Issue: 18900101

Wednesday, January 1, 1890
JANUARY, 1890
3
True
36
Saturday, November 29, 2014

Articles
cover
288
288,289
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_18900101_0036_003_0001.xml
article
289
289,290,291,292,293,294,295,296,297,298,299,300,301,302,303,304,305,306,307,308,309,310,311,312,313,314,315,316,317,318,319
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THE FUTURE SITUS OF THE COTTON MANUFACTURE OF THE UNITED STATES.*
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EDWARD ATKINSON
I have been asked to treat two subjects: 1. Is the present number or the recent increase of cotton-spindles in the United States actually or relatively in excess of the requirements of the population ? 2. Is the South likely to become a formidable competitor with New England in the cotton manufacture ? I submit the facts from which I have made my own deductions, and from which each one may draw his own conclusions according to his own judgment.
PopularScience_18900101_0036_003_0002.xml
article
319
319,320,321,322,323,324,325,326,327,328
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PUBLIC SCHOOLS AS AFFECTING CRIME AND VICE.
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BENJAMIN REECE
THE political and material progress of the nineteenth century have been truly wonderful. The past year was memorable as the anniversary of the inauguration of the first President of this great republic, and what a record of bewildering changes do those hundred years unfold! Thirteen States have been increased to forty-four, and the center of population has moved back from the seaboard to a point nearly a thousand miles in the interior.
PopularScience_18900101_0036_003_0003.xml
article
329
329,330,331,332,333,334
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THE TAOUIST RELIGION.
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WARREN G. BENTON
IN an attempt to unravel the mysteries of the religions of the Chinese, one is confused at the outset by the almost obliterated lines between the three leading forms of religion existing side by side. The process of amalgamation has gone on for so many centuries that one is liable to be misled in an effort to analyze the different creeds.
PopularScience_18900101_0036_003_0004.xml
article
334
334,335,336,337,338,339,340,341,342,343,344,345,346,347,348,349
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LETTERS ON THE LAND QUESTION.
MR. SPENCER’S FIRST LETTER.
MR. GREENWOOD’S LETTER.
PROF. HUXLEY’S LETTER.
SIR L. MALLET’S LETTER.
MR. SPENCER’S SECOND LETTER.
MR. LAIDLER'S LETTER.
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HERBERT SPENCER
FREDERICK GREENWOOD
PROFESSOR HUXLEY
SIR LOUIS MALLET
JOHN LAIDLER
THE following letters, reprinted from the London “Times” of recent dates (from November 7 to 15, 1889), are of great interest on account of the light they throw upon some of the more important aspects of the question of land nationalization, and on the problems of socialism in GENERAL.-EDITOR.
PopularScience_18900101_0036_003_0005.xml
article
349
349,350,351,352,353,354,355,356,357,358,359
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TWO AND A HALF PER CENT.
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GEORGE ILES
THE fall in the rate of interest is one of the most striking facts in the financial history of this generation. At times the price of money has risen, and investors have hoped that the good old rates were to be a permanency; but interest has soon declined again, vibrating about a point a little lower than the center of its former seesaw.
PopularScience_18900101_0036_003_0006.xml
article
359
359,360,361,362,363
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THE RARE FORMS OF ORCHIDS.
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J. DYBOWSKL
THE varieties of plants which, under various titles, charm us as house-ornaments, and give our habitations a character of freshness and life that is always dear to us, are already numerous.
PopularScience_18900101_0036_003_0007.xml
article
364
364,365,366,367,368,369,370,371
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IRRIGATION OF ARID LANDS.
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HENRY J. PHILPOTT
THERE is no more striking difference between the inhabitants of the Eastern and Western United States than the degree of their familiarity with the word irrigation. And there will never be a profounder difference than will be engendered by the thing itself.
PopularScience_18900101_0036_003_0008.xml
article
371
371,372,373,374,375,376,377
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PALM-TREES AND THEIR USES.
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M. J. POISSON
AFTER the grasses, with their various adaptabilities for the purposes of food and the arts, the palm-trees hold the first place; and this, not only on account of the uses for which they are fit, but also by reason of the beauty and amplitude of their foliage and the stately size which many of them attain.
PopularScience_18900101_0036_003_0009.xml
article
377
377,378,379,380,381,382
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A HARVEST FROM THE OCEAN.
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PROF. C. MORTON STRAHAN
THE compensations of nature are nowhere more forcibly illustrated than along the bleak and rugged coasts of Scotland, Ireland, and Brittany, and their adjoining islands. Towering cliffs, whose scarred faces show no sign of verdure and defy all hope of cultivation, clasp the deeply indented bays in rude embrace.
PopularScience_18900101_0036_003_0010.xml
article
382
382,383,384,385,386,387,388,389
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BIRDS WITH TEETH.
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OTTO MEYER
THE birds of our present world, however different they may be from each other in size, shape, color, etc., are remarkably uniform in their anatomical construction. Adapted to a life in the air, they all possess bones which are more or less pneumatic— that is, contain air-cavities, to lessen the weight of the skeleton.
PopularScience_18900101_0036_003_0011.xml
article
389
389,390,391,392,393,394,395,396,397
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THE EFFECT OF CAVE LIFE ON ANIMALS, AND ITS BEARING ON THE EVOLUTION THEORY.
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A. S. PACKARD
THE main interest in studies on cave life centers in the obvious bearing of the facts upon the theory of descent. The conditions of existence in caverns, subterranean streams, and deep wells are so marked and unlike those which environ the great majority of organisms, that their effects on the animals which have been able to adapt themselves to such conditions at once arrest the attention of the observer.
PopularScience_18900101_0036_003_0012.xml
article
397
397,398,399,400
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THE CHINESE THEORY OF EVOLUTION.
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ADELE M. FIELDE
NOT long ago I engaged a new Chinese teacher, Mr. Khu, and as I was his first foreign acquaintance, as he had never tampered with books of Western origin, and as he was said to have made a special study of the occult sciences and to be devoutly religious, I considered him a treasure-trove.
PopularScience_18900101_0036_003_0013.xml
article
400
400,401,402,403,404,405,406,407
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SKETCH OF ALEXANDER WILSON.
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A PECULIAR interest attaches to the lives and labors of pioneers. The circumstances which led to the discovery of a new continent, the first application of one of the forces of nature to the service of man, the making of the first instrument for viewing the stars, and the first description of the animals, plants, or physical features of a country, always have eager readers.
PopularScience_18900101_0036_003_0014.xml
article
408
408,409
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CORRESPONDENCE.
FARMING AND THE TARIFF.
A REMONSTRANCE.
ENVIRONMENT AND THE REPRODUCTIVE POWER OF ANIMAIS.
A CORRECTION.
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DEAR SIR: The article in your November issue, by Joel Benton, on “The Decadence of Farming,” greatly interested me, as it must every lover of our country, and it suggested several questions which I believe should be considered, that we may get at the facts.
PopularScience_18900101_0036_003_0015.xml
article
410
410,411,412,413
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
TOLSTOI'S "CONFESSION"
THE LAND QUESTION.
THE TWENTIETH BIRTHDAY OF “NATURE."
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AMONG the numerous writings from the pen of Count Tolstoi which have of late been made accessible to the English reader is one entitled “My Confession.” In this work the author tells us that, having in his youth led the life of a pleasure-loving man of the world, and in his maturer years of a literary man in considerable repute, he woke up in middle life, when all his outward circumstances were highly prosperous, to find that life to him seemed to possess no meaning and no value.
PopularScience_18900101_0036_003_0016.xml
article
413
413,414,415,416,417,418,419,420,421,422,423
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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Two years ago Mr. Wells contributed to “The Popular Science Monthly” a series of articles entitled “Recent Economic Disturbances.” They elicited so much comment and discussion that the author now presents them as a book. In so doing he has brought his record of fact down to date, and extended his review so as not merely to treat the economic derangements which date from 1873-’74, but to include the economic history of the past three decades.
PopularScience_18900101_0036_003_0017.xml
article
423
423,424,425,426,427,428,429,430
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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The American Forestry Association.— The American Forestry Congress at its eighth annual meeting, held in Philadelphia in October, changed its name to Association. The meeting was opened with an address by the Hon. Carl Schurz, in which he narrated the difficulties he encountered from the opposition of Congressmen when, as Secretary of the Interior, he endeavored to protect the forests on the public lands against timber thieves.
PopularScience_18900101_0036_003_0018.xml
article
430
430,431,432,433
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NOTES.
OBITUARY NOTES.
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ATTENTION has been called, in letters written by Mr. James R. Skilton to the Mayor of Brooklyn, to the dangers that are hidden in the pipes through which water-gas is conveyed into houses and in the meters. The pipes and the meters are often—it would hardly be too much to say, usually—leaky, and as the escaping gas, largely carbonic oxide, while extremely poisonous, is imperceptible to the senses, great harm may be and often is wrought before the family are aware that anything is wrong.
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