Issue: 18911101

Sunday, November 1, 1891
NOVEMBER, 1891, TO APRIL, 1892
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Saturday, November 29, 2014

Articles
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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UNIVERSITY EXTENSION.
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C. HANFORD HENDERSON
ONE can scarcely fail to notice, in the intellectual life of America, how very rapidly a new thought sweeps across the continent. It travels with almost the speed of the whirlwind. The storm center is commonly Boston or New York or Philadelphia, and progress is toward the westward.
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15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31,32,33,34,35,36,37,38,39,40
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THE DEVELOPMENT OF AMERICAN INDUSTRIES SINCE COLUMBUS.
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WILLIAM F. DURFEE
WHILE the Englishmen, Bessemer and Parry, and the American, Martien, were experimenting in England, the germ which they were trying to develop into vigorous life had been discovered in America; for the evidence is unimpeachable that the late William Kelly had been for several years experimenting in the same direction as his English contemporaries.
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41,42,43
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DO WE TEACH GEOLOGY ?
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ROBERT T. HILL
THE late Prof. Alexander Winchell, who did so much to popularize geology in this country, asked, “ Shall we teach geology ? ” and our educational institutions have answered the question in the affirmative by expending liberal sums for the endowment of chairs in schools and colleges.
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44,45,46,47,48,49,50,51,52,53,54,55,56,57
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DRESS AND ADORNMENT.
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PROF. FREDERICK STARR
THE savage loves finery. Anything bright and showy has for him remarkable attractiveness. Traders have often been blamed for their unequal trades with unsophisticated savages whereby they get a large return for articles of little value.
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57,58,59,60,61,62,63,64,65,66,67,68,69,70,71,72,73,74,75
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SOME OF THE POSSIBILITIES OF ECONOMIC BOTANY.
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GEORGE LINCOLN GOODALE
OUR Association demands of its president, on his retirement from office, some account of matters connected with the department of science in which he is engaged. But you will naturally expect that, before I enter upon the discharge of this duty, I should present a report respecting the mission with which you intrusted me last year.
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75,76,77,78,79,80,81,82,83
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LESSONS FROM THE CENSUS.
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CARROLL D. WRIGHT
TO my own mind, the Federal census system is faulty in many features. It is bungling, unwieldy, and unproductive of scientific results. It is the legitimate growth of time and the honest endeavor to secure broader and broader results to satisfy the growing demand for information concerning all the conditions of the people, and it is perfectly natural that the additions from time to time should have resulted in the present system.
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83,84,85,86,87
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REEF-KNOT NETS.
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WILLIAM CHURCHILL
AT the bottom of textile industries net-meshing appears to precede even such simple weaving as the making of mats of grass and bark. Not only is it the earliest of the textile arts, but it is even more prominently an unchanged art through all the stages of development which have culminated in the Jacquard loom.
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87
87,88,89,90,91,92,93,94,95,96,97,98,99,100
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THE ETHICS OF CONFUCIUS.
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WARREN G. BENTON
IN former papers on the Chinese religions I referred to Confucianism as a religion, following the generally accepted view of the matter. But in this paper I shall treat it as in no legitimate sense a religion, but simply and purely a system of moral or ethical philosophy.
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100,101,102,103,104,105,106,107
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THE ORIGIN OF PAINTING.
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M. LAZAR POPOFF
IT is said repeatedly, as of course, that Egypt was the cradle of the arts. Yet archæologists like Lartet, Garrigue, Cristi, and others have shown that the first artistic manifestations go back to epochs far anterior to the ancient Egyptians.
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108,109,110,111,112,113,114,115,116
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HIGH LIFE.
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EVERYBODY knows mountain flowers are beautiful. As one rises up any minor height in the Alps or the Pyrenees, below snow-level, one notices at once the extraordinary brilliancy and richness of the blossoms one meets there. All Nature is dressed in its brightest robes.
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116,117,118,119,120,121,122
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SKETCH OF JAMES CURTIS BOOTH.
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THE life of Prof. Booth is divided by Mr. Patterson Dubois, in his memorial address, into three periods : that of his preparatory student life, or the formative period, which closed in 1835-’36 ; the creative period, so named “because it called into being a method of technical education which has, probably more than anything else, resulted in establishing chemistry as a factor in commerce, and in gaining for the chemist a recognized place in the economy of the world's work,” 1836 to 1849 ; and the period of his official life as melter and refiner at the United States Mint in Philadelphia.
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EDITOR'S TABLE.
UNIVERSITY EXTENSION.
A GROUP OF SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS.
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THE article by Prof, C. Hanford Henderson on University Extension, which appears in the present number of the Monthly, is one which deserves and doubtless will receive a wide and sympathetic attention. Prof. Henderson states his case well, and no intelligent reader can fail to be impressed with the importance of the movement which he describes and advocates.
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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THIS convenient and timely book contains a summary of the copyright laws at present in force in the chief countries of the world, together with a report of the legislation now pending in Great Britain, a sketch of the contest in the United States, from 1837 to 1891, in behalf of international copyright, and certain papers on the development of the conception of literary property, and on the probable effects of the new American law.
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135,136,137,138,139,140,141,142
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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Artesian Wells and their Flow.—That part of the definition of an artesian well given by the Department of Agriculture that includes all subterranean waters which, on being reached or opened from above, are found to flow by pressure to a higher level than the point of contact, is accepted by Mr. R. Ellsworth Call, in his preliminary paper on Artesian Wells in Iowa, as complete in itself and as properly defining artesian water.
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NOTES.
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A REMARKABLE meteor, found in Arizona, was described by Prof. A. E. Foote, in the Geological Section of the American Association. It was extraordinarily hard, so that a number of chisels were destroyed in cutting it, and the emery wheel used in polishing it was ruined.
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