Issue: 18821201

Friday, December 1, 1882
DECEMBER, 1882
2
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22
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Articles
cover
143
143,144,145
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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PopularScience_18821201_0022_002_0001.xml
article
145
145,146,147,148,149,150,151,152,153,154,155,156
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MR GOLDWIN SMITH ON "TIlE DATA OF ETHICS."
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W. D. LE SUEUR
MUCH instruction has been drawn from the story of Naaman, the Syrian, who, when he went to the prophet Elisha, to be healed of his disease, expected that the man of God would “do some great thing,” and was greatly discouraged and offended when he merely recommended him to go through a strenuous course of ablution in the most convenient stream.
PopularScience_18821201_0022_002_0002.xml
article
156
156,157,158,159,160,161,162,163,164,165
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TIME-KEEPING IN LONDON.
CLOCK—DENT 1914.
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EDMUND A. ENGLER
IT is proposed in this paper to describe some special features of the instruments by which time is kept at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, the means for correcting them, and the methods and instruments by which time-signals are distributed from the observatory to London and elsewhere.
PopularScience_18821201_0022_002_0003.xml
article
165
165,166,167,168,169,170,171,172
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THE RELATIONS OF THE NATURAL SCIENCES.
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T. STERRY HUNT
THE occasion which brings us together is one which should mark a new departure in the intellectual history of Canada. Science and letters find but few votaries in a country like this, where the best energies of its thinkers are necessarily directed to devising means of subduing the wilderness, opening the ways of communication, improving agriculture, building up industries, and establishing upon a proper basis schools in which the youth of the country may be instructed in those arts and professions which are among the first needs of civilized society.
PopularScience_18821201_0022_002_0004.xml
article
172
172,173,174
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BRAIN-WEIGHT AND BRAIN-POWER.
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J. P. H. BOILEAU
ALTHOUGH the connection between the relative weight of man’s brain and his intellectual development is very well known, and several illustrations of this connection have been published, I feel assured that the following notes of a remarkable case may not only well be added to the list of those already recorded, but that it is desirable that this should be done.
PopularScience_18821201_0022_002_0005.xml
article
174
174,175,176,177,178,179,180,181,182,183,184,185,186,187,188
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THE CELL-STATE.
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PROFESSOR FERDINAND COHN
NOTHING is more sure than that all life is subject to age and death, and yet nothing is more contradictory to our feelings. In the vigor of youth our body feels as if it was created to last for ever; why must the highest work of art wear out and break down with time?
PopularScience_18821201_0022_002_0006.xml
article
188
188,189,190,191,192,193,194,195
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AMERICAN AND FOREIGN ASPHALTS.
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E. J. HALLOCK
BITUMINOUS substances, apparently of organic origin, are found in various parts of the world. Sometimes they occur in a free state, as in the Island of Trinidad, and at others impregnating calcareous rocks, or serving as a cement to hold the particles together, as at Val de Travers or Seyssel.
PopularScience_18821201_0022_002_0007.xml
article
195
195,196,197,198,199,200,201,202,203,204
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SPECULATIVE ZOÖLOGY.
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PROFESSOR W. K. BROOKS
AT a time when most naturalists who venture at all beyond the facts of life-science are busied with the attempt to trace the relationship between the various groups of living things, and to express this relationship in a tree-like system of classification, it is startling to hear from one of the highest authorities on life-science the statement that “the time for genealogical trees is past....
PopularScience_18821201_0022_002_0008.xml
article
204
204,205,206
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ANNUAL GROWTH OF TREES.
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A. L. CIIILD
ARE the concentric rings of a tree a reliable record of its age in years? Such has been the conception—in fact, the undisputed knowledge—of the world, for all time past. I have no recollection of ever having seen or heard the authority of this record disputed till Désiré Charnay, in his “Ruins of Central America,” said, when speaking of the age of the ruins as proved by such a record:
PopularScience_18821201_0022_002_0009.xml
article
206
206,207,208,209,210,211,212,213,214,215,216,217,218,219,220,221,222,223,224,225
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SCIENCE IN RELATION TO THE ARTS.
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C. WILLIAM SIEMENS
GAS is an institution of the utmost value to the artisan; it requires hardly any attention, is supplied upon regulated terms, and gives with what should be a cheerful light a genial warmth, which often saves the lighting of a fire. The time is, moreover, not far distant, I venture to think, when both rich and poor will largely resort to gas as the most convenient, the cleanest, and the cheapest of heating agents, and when raw coal will be seen only at the colliery or the gas-works.
PopularScience_18821201_0022_002_0010.xml
article
225
225,226,227,228,229,230,231
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MUSICAL SENSATIONS.
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M. HÉRICOURT
IT is common, in defining music, to compare it with some other art, painting, for instance, and say it is to the ear what that is to the eye; that it is the representation of the ideal by a means especially adapted to the organ to which it is addressed, or by the combination of sounds.
PopularScience_18821201_0022_002_0011.xml
article
231
231,232,233,234,235,236,237,238,239,240
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IS FINGAL’S CAYE ARTIFICIAL?*
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F. COPE WHITