Issue: 18860101

Friday, January 1, 1886
JANUARY, 1886
3
True
28
Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Articles
cover
287
287,288,289
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_18860101_0028_003_0001.xml
article
289
289,290,291,292,293,294,295
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INOCULATION AGAINST HYDROPHOBIA.
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M. LOUIS PASTEUE
THE prevention of rabies, as I have described it, in my own name and the names of my collaborators, in previous notes, certainly constitutes a real progress in the study of that malady, a progress which was, however, more scientific than practical. Its application was precarious.
PopularScience_18860101_0028_003_0002.xml
article
296
296,297,298,299,300,301,302,303,304,305,306,307
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THE ORIGIN OF PRIMITIVE MONEY.
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HORATIO HALE
THE European colonists who first became acquainted with the Indian tribes of the region now composing the United States and Canada were surprised and not a little interested when they found that these barbarous clans had, in one respect, a marked advantage over the great semi-civilized communities of Central and South America.
PopularScience_18860101_0028_003_0003.xml
article
307
307,308,309,310,311,312,313,314
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PROGRESS IN TORNADO-PREDICTION.
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WILLIAM A. EDDY
DURING the first part of 1884 the United States Signal Service began to pay special attention to the question of tornado-prediction. The development of the science was rapid under the active supervision of Lieutenant John P. Finley, having charge of that department of the service.
PopularScience_18860101_0028_003_0004.xml
article
315
315,316,317,318,319,320,321,322,323,324
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THE VARIETIES OF THE HUMAN SPECIES.
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PROFESSOR WILLIAM H. FLOWER
THE most ordinary observation is sufficient to demonstrate the fact that certain groups of men are strongly marked from others by definite characters common to all members of the group, and transmitted regularly to their descendants by the laws of inheritance.
PopularScience_18860101_0028_003_0005.xml
article
325
325,326,327,328,329,330,331,332,33,334
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COMMUNAL SOCIETIES.
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CHARLES MORRIS
IN the paper on “Neuter Insects,” recently published in “The Popular Science Monthly,”* the argument on certain phases of animal evolution there presented was not offered as a complete one. For a full exposition of the development of ant and bee intelligence, this subject needs to be considered from another point of view, and the present paper is intended as, in a partial sense, a sequel to the one above named.
PopularScience_18860101_0028_003_0006.xml
article
334
334,335,336,337,338,339,340,341,342
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FISH OUT OF WATER.
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GRANT ALLEN
STROLLING one day in what is euphemistically termed, in equatorial latitudes, “the cool of the evening,” along a tangled tropical American field-path, through a low region of lagoons and watercourses, my attention happened to be momentarily attracted from the monotonous pursuit of the nimble mosquito by a small animal scuttling along irregularly before me, as if in a great hurry to get out of my way before I could turn him into an excellent specimen.
PopularScience_18860101_0028_003_0007.xml
article
342
342,343,344,345,346,347,348,349,350,351,352
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THE FLOWER OR THE LEAF.
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DR. MARY PUTNAM-JACOBI
THE comments made by Miss Youmans,* upon a single remark in my article on “Primary Education,” show how much can be unfolded out of an apparently limited subject, when all its bearings are thoroughly discussed. Already this discussion trenches upon several philosophical principles which involve much more than the apparently trivial question whether children should begin the study of botany by the flower or the leaf.
PopularScience_18860101_0028_003_0008.xml
article
353
353,354,355,356,357,358,359,360,361
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THE STUDY OF THE RELATIONS OF THINGS.
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ELIZA A. YOUMANS
EVERY reader of the preceding article will recognize that it is one which I can not let pass as a final statement of the subject. Mrs. Jacobi’s very first sentence is so misleading as to put me in a wrong relation to this discussion. She says, “The comments made by Miss Youman’s upon a single remark in my article on primary education,” etc. ; the implication of which is that I had a very slender basis for getting up a controversy.
PopularScience_18860101_0028_003_0009.xml
article
362
362,363,364,365,366,367
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AGATIZED AND JASPERIZED WOOD OF ARIZONA.
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GEORGE F. KUNZ
UNDOUBTEDLY one of the greatest of American wonders is the silicified forest in Arizona, known as Chalcedony Park—a park only in name, however, for the giant trees which once grew there have long since fallen and silicified into agate and jasper. It is situated eight miles south of Corriza, a station on the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad, in Apache County, Arizona, twenty-four miles southeast of Holbrook.
PopularScience_18860101_0028_003_0010.xml
article
367
367,368,369,370,371
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NONCONFORMITY.
