Issue: 18870401

Friday, April 1, 1887
APRIL, 1887
6
True
30
Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Articles
cover
720
720,721
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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721
721,722,723,724,725,726,727,728,729,730,731,732
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BRAIN-FORCING IN CHILDHOOD.*
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WILLIAM A. HAMMOND
NOT very long ago a lady of this city brought her little daughter, twelve years of age, to see me professionally. The child was on her way to school, and had with her a large satchel full of books. She was pale, tall, and thin. The muscles of her face twitched convulsively, and she could not keep her hands and feet still.
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article
733
733,734,735,736,737,738,739,740,741,742,743
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THE HISTORY OF A DELUSION.
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M. G. VALBERT.
IN the year of grace 1838, MM. d’Ennery and Anicet Bourgeois presented at the Théâtre l’Ambigu a drama entitled “Gaspard Hauser.” In the same year “The Poor Idiot of the Cellar of Elberg” was played at le Gaîté, the Poor Idiot being also Gaspard or Caspar Hauser.
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article
743
743,744,745,746,747,748,749,750,751,752,753,754,755,756
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ASTRONOMY WITH AN OPERA-GLASS.
THE STARS OF SPRING.
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GARRETT P. SERVISS.
THERE was never a time when the heavens were studied by so many amateur astronomers as at present. In every civilized country many excellent telescopes are owned and used, often to very good purpose, by persons who are not practical astronomers, but who wish to see for themselves the marvels of the sky, and who occasionally stumble upon something that is new even to professional star-gazers.
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article
757
757,758,759,760,761,762,763,764,765
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SOCIAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL INEQUALITY.
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HENRY DWIGHT CHAPIN
THE subject of the hour is the social problem. Viewed in the light of the pressing questions demanding settlement—questions really of life and death—the new science of sociology overshadows all others in importance. The air is full of the angry clamor raised by different cliques and classes, all arguing from the standpoint of their own interests.
PopularScience_18870401_0030_006_0005.xml
article
765
765,766,767,768,769,770,771,772,773,774,775,776,777
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INFECTION AND DISINFECTION.
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ROBSON ROOSE
THE enormous variety of subjects contained in medical literature necessitates the use of a corresponding number of terms, the majority of which have a certain and well-known meaning; but it would be difficult to find two words more wanting in the element of precision, and more loosely used, than those placed at the head of this article.
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article
778
778,779,780,781,782,783,784,785,786,787,788
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ON MELODY IN SPEECH.
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F. WEBEK
THERE is an infinite variety of interesting and pleasing sounds in Nature’s music around us, that may be noted by an attentive ear; these sounds are mostly melodious and harmonious, or in some harmonious connection, and form exact intervals and chords.
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article
789
789,790,791,792,793,794,795,796,797,798,799,800,801,802,803
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SCIENTIFIC AND PSEUDO-SCIENTIFIC REALISM.
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PROFESSOR T. H. HUXLEY.
NEXT to undue precipitation in anticipating the results of pending investigations, the intellectual sin which is commonest and most hurtful to those who devote themselves to the increase of knowledge is the omission to profit by the experience of their predecessors recorded in the history of science and philosophy.
PopularScience_18870401_0030_006_0008.xml
article
803
803,804,805,806,807,808,809,810
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BIRD-MIGRATION.
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BARTON W. EVERMANN.
NINE hundred and forty-one species and sub-species of birds are now recognized by ornithologists as belonging to the avi-fauna of North America. Eighty-two of these may be regarded as stragglers from other countries, and their occurrence in North America as purely accidental.
PopularScience_18870401_0030_006_0009.xml
article
810
810,811,812,813,814
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A REMARKABLE EXPLOSION.
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PROFESSOR L. R. F. GRIFFIN.
MODEEN industrial operations necessarily employ great quantities of powerful explosives, of which gunpowder and some of the forms of nitroglycerin are the most important. Nitroglycerin, for convenience in handling, is now commonly absorbed by Bichmond infusorial earth, and is then known as dynamite.
PopularScience_18870401_0030_006_0010.xml
article
814
814,815,816,817,818,819,820
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THE SCIENTIFIC AGE.f†
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DR. WERNER SIEMENS.
THE Association of German Naturalists and Physicians, which is so numerously and brilliantly represented here, having sixty years ago raised the banner of free investigation in our fatherland, has since, by its meetings, held from place to place, made the sciences, which had been previously pursued only in the narrow circle of experts, accessible to the life of the public, and therefore serviceable.
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article
821
821,822,823,824,825,826,827,828,829
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ON THE TRUE AIM OF PHYSIOLOGY.*
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PROFESSOR W. PREYER
FOR a long while I have felt the desire to answer in a popular treatise the question, What ways and aims ought physiology to pursue? Most naturalists consider the explanation of all phenomena, including those of living bodies, only satisfactory if mechanical—that is to say, if, in strict logical sequence, it is based upon the principles of modern physics as taught by Galileo nearly three centuries ago.
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article
829
829,830,831
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TURPENTINE-FARMING.
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L. W. ROBARTS.
FINDING myself in the pine-region of Southeast Georgia, and thinking that some information on the subject above named may not prove uninteresting to your readers, I will endeavor to tell to them that which has been imparted to me by those thoroughly conversant with the whole business.
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article
832
832,833,834,835
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RUSTIC SUPERSTITION.
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THAT “the days of superstition are past” is an announcement frequently and triumphantly made by those who advocate the disestablishment or destruction of any institution or belief that happens not to be in accordance with their own interests or theories.
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article
835
835,836,837,838,839,840
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SKETCH OF LEO LESQUEREUX.
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L. R. MCCABE.
AMERICAN science owes an incalculable debt to the Geneva Revolutionary Council of 1848, that suppressed the Academy of Neufchâtel and sent to our shores Agassiz, Guyot, and Lesquereux. In the heart of Switzerland’s mountain grandeur this illustrious trio first saw the light and drank of that love of Nature which, deepening with the years, peculiarly linked their lives.
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article
841
841,842
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CORRESPONDENCE.
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MORE ABOUT THE “JOINT-SNAKE.” Editor Popular Science Monthly: SIR: In the January number of the “Monthly” one of your correspondents enters the list as a champion of the jointsnake tradition, and adds the details of a personal encounter with the problematic ophidian.
PopularScience_18870401_0030_006_0016.xml
article
842
842,843,844,845
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
SCIENCE AND STATESMANSHIP.
THE GROWTH OF INDUSTRIALISM.
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IN the January number of the “Contemporary Review,” Madame Adam has an article entitled “Science in Politics,” the main contention of which appears to be that science and politics make a very bad mixture. The proof of this position she finds in the evil influence exerted, as she believes, by the late M. Paul Bert on contemporary French politics.
PopularScience_18870401_0030_006_0017.xml
article
845
845,846,847,848,849,850,851,852,853,854
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS BECEIVED.
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THE GEOGRAPHICAL AND GEOLOGICAL DISTRIBUTION OF ANIMALS. By Professor ANGELO HEILPRIN. “International Scientific Series.” Vol. LVII. D. Appleton & Co. Pp. 435. Price, $2. THIS volume sustains the high character of the International Scientific Series, and is a timely one, as the need of a compact work on this fascinating study has long been recognized.
PopularScience_18870401_0030_006_0018.xml
article
854
854,855,856,857,858,859,860,861,862,863
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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The Glass-Snake.—We publish in this number of the “Monthly” two letters respecting the so-called joint-snake, of which the one by Dr. Hammond gives a clear and correct account of the natural history of the reptile, and ought to dissipate all doubts as to the origin and value of the stories that have been told respecting its peculiarities.
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863
863,864
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NOTES.
OBITUARY NOTES.
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THE “Lancet” sees in precocity simply the early or premature use of the higher cerebral centers, particularly those which stand in near relation to the senses. Even when the higher intellectual centers are affected, the excitation may usually be traced through channels which originate in the senses.
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advertisement
865
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Advertisement
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