Issue: 18890101

Tuesday, January 1, 1889
JANUARY 1889
3
True
34
Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Articles
cover
288
288,289
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_18890101_0034_003_0001.xml
article
289
289,290,291,292,293,294,295,296,297,298,299,300,301,302,303,304,305,306,307,308,309,310
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THE GUIDING-NEEDLE ON AN IRON SHIP.
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LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER T. A. LYONS
THERE is an agency that pervades the earth and is peculiarly resident in all its iron. It is magnetism. This force is akin to electricity, though not identical with it, and the manifestations of both are often similar. The small steel wire, scarcely larger than a sewing-needle, which constitutes the mariner’s compass—every iron vessel, even the huge steamship City of New York, and the earth itself—all have certain properties in common that warrant classing them as magnets; and, as the ship sails the earth and is guided by the compass, there is a very intimate though varying relationship between these three that should deeply interest those who traverse the ocean.
PopularScience_18890101_0034_003_0002.xml
article
310
310,311,312,313,314,315,316,317,318,319,320,321,322,323,324
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HOUSE-DRAINAGE FROM VARIOUS POINTS OF VIEW.
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JOHN S. BILLINGS
IN the year 1596 there was published in London a pamphlet entitled “A new discourse of a stale subject; called the Metamorphosis of Ajax. Written by Misacmps,” which was followed in the same year by a second pamphlet entitled “An Anatomy of the Metamorpho-sed Ajax, wherein, by a tripartite method, is plainly, openly and demonstratively declared, explained and eliquidated by Pen, Plot, and Precept, how unsavory places may be made sweet, noisome places made wholesome, filthy places made cleanly.
PopularScience_18890101_0034_003_0003.xml
article
324
324,325,326,327,328,329,330
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TOWN-LIFE AS A CAUSE OF DEGENERACY.*
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G. B. BARRON
IT may be readily supposed that the conditions of life and their general surroundings must largely influence and materially affect the physical or constitutional characteristics of town-dwellers. At the onset, then, I venture to advance the proposition that the “vital force” of the town-dweller is inferior to the “vital force” of the countryman.
PopularScience_18890101_0034_003_0004.xml
article
330
330,331,332,333,334,335,336,337,338,339,340,341
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SEA-LIONS AND FUR-SEALS.
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W. H. LARRABEE
THE animals of the seal-kind include two groups or families which, with a general similarity of structure, exhibit quite distinct features in their appearance, habits, and movements. The order to which they belong is named Pinnipedia, from the structure of the paws, which are webbed down to the ends of the fingers, and in one of the families beyond them.
PopularScience_18890101_0034_003_0005.xml
article
341
341,342,343,344,345,346,347,348,349,350,351,352,353,354,355,356
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GENIUS AND TALENT.
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GRANT ALLEN
LET it be granted that a vast deal of nonsense has been talked everywhere in this oblate spheroid of ours about almost every conceivable subject. Yet about none has a vaster amount of nonsense been talked before the tribunal of literature than about the famous old forensic case of Genius versus Talent.
PopularScience_18890101_0034_003_0006.xml
article
357
357,358,359,360,361,362,363,364,365,366,367
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INVENTIONAL GEOMETRY.
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EDWARD R. SHAW
INVENTIONAL geometry is the name given to a series of carefully graded problems, thought out and arranged by that able mathematical teacher, William George Spencer, the father of the distinguished philosopher. The little book was published in this country in 1876.*
PopularScience_18890101_0034_003_0007.xml
article
367
367,368,369,370,371,372,373,374,375,376,377,378,379
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SCIENCE AND ITS ACCUSERS.
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W. D. LE SUEUR
NOT many months ago we had in a single number of a leading English review—the “Contemporary”—no less than two articles by able writers lamenting the disintegrating action of science on morality and religion. The first of these was from the pen of the eminent Belgian publicist, M. Emile de Laveleye, and was entitled “The Future of Religion”; the second, contributed by Miss Frances Power Cobbe, dealt in a trenchant and aggressive manner with “The Scientific Spirit of the Age.”