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HERBERT SPENCER
NOTHING like that which we now call Nonconformity can be traced in societies of simple types. Devoid of the knowledge and the mental tendencies which lead to criticism and scepticism, the savage passively accepts whatever his seniors assert. Custom in the form of established belief, as well as in the form of established usage, is sacred with him: dissent from it is unheard of.
PopularScience_18860101_0028_003_0011.xml
article
371
371,372,373,374,375,376,377
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A NEW FIELD OF AMERICAN HISTORY.
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WE have hitherto been accustomed to treat the history of the United States as consisting primarily of the history of the Atlantic portion. When it has become necessary in the progress of the review to advert to the history of other parts of the continent, the subject has been considered as related to the history of the Eastern States, and subordinated to it.
PopularScience_18860101_0028_003_0012.xml
article
377
377,378,379,380,381,382,383,384,385,386,387,388
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NATURAL HEIRSHIP : OR, ALL THE WORLD AKIN.
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REV. HENEY KENDALL
THE number of a man’s ancestors doubles in every generation as his descent is traced upward. In the first generation he reckons only two ancestors, his father and mother. In the second generation the two are converted into four, since he had two grandfathers and two grandmothers.
PopularScience_18860101_0028_003_0013.xml
article
388
388,389,390,391,392,393,394
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SCIENCE IN ITS USEFUL APPLICATIONS.
PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS BEFORE THE INSTITUTE OF CHEMISTRY.
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WILLIAM ODLING
BY the attainment of our incorporation by royal charter, in lieu of the articles of association by which we have, until now, been banded together, we become for the first time an officially recognized professional body, known officially to Government, and both to municipal and to other professional bodies.
PopularScience_18860101_0028_003_0014.xml
article
395
395,396,397,398,399,400
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THE PHYSIOLOGY OF THE FEET.
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T. S. ELLIS
DISREGARDING the action of those parts not affecting the feet, the act of walking may, as I think, be thus described: The foot put forward should reach the ground when nearly flat; the toes, the organs of feeling, should be the first to reach it, not the heel, which could not be without some concussion, however slight.
PopularScience_18860101_0028_003_0015.xml
article
401
401,402,403,404,405,406
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SKETCH OF FRANK BUCKLAND.
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FRANCIS TREVELYAN BUCKLAND, who was almost universally known as Frank Buckland, was the eldest son of Canon William Buckland, of Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford, afterward Dean of Westminster, and author of the “Buckland Bridgewater Treatise,” and was born in Oxford, December 17, 1826.
PopularScience_18860101_0028_003_0016.xml
article
407
407,408,409
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CORRESPONDENCE.
SCIENTIFIC FREEDOM.
THE GENESIS OF A TORNADO.
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I READ the first few pages of the Bishop of Carlisle’s essay on the “Uniformity of Nature,” in the last number of this magazine, with a lively expectation that some of the fog and uncertainty left hanging around the question by the debaters of the “Metaphysical Society” was to be cleared up.
PopularScience_18860101_0028_003_0017.xml
article
410
410,411
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
THE DECLINE OF THE GHOST.
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A LONDON correspondent of the “Boston Herald” makes the significant and, from our point of view, encouraging statement that, in all the Christmas annuals—and their name is legion—published this season, there is hardly to be found a single ghost-story.
PopularScience_18860101_0028_003_0018.xml
article
412
412,413,414,415,416,417,418,419,420
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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THE great life-work of Herbert Spencer, the “Philosophy of Evolution,” advances toward completion, but it has moved slowly of late. Persistent ill-health and occupation with other subjects, and other parts of the system than that immediately in hand, have considerably delayed the appearance of the present volume.
PopularScience_18860101_0028_003_0019.xml
article
420
420,421,422,423,424,425,426,427,428,429,430
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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Prehistoric Human Remains in Mexico.—Mariano de la Barcena describes in the “American Naturalist” some human remains that have been found in the hill Peñon de los Baños, near the city of Mexico, imbedded in a hard rock of silicified calcareous tufa. The cranium, with the upper and lower maxillæ and fragments of the collar-bone, vertebrae, ribs, and bones from the upper and lower limbs, are exposed, and present a yellowish appearance and the characteristic aspects of fossilization.
PopularScience_18860101_0028_003_0020.xml
article
430
430,431,432
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NOTES.
OBITUARY NOTES.
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ACCORDING to “Wood and Iron,” of the four hundred and thirteen species of trees found in the United States, the perfectly dry wood of sixteen species will sink in water. The heaviest of these is the black iron-wood of Southern Florida, which is thirty per cent heavier than water.
PopularScience_18860101_0028_003_0021.xml