Issue: 18870201

Tuesday, February 1, 1887
FEBRUARY, 1887
4
True
30
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Articles
article
1
1,433,434,435,436,437,438,439,440,441,442,443,444,445,446,447,448,449,450,451
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THE LAWS OF HABIT.
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PROFESSOR WILLIAM JAMES
WHEN we look at living creatures from an outward point of view, one of the first things that strike us is that they are bundles of habits. In wild animals, the usual round of daily behavior seems a necessity implanted at birth; in animals domesticated, and especially in man, it seems, to a great extent, to be the result of education.
PopularScience_18870201_0030_004_0001.xml
cover
433
433
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_18870201_0030_004_0002.xml
article
451
451,452,453,454,455,456,457,458,459
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SCIENCE IN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION.
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DANIEL GREENLEAF THOMPSON
LET us now turn our attention to those higher seminaries of learning, which, though often assisted by public funds, or patronized in one way or another by the state, are not exclusively state institutions. Wherever a college or university happens to be under state control, precisely the same principles should obtain regarding the teaching of religion as we have found applicable in the case of inferior schools.
PopularScience_18870201_0030_004_0003.xml
article
459
459,460,461,462,463,464,465,466,467,468,469,470,471,472,473
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THE SOUTH-AFRICAN DIAMOND-MINES.
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IT was a pleasant fancy of a writer in the “Cornhill Magazine,” to argue for the plausibility of the fairy-story of the princess from whose pretty lips “fell diamonds, both in speaking and in singing, and even in silence,” when she merely smiled.
PopularScience_18870201_0030_004_0004.xml
article
474
474,475,476,477,478,479,480,481,482,483,484,485,486,487,488,489,490,491,492,493
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MATERIALISM AND MORALITY.
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W. S. LILLY.
"WORDS are grown so false that I am loath to prove reason with them," says Viola in "Twelfth Night." The saying constantly comes to my mind in dealing with the philosophical controversies of the present day. Rigorous definition, careful analysis, precise classification, are no longer in favor.
PopularScience_18870201_0030_004_0005.xml
article
493
493,494,495,496,497,498,499,500,501,502,503,504,505,506
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SCIENCE AND MORALS: A REPLY.
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PROFESSOR T. H. HUXLEY
IN spite of long and, perhaps, not unjustifiable hesitation, I begin to think that there must be something in telepathy. For evidence, which I may not disregard, is furnished by the last number of the "Fortnightly Review," that, among the hitherto undiscovered endowments of the human species, there may be a power even more wonderful than the mystic faculty by which the esoterically Buddhistic sage “upon the farthest mountain in Cathay” reads the inmost thoughts of a dweller within the homely circuit of the London postal district.
PopularScience_18870201_0030_004_0006.xml
article
507
507,508,509,510,511,512,513,514
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SOME POINTS ON THE LAND QUESTION.
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OLIVER B. BUNCE
IN a recent number of a religious periodical there occurred the following sentence: "There can be no question as to the abstract proposition that land is not a proper subject for private ownership; that labor alone creates wealth, and labor does not create land."
PopularScience_18870201_0030_004_0007.xml
article
514
514,515,516,517,518,519,520
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FETICHISM OR ANTHROPOMORPHISM.
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GEORGE PELLEW
IN the recent controversy between Mr. Spencer and Mr. Harrison on the subject of the relation between science and religion, the question of the historical priority of fetichism over spiritism or anthropomorphism was discussed at some length, and was somewhat dogmatically determined in the negative, by Mr. Spencer.
PopularScience_18870201_0030_004_0008.xml
article
520
520,521,522,523,524,525,526,527,528,529
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MISGOVERNMENT OF GREAT CITIES.
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FRANK P. CRANDON
SERIOUS as are the evils under which municipal governments are laboring, great as are the embarrassments growing out of our conservatism, the opposition of vested rights, and the clamor of charlatans and demagogues, to whom the establishment of a thoroughly honest and efficient government would be the loss of their entire stock in trade, and difficult of application as are the principles on which we must rest our plans, still I do not believe that the present situation is hopeless or remediless.
PopularScience_18870201_0030_004_0009.xml
article
529
529,530,531,532,533,534,535,536,537,538,539
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FULGURITES, OR LIGHTNING-HOLES.
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GEORGE P. MERRILL
THE peculiar and often disastrous results attendant upon an electric discharge have been dwelt upon since time immemorial. To even briefly refer to the numerous recorded instances of the destruction of life and property by the discharge of “heaven’s artillery” would far exceed the limits of this paper.
PopularScience_18870201_0030_004_0010.xml
article
539
539,540,541,542,543
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VIEWS OF LIFE IN THE CRAZY MOUNTAINS.
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MRS. E. D. W. HATCH
SOME months ago, looking in the direction of the foot-hills, I saw a "jack-rabbit" making its long leaps toward its home, white as the snow around it; but for its sudden springs in the air, it would hardly have been distinguished from the earth's covering.
PopularScience_18870201_0030_004_0011.xml
article
543
543,544,545,546,547
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MASSAGE.
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LADY JOHN MANNERS
IN the present day, when we hear so much of the wear and tear of daily work and worry, and when the preservation and restoration of health are of supreme importance to those who take the foremost rank in the battle of life, it may not be unprofitable to cast a glance on the means employed by the nations of the Orient and of antiquity to develop and maintain the vigor of the body.
PopularScience_18870201_0030_004_0012.xml
article
547
547,548,549,550,551,552,553
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SKETCH OF CHARLES C. ABBOTT.
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THE name of Dr. Abbott is familiar to the readers of the “Monthly” as that of the author of papers showing him to be on the best of terms with Nature, as well as of an archæologist who finds history where ordinary diggers would find only gravel and river-shells.
PopularScience_18870201_0030_004_0013.xml
article
554
554,555
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CORRESPONDENCE.
“THE JOINT-SNAKE IDIOCY.”
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IN "The Popular Science Monthly” for December, 1886, Dr. Felix L. Oswald, in discussing “Zoölogical Superstitions,” speaks incidentally of the “joint-snake.” He says: “The joint-snake idiocy, on the other hand, though knocked to pieces a hundred times, persists in reviving with symbolic promptitude.
PopularScience_18870201_0030_004_0014.xml
article
555
555,556,557,558
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
PROPHETS OF EVIL.
A STRANGE SIGHT IN SOUTH AFRICA.
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IT is remarkable how many able writers are devoting themselves now-a-days to proving that, under the influence of the scientific and philosophical theories most in vogue, modern society is rushing to destruction. It is also remarkable that, in spite of the clearness with which they discern the danger, not one of them comes forward with a single practical suggestion as to how it may be averted.
PopularScience_18870201_0030_004_0015.xml
article
558
558,559,560,561,562,563,564,565,566,567,568
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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HISTORY OF THE PACIFIC STATES OF NORTH AMERICA. By HUBERT HOWE BANCROFT. Vol. XXIV. Oregon, Vol. I. San Francisco: The History Company. Pp. 789. THE more remote events in Oregon affairs have already been given in the "History of the Northwest Coast." The later volumes, to which this one belongs, deal with events that occurred within the memory of men now living. They have been wrought out from original sources, and contain a large proportion of facts which have never before appeared in print.
PopularScience_18870201_0030_004_0016.xml
article
568
568,569,570,571,572,573,574,575
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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Methods of Arrow-Release.—Professor E. S. Morse, while shooting the bow and arrow with a Japanese friend, was surprised to find that the Japanese practice in handling the weapon was totally unlike ours. IIe then began collecting data illustrating the various methods of releasing the arrow from the bow as practiced by different races; and in time became convinced that the subject had importance, and the pursuit of it might lead to interesting results in tracing the affinities of past races.
PopularScience_18870201_0030_004_0017.xml
article
575
575,576,577
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NOTES.
OBITUARY NOTES.
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A SPECIMEN of the vibikari, or sacred snake of Japan, in Dr. Stradling’s collection at Watford, England, recently gave birth to between sixty and seventy young ones. Some fifty living and still-born snakelets were collected, and it was believed that at least a dozen more had been destroyed by other snakes in the cage.
PopularScience_18870201_0030_004_0018.xml