PopularScience_18890101_0034_003_0008.xml
article
380
380,381,382,383,384,385
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THE SUANETIANS AND THEIR HOME.*
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DOUGLAS W. FRESHFIELD
A NEW recreation-ground is wanted for those of our countrymen who, without being travelers by profession, find pleasure and refreshment in rough travel among primitive people, in mountain scenery and glacier air, in that sense of adventure and discovery which is afforded only by unknown countries or virgin heights, and on unmapped snowy chains.
PopularScience_18890101_0034_003_0009.xml
article
385
385,386,387,388,389,390,391,392,393,394,395,396
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THE HISTORY OF A DOCTRINE.*
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PROF. S. P. LANGLEY
THE first five years of this century are notable in the history of radiant energy, not only for the work of Leslie, and for the observation by Wollaston, Ritter, and others, of the so-called “chemical” rays beyond the violet, but for the appearance of Young’s papers, re-establishing the undulatory theory, which he indeed considered in regard to light, but which was obviously destined to affect most powerfully the theory of radiant energy in general.
PopularScience_18890101_0034_003_0010.xml
article
396
396,397,398,399
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GAUSS AND THE ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH.
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WE have been favored with the following interesting letter, giving some facts in relation to Prof. Gauss in addition to the sketch of this distinguished mathematician which appeared in “The Popular Science Monthly” for September, 1888, and inclosing the appended extracts from letters by Gauss in regard to his invention of a form of electric telegraph:
PopularScience_18890101_0034_003_0011.xml
article
399
399,400,401,402,403,404
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THE SACRIFICE OF EDUCATION.
A PROTEST.
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AS an indication of the present state of feeling in England toward the system of public education in that country, and especially toward the abuse of examinations, we reprint the following vigorous protest, which is signed by over a hundred professors and teachers, about seventy members of Parliament, and by members of the nobility, clergymen, and others, to the total number of four hundred.
PopularScience_18890101_0034_003_0012.xml
article
405
405,406,407,408,409,410
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SKETCH OF MOSES ASHLEY CURTIS.
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THE Rev. MOSES ASHLEY CURTIS, D.D., presents the example of a clergyman who, doing hard pioneer missionary work in the mountains of North Carolina, and caring actively and efficiently for the wants of his parish, brought the botany of his State to a full development.
PopularScience_18890101_0034_003_0013.xml
article
411
411,412,413,414,415
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CORRESPONDENCE.
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MR. MCGEE, in his article on “Paleolithic Man in America,” in the November issue, falls into an unfortunate error in stating that I had found twenty-five thousand specimens of true paleolithic implements in the gravel. The number found is about four hundred, and this represents twelve years of most laborious search for them.
PopularScience_18890101_0034_003_0014.xml
article
416
416,417,418,419
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
THE ABUSE OF EXAMINATIONS.
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IT is idle to be continually repeating that this is a very wonderful age; but we may with good reason congratulate ourselves that science has now reached a point that insures to the human race an ever-increasing mastery over the powers and resources of nature, and that ought, with any kind of right management, to be productive of better modes of life from year to year, not for the few only but for all.
PopularScience_18890101_0034_003_0015.xml
article
419
419,420,421,422,423,424,425,426
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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THE discussion of the subject of this volume is considerably amplified from that given in the original work, with a more precise classification and fuller detail of examples. The subject is confessed to be beset with peculiar difficulties, arising from the vague and indefinable character of the human feelings, which can not be described directly or accurately analyzed; it can be approached only by the way of wide comparison and illustration.
PopularScience_18890101_0034_003_0016.xml
article
426
426,427,428,429,430,431
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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Fast Ocean Passages.—It was about fifty years ago, with the introduction of iron ships and the screw-propeller, that the era of rapid steamboat traveling began. The paddle-wheel steamer Great Western sailed from Bristol, England, April 8, 1838, and reached New York April 23d.
PopularScience_18890101_0034_003_0017.xml
article
431
431,432,433
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NOTES.
OBITUARIES.
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THE statistics of the Japanese Empire for 1887 show that commercial enterprise is developing there in a remarkable degree. The foreign trade of the country has increased more than 86 per cent in ten years. In connection with the addition of 151 miles of railway to the 370 miles before built, the pertinacity with which the Japanese insist upon furnishing their own capital, and not borrowing from abroad, is remarked upon.
PopularScience_18890101_0034_003_0018.xml