Issue: 18840301

Saturday, March 1, 1884
MARCH, 1884
5
True
24
Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Articles
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57
57,577
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THE POPULAR SOIENOE MONTHLY.
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FROM MOHER TO MAN.
PROFESSOR OF PHYSIOLOGY I~ THE WOMAR'S MEDICAL COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANLA
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FKANCES EMILY WHITE,
MAN has long been regarded not only as a compendium of the entire animal kingdom, but as an epitome of the universe—as Nature’s short-hand expression of a long-continued history begun with the beginning condensation of the nebulæ, and still going on to the development of higher types of humanity.
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587
587,588,589,590,591,592,593,594,595,596,597
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COLLEGE ATHLETICS.
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS IN YALE COLLEGE.
EL.-EVILS AND THEIR REMEDIES.
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EUGENE L. RICHARDS
WTTH regard to the evils of the present system of college athletics it must be remembered that the best system will not be free from all evil. No human system can be free from evil. Even the divine government of the world does not exclude the existence of evil.
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598
598,599,600,601,602,603,604,605,606
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GREEN SUNS AND RED SUNSETS.
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W. H. LAKEABEE
THE whole world enjoyed, during the closing months of 1883 and through January, 1884, the spectacle of a succession of sunsets and sunrises marked by a brilliant, gorgeous red coloration. The phenomenon, if it had been only for a day or two, might not have excited any particular remark, for in the United States the sight of a brilliantly-colored sunset is not at all unusual ; but when it was found to be continuous for months, and to extend to every part of the earth, the impression became nearly universal that something uncommon was going on in our atmosphere or in space.
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606
606,607,608,609,610,611,612,613,614,615,616,617,618
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THE ANCESTRY OF BIRDS.
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PROFESSOR GRANT ALLEN
SEATED on the dry hill-side here, by the belted blue Mediterranean, I have picked up from the ground a bit of blanched and moldering bone, well cleaned to my hand by the unconscious friendliness of the busy ants ; and looking closely at it I recognize it at once, with a sympathetic sigh, for the solid welded tail-piece of some departed British tourist swallow.
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618,619,620,621,622,623,624,625,626,627,628
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MEXICO AND ITS ANTIQUITIES*
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THE Mexican Republic extends from the fifteenth to the thirtieth degree of north latitude, and embraces an area of about 750,000 square miles. It is traversed by the continuation of the Cordillera of South America, here called the Sierra Madre, which trends northwesterly from the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, and varies in height from a moderate elevation in the southern States of Chiapas and Oaxaca to a mean height in the nineteenth degree of latitude of 9,000 feet, with the peaks of Orizaba and Popocatepetl—“ the culminating point of North America "—rising to the elevations of 17,200 and 17,720 feet respectively.
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628,629,630,631,632,633,634,635,636,637,638,639
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THE REMEDIES OF NATURE.
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FELIX L. OSWALD, M. D.
THE progress of the healing art, as distinguished from certzsain sterile branches of medical science, can be best measured by the progress of our insight into the causes of special maladies. For the accidental discovery of a “ specific ” means generally nothing but the discovery of a method for suppressing special symptoms of a disease.
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639
639,640,641,642,643,644,645
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STUDY—PHYSIOLOGICALLY CONSIDERED.
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THE ultimate element by means of which those processes that constitute the mind are carried on, is the microscopic cell of the gray matter of the brain. These gray nerve-cells, with the delicate tissue in which they are imbedded, form a layer, from one sixth to one twelfth of an inch in thickness, on the surface of the brain.
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645
645,646,647,648,649,650,651,652,653,654,655,656,657,658,659
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FASHION AND DEFORMITY IN THE FEET.
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ADA H. KEPLEY
“ A WELL-FORMED foot,” says Chapman in “The American Drawing-Book,” “ is rarely to be met with in our day, from the lamentable distortion it is doomed to endure by the fashion of our shoes and boots. Instead of being allowed the same freedom as the fingers to exercise the purposes for which Nature intended them, the toes are cramped together, and are of little more value than if they were all in one ; their joints enlarged, stiffened, and distorted, forced and packed together, often overlapping one another in sad confusion, and wantonly placed beyond the power of service.
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659,660,661,662,663,664,665,666,667,668,669,670,671,672,673
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ON RAINBOWS
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JOHN TYNDALL, F.E.S.
