Issue: 18910501

Friday, May 1, 1891
MAY, 1891
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Friday, October 31, 2014

Articles
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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NEW CHAPTERS IN THE WARFARE OF SCIENCE.
XII. MIRACLES AND MEDICINE.
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ANDREW DICKSON WHITE
NOTHING in the evolution of human thought appears more inevitable than the idea of supernatural intervention in producing and curing disease. The causes of disease are so intricate that they are reached only after ages of scientific labor.
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ICE-MAKING AND MACHINE REFRIGERATION.
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FREDERIK A. FERNALD
THE manufacture of ice now bids fair to become a regular industry in temperate as well as in tropical climates. Pioneer work in this field was done more than sixty years ago, but it is only within the last ten years that the groping attempts of the early inventors have developed into processes sufficiently economical to make the artificial production of ice a commercial success.
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FORTIFYING AGAINST DISEASE.ϯ
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SHERIDAN DELÉPINE
THE intense excitement and the unbounded hopes created by the announcement that a cure for consumption has at last been found have led me to lecture to-day on a subject which I generally relegate to the end of my course of pathology. For, after discussing the various phenomena which are brought about by disease, and attempting to connect these phenomena with their cause, apparent or real, it is natural to try to explain why these causes do not always bring about the results which are observed only in a certain percentage of cases.
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SOME GAMES OF THE ZUÑI.
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JOHN G. OWENS
PLAY finds its best exemplification in the Indian of the Southwest. Living in a mild and genial climate, naturally shiftless and improvident, this true child of Nature consumes his exuberant vitality by play instead of work. Step to the bank of the Zuñi River on one of those supreme mornings in August, which only the matchless climate of New Mexico knows, and you will behold a sight which for genuine mirth and romp will surpass that of any Eastern outdoor gymnasium or children's park.
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AN EXPERIMENT IN MORAL TRAINING.
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DR. MARY V. LEE
WHILE waiting in a corridor of the Oswego Normal School building, forty or fifty lads and lasses from the practice school marched in quadruple column past me. They were full of life, observant, unaccompanied by teacher, but attending to the duty of the moment in an orderly manner.
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PROFESSOR HUXLEY ON THE WAR-PATH.
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DUKE OF ARGYLL
BUT now—if Nature has indeed never stopped her operations at any one time—if they have been, on the contrary, always continuous in unity of plan amid every change in method, then it follows that we do not know how often new germs may have been introduced and may have had their full development accelerated by processes of comparatively short duration.
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MY GARDEN ON AN ONION.
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KATHARINE B. CLAYPOLE
THERE was one great difference between this garden of mine and the gardens of my neighbors—an enormous difference, I might say—for, while they had onions in their gardens, my garden was on an onion. In fact, the onion was my garden, and in some respects this was an advantage to me.
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76,77,78,79,80,81,82,83
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EVOLUTION OF PATENT MEDICINE.
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LEE J. VANCE
" THIS wonderful remedy works like a charm”—so reads a bold advertisement now lying before me. Why should any patent medicine work like a “ charm ” ? The modern notion of a medical remedy working like a “ charm ” is a survival of the belief that certain secret remedies are charms.
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THE FRENCH INSTITUTE.
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W. C. CAHALL
THE Institute, as it exists to-day, is a creation of Napoleon, and, like all other organizations which arose under the First Consul, reveals his disposition for centralizing and supervising everything, even the literary and scientific societies.
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THE MEXICAN MESSIAH.
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DOMINICK DALY
THERE are few more puzzling characters to be found in the pages of history than Quetzatcoatl, the wandering stranger whom the early Mexicans adopted as the air-god of their mythology. That he was a real personage—that he was a white man from this side of the Atlantic, who lived and taught in Mexico centuries before Columbus was born—that what he taught was Christianity and Christian manners and morals—all these are plausible inferences from facts and circumstances so peculiar as to render other conclusion well-nigh impossible.
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THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN.
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IN studying the plans laid down by Friedrich Froebel for the education of young children, one is reminded of a passage in his letter to Krause, where he says : Here there budded and opened to my soul one lovely bright spring morning, when I was surrounded by Nature at her loveliest and freshest, this thought, as it were by inspiration : That there must exist somewhere some beautifully simple and certain way of freeing human life from contradiction, or, as I then spake out my thought in words, some means of restoring to man himself at peace internally ; and that to seek out this way should be the vocation of my life.
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SKETCH OF NIELS H. C. HOFFMEYER.
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TO Captain Niels Hoffmeyer meteorology owes some of its most important developments, and particularly the organization of what may be called the first ocean weather service. NIELS HENRIK CORDULUS HOFFMEYER was born in Copenhagen, Denmark, June 3, 1836, the son of Colonel A. B. Hoffmeyer, and died in Copenhagen, February 16, 1884.
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CORRESPONDENCE.
ETHICS IN THE SCHOOLS.
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SIR : There is evidently a wide-spread dissatisfaction with the lack of moral influences in our public schools. Religious people declare that the schools are godless, and are producing a generation of atheists. An earnest and growing class think that some modification of the school work should be made that would aim at developing every pupil into the noblest type of a human being.
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
THE YOUNGEST OF THE SCIENCES.
THE DOCTRINE OF NATURAL SELECTION.
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TO know is to be able, to ken is to can: philology proclaims it, and experience confirms it. Centuries ago the commoner phenomena of electricity and magnetism had attracted attention, but no one suspected that they meant anything in particular, or that they afforded indications of a power everywhere present, and only waiting a summons to enter into the service of man.
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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FOR a quarter of a century Chambers’s Handbook of Descriptive and Practical Astronomy has been in the hands of all English-speaking astronomers, and has maintained its ground as a valuable book of reference and an interesting summary of astronomical knowledge.
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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Our Sequoia Forests.—Counting as forests all areas of a thousand acres and upward, Mr. Frank J. Walker computes that there are now 37,200 acres of Sequoia forest in the United States, divided as follows : King’s River forest, 7,500 acres ; Kaweah River, 14,000 ; Tule River, 14,000 ; Kern River, 1,700 acres.
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NOTES.
OBITUARY NOTES.
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ACCORDING to the investigations of an Indian student of the Hindoo folk lore, published at Lucknow, it is believed that if a person is drowned, struck by lightning, bitten by a snake, or poisoned, or loses his life by any accident or by suicide, he goes instantly to hell.
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