THE PREVENTION OF DISEASE.
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DR. J. M. RICE
THAT disease is far more prevalent than our knowledge of prevention justifies can hardly be doubted. An inquiry into the cause of this evil, as well as into the manner in which it can be removed, is therefore, in my opinion, not inopportune. With few exceptions, that which is done at present for the prevention of disease is limited to improving the sanitary conditions surrounding the individual, in consequence of which two very important factors are left out of consideration: Firstly, that many diseases are caused by unfavorable internal conditions, which for the most part can be traced to imperfect development and improper modes of living; and, secondly, that exposure to unfavorable external conditions is not necessarily, followed by illness, for the reason that the body itself offers a certain amount of resistance to the same.
PopularScience_18920701_0041_003_0003.xml
article
313
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WAYS OF THE OWL.
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FRANK BOLLES
SINCE June, 1888, I have had in my possession for longer or shorter periods eleven live owls, including snowy, great-horned, long-eared, barred, and screech owls. I have also had opportunities of watching Acadian and screech owls in a wild state. In June, 1888, Isecured two young barred owls from a hollow beech tree in a White Mountain forest.
PopularScience_18920701_0041_003_0004.xml
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328
328,329,330,331,332,333,334,335,336,337,338,339
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ALMOND CULTURE IN CALIFORNIA.
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HENRY J. PHILPOTT
DURING the fiscal year ending June 30, 1890, the American people imported 5,715,858 pounds of almonds, valued at $813,278. The value of all other nuts imported was $800,376. I confess my surprise at this fact, that we spend more money for almonds than for all other imported nuts put together.
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article
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LEATHER-MAKING.
XV. DEVELOPMENT OF AMERICAN INDUSTRIES SINCE COLUMBUS.
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GEORGE A. RICH
BY GEORGE A. RICH. ZADOCK PRATT, the great leather manufacturer, once gave as his toast at a notable trade dinner, “There is nothing like leather.” The determined, enterprising spirit indicated by that sentiment may be said to be the distinguishing mark of the modern tanner, and it is possible that therein lies the explanation why one in tracing the course of that industry must look so largely to recent years for progress and development.
PopularScience_18920701_0041_003_0006.xml
article
365
365,366,367,368,369,370,371,372,373,374
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PROPER DIET FOR HOT WEATHER.
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DR. N. E. YORKE DAVIES
THE Englishman is very conservative in his ideas and averse to change in his mode of life, at all events so far as his diet is concerned, and it would not be going too far to say that he is averse to change even where the change is for his good in this respect.
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article
375
375,376,377,378,379,380,381,382,383,384,385,386,387,388
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KINDERGARTENS—MANUAL TRAINING—INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS.
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MRS. H. M. PLUNKETT
IN 1877 a prominent Chicago law firm advertised for an office-messenger. In response, more than six hundred college-bred and academy-taught boys applied for the position. In the same year, in the same city, a man engaged in trade put a very inconspicuous advertisement—with no indication that his was a large and old-established house—into an inconspicuous column of a daily paper, calling for the services of an office-boy and messenger.
PopularScience_18920701_0041_003_0008.xml
article
389
389,390,391,392,393,394,395
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TWO RARE MONKEYS.
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DR. L. HECK
THE slender and the short-thumbed monkeys belong, in the truest sense of the word, to an old simian family. The fact is demonstrated as to the Indian slender monkeys, for indubitable representatives of this genus (the Semnopithecus) lived in the Tertiary period.
PopularScience_18920701_0041_003_0009.xml
article
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396,397,398,399,400,401,402
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“NEW” AND VARIABLE STARS.
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J. ELLARD GORE
TO ordinary observation the light of the stars seems to be constant. Although of various degrees of brilliancy, the brightness of each individual star appears to most people to be invariable. This is, of course, true with reference to the great majority of the stars which deck our midnight sky.
PopularScience_18920701_0041_003_0010.xml
article
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403,404,405,406,407,408
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THE WASTE AND GAIN OF THE DRY LAND.
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THE following letter, respecting a former article in the Monthly, has been, addressed to the Editor: Editor Popular Science Monthly: Does M. A. de L’Apparent’s interesting address* on The Future of the Dry Land exhaust all the factors of the inquiry?
PopularScience_18920701_0041_003_0011.xml
article
408
408,409,410,411
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SKETCH OF LUIGI GALVANI.
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THE experiments of Galvani were the beginning of a new course of development in physical science, the fruits of which promise to be infinite in number and of incalculable magnitude and importance. LUIGI GALVANI was born in Bologna, Italy, September 9,1737, and died in the same place, December 4, 1798.
PopularScience_18920701_0041_003_0012.xml
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412
412,413
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CORRESPONDENCE.
GENESIS OF THE DIAMOND.
MORE ABOUT THE PENIKESE SCHOOL.
FLOWERING HABIT OF THE AMERICAN ALOE.
A CORRECTION.
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Editor Popular Science Monthly: SIR: An excellent notice of Prof. A. E. Foote’s paper on Diamonds in Meteorites has newly been forwarded to me, and, as it has apparently aroused no little interest in the general public as well as in scientific circles, may I take the liberty of calling attention to the following facts through the pages of The Popular Science Monthly, to which I have for some years past been a subscriber?
PopularScience_18920701_0041_003_0013.xml
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413
413,414,415
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
MOTHERHOOD.
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MUCH advance has been made within the last generation in the matter of the education of women ; but even the ambitious programmes of the present day do not make as full or as distinct provision as might be desired for instruction in the elementary duties and responsibilities of motherhood.
PopularScience_18920701_0041_003_0014.xml
article
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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PROF. FISKE opens his subject with a discussion of the question of the grade of culture reached by the inhabitants of the American continent at the time of the discovery. The gorgeous accounts given by the Spaniards of the civilization of Mexico and Peru have survived until quite recent times, not only in the popular imagination, but in the writings of sober-minded authors.
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article
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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The American Tea Plant.—The Ilex cassine, or youpon, is a shrub or small tree which grows in the Southern States, along the sea-coast, to not more than twenty or thirty miles inland, from Virginia to the Rio Grande. Its leaves and tender branches were once used by the Indians in the same way that the Chinese tea and the Paraguay tea are used.
PopularScience_18920701_0041_003_0016.xml
article
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NOTES.
OBITUARY NOTE.
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THE arrangements for the meeting of the American Association, to be held in Rochester, N. Y., in August, are nearly completed. The meeting will be opened on Tuesday evening, the 17th, with an address by Secretary F. W. Putnam. President Joseph Le Conte will deliver an address on Wednesday evening, the 18th; a reception will be given the Association by the ladies of the city at the Powers Art Gallery on Thursday, the 19th; and a public lecture will be given on Friday evening.
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