THE oldest historic reference to the rainbow is known to all : “I do set my bow in the cloud, and it shall be for a token of a covenant between me and the earth. . . . And the bow shall be in the cloud ; and I shall look upon it, that I may remember the everlasting covenant between God and every living creature of all flesh that is upon the earth.
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674
674,675
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SCIENCE VERSUS THE CLASSICS.
PROFESSOR IN TUE STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
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C. A. EGGERT
A T the present stage of the discuss-ion as to the value of the training in the Latin and Greek languages and their literature, the testimony of Professor Preyer, of the University of Jena, is not without importance. Professor Preyer is interested, and he not alone among German professors, in the question of “ health and vigor versus disease and weakness ” of the German youth.
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676
676,677,678,679,680,681,682,683,684,685,686
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THE JURY SYSTEM.
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HENRY H. WILSON
THIS is an age in which ancestral faiths, traditional customs, and primitive institutions alike, are receiving the attacks of iconoclasts. These attacks are always vigorous, usually just, frequently learned, but sometimes hasty and ill-considered.
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686
686,687,688,689,690,691,692
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THE CHEMISTRY OF COOKERY.
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W. MATTIEU WILLIAMS
SINCE the publication of my last paper, I have learned the proper name of the Swiss compound there described as fondevin, according to my recollection of its pronunciation in Switzerland. In an old edition of Mrs. Rundell’s “ Domestic Cookery,” it is described as fondu.
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692
692,693,694
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SCIENCE AND SAFETY AT SEA.
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KICHAKD A. PBOCTOK
IN the autumn of 1879 the steamship Arizona, five thousand tons, at that time the swiftest ocean-going steamship in existence, was urging her way, at the rate of some fifteen knots an hour, on the homeward course from New York, whence she had sailed but a day or two before.
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695
695,696,697,698,699
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SKETCH OF OBMSBY MACKNIGHT MITCHEL.
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WITH the year 1842 practically commences the history of astronomical science in America. In that year, ORMSBY MACKNIGHT MITCHEL, a young graduate of West Point, and Professor of Mathematics at Cincinnati, having met with success in lecturing before his classes, was invited to give a course in the college hall.
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700,701
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CORRESPONDENCE.
A REPLY TO EDITORIAL STATEMENTS. Messrs. Editors :
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WHO shall decide when doctors disagree ?” Not long since was put forth the theory that the “ bite ” of the mosquito is a genuine antidote for malaria, and one of the arguments used to sustain the assertion was that Nature provides remedies alongside all forms of disease, and that, wherever malaria abounded, mosquitoes did much more abound, and were busily engaged, to the best of their ability, in injecting a tonic under the skin of poor aguestricken humanity, which would effectually cure the disease if the humane work of the winged surgeons was not interfered with ; and now comes Professor King, in the September number of your journal, with the startling claim that the mosquito is the very cause of malarial diseases !—and the problem, Shall we encourage or kill the insect ? is still unsolved.
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
COLLEGIATE INFLUENCE UPON THE LOWER EDUCATION.
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THERE is one aspect of the broad classical controversy of momentous importance, but which has been much neglected in the general discussion of the subject. "We refer to the relation of our collegiate system to the system of education in the schools of lower grade.
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LITERARY NOTICES.
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MR. FISKE has laid the reading public under many obligations by the reissue of these more recent papers, which embody his matured views on a wide and varied range of topics. Nothing need be said in commendation of the literary work of a writer who has been long recognized as unrivaled in the art of lucid, effective, and pleasing exposition.
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713,714
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PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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Proceedings of the Boston Society of Natural History. Vol. XXII. November, 1882, to February, 1883. Pp. 112, with Six Plates. Summary of Progress in Mineralogy In 1883. By H. Carvili Lewis, Philadelphia. Pp. 50. What shall we do for the Drunkard Î By Orpheus Everts, M.D. Cincinnati: Robert Clarke & Co. Pp. 56.
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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Sab-aerial Decay of Kocks.—Professor T. S. Hunt publishes, in the “American Journal of Science,” an elaborate paper on the “ Decay of Rocks,” in which he insists that recent geological studies afford evidence that a sub-aërial decay both of silicated crystalline and calcareous rocks has taken place universally and from the most ancient epochs, and that it was very extensive in pre-Cambrian times.
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NOTES.
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NEAR Mandan, in the neighborhood of the junction of the Hart and Missouri Rivers, are what appear to be two large cemeteries of an ancient race. One of them is composed of what are described as trenches filled with bones of man and beast, and covered with several feet of earth so as to form considerable mounds.
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