Issue: 18910901

Tuesday, September 1, 1891
SEPTEMBER, 1891
5
True
39
Monday, December 1, 2014

Articles
cover
577
577
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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577
577,578,579,580,581,582,583,584,585,586,587,588,589,590,591,592,593,594,595,596,597,598,599
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THE DOCTRINE OF EVOLUTION: ITS SCOPE AND INFLUENCE.*
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JOHN EISKE
IF you take up almost any manual or compendium of history written before the middle of the present century, you will generally find it to be a lifeless catalogue of events, and more likely than not an undiscriminating catalogue in which important and trivial events are jumbled together in utter obliviousness of any such thing as historical perspective.
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600
600,601,602,603,604,605,606,607,608,609,610
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NEW CHAPTERS IN THE WARFARE OF SCIENCE.
XIII. FROM FETICH TO HYGIENE.
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ANDREW DICKSON
WE have now seen how powerful in various nations especially obedient to theology were the forces working in opposition to the evolution of hygiene. We shall find this same opposition, less effective, it is true, but still acting with great power in countries which had become somewhat emancipated from theological control.
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article
611
611,612,613,614,615,616,617,618,619,620,621,622,623,624,625,626,627,628,629,630,631,632,633
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GLASS-MAKING.
Y.—GLASS IN SCIENCE.
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C. HANFORD HENDERSON,
WHEN we compare the modern man, the product of many centuries of more or less continuous culture, with the men of ancient Rome, and still more with the men of ancient Greece, the impression unwillingly forces itself upon us that man has somewhat deteriorated since the days of Carthage and Thermopylae.
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article
634
634,635,636,637,638
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SCHOOLS FOR THE INSANE.
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CHARLES W. PILGRIM
THE teaching of the insane is by no means a new idea. Early in the history of the Utica Asylum Dr. Brigham made the experiment of having winter classes, and wrote in his annual report for 1844 of the great advantages resulting therefrom. These classes, however, were not long continued, and, if I mistake not, a like history was enacted in the Northampton Lunatic Asylum, where Dr. Earle, our oldest American alienist, instituted a similar work at about the same time.
PopularScience_18910901_0039_005_0005.xml
article
639
639,640,641,642,643,644,645
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THE LIMITS OF STATE-DUTIES.*
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HERBERT SPENCER.
OF the many reasons for restricting the range of governmental actions, the strongest remains to be named. The end which the statesman should keep in view as higher than all other ends, is the formation of character. And if there is entertained a right conception of the character which should be formed, and of the means by which it may be formed, the exclusion of multiplied State-agencies is necessarily implied.
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645
645,646,647,648,649,650,651,652,653,654,655,656,657,658
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VIEWS OF RUNNING WATER.
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M. J. PICCARD.
IF we ask a person who has not thought about the matter to represent with a pencil, from memory, a stream or fall of water, in nine cases out of ten he will return the paper after having timidly ventured upon a few parallel scratches, looking as much as anything else like the ruts in a road or the hairs of a horse’s tail.
PopularScience_18910901_0039_005_0007.xml
article
658
658,659,660,661,662,663,664
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CAN WE ALWAYS COUNT UPON THE SUN?
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GAEEETT P. SEEVISS.
THE study of the origin and development of species may be pursued with reference to the starry hosts, for there are different species of suns as well as of animals. The wide-ranging eye of the astronomer perceives in the dazzling orb whose rising turns night into day and whose beams vivify the face of the earth, only a minor representative of a great order of radiating bodies peopling the profundities of space.
PopularScience_18910901_0039_005_0008.xml
article
665
665,666,667,668,669,670,671,672,673,674,675,676,677,678
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A CLASSIFICATION OF MOUNTAIN RANGES ACCORDING TO THEIR STRUCTURE, ORIGIN, AND AGE.*
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WAKKEN UPIIAM
THE sea, in its vastness, reaching far beyond the encircling flat horizon, is a better symbol of infinitude and of eternity than is the most majestic mountain range, lifting its serrated forehead miles above the ocean-level and seeming almost to pierce the sky.
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678
678,679,680,681,682
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MUSICAL INSECTS.
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HEBE E. FEANCHESCHINI.
IF we would hear the children of the sun, we must shut the door of our prosaic room behind us, and hurry out before the coming on of dusk to the pond, into the green field, on the moor, to the edge of the wood where life in the double form of animal and plant unfolds itself without restraint.
PopularScience_18910901_0039_005_0010.xml
article
682
682,683,684,685,686,687
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ESKIMO BOATS IN THE NORTHWEST.
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JOHN MUKDOCH.
AS we came in sight of the Eskimo village at Cape Smyth, late in the afternoon of September 8, 1881, some one called out that a boat full of natives was coming off under sail to meet us. We all rushed to the rail, eager for the first sight of our future neighbors, and saw running down before the wind a large boat shaped like a fisherman’s dory, with one mast and a single square sail, of blue drilling, which looked almost black through the mist.
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687
687,688,689,690,691
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TAKE CARE OF THE BIRDS!
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DR. KARL RUSS.
ON an unprejudiced view of the matter, we may well be surprised that a barbarity so foreign to the aspiring tendencies of our age as the destruction of birds should continue ; that exhortations to protect them are still necessary ; and that active harboring and care of them are not matters of course.
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691
691,692,693,694
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SKETCH OF GEORGE LINCOLN GOODALE.
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GEORGE LINCOLN GOODALE was born at Saco, York County, Maine, August 3,1839. His father, Hon. S. L. Goodale, for about twenty years the Secretary of the Maine Board of Agriculture, is widely known as the author of a standard work on the Breeding of Domestic Animals, and as an agricultural chemist.
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695
695,696,697
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
THE WARFARE OF SCIENCE.
INDIVIDUALITY FOR WOMAN.
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OUR readers have had the opportunity of following, in the interesting articles contributed to this periodical by Dr. Andrew D. White, the marvelous history of the struggle which science from its birth has had to wage with the forces of intellectual obstruction.
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697
697,698,699,700,701,702,703,704,705,706,707,708
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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MR. SMOCK entered upon the office of State Geologist on the 1st of October, 1890. Previous to that time the clerical work of the office and the superintendence of the distribution of publications had been carried on since the death of Dr. Cook by Irving S. Upson, at New Brunswick.
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709
709,710,711,712,713,714,715,716,717,718,719
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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Exploration of Mount St. Elias.—The Mount St. Elias expedition organized by the National Geographic Society, under the leadership of Mr. I. C. Russell, with Mr. Mark B. Kerr as topographer, left Seattle, Washington, in June, 1890, and after spending more than two months on the mountain-sides, one half of that time above the snow-line, returned with notes, specimens, and data of the greatest interest.
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719,720,721,722
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NOTES.
OBITUARY NOTES.
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THE second report of the Committee of the American Association on the spelling and pronunciation of chemical terms, as presented to the Indianapolis meeting, includes all the rules and categories of words given in the report to the Toronto meeting, but with the pronunciations of words as enumerated in that report usually omitted, unless they have evoked opinions at variance with the recommendations of the committee from more than one correspondent.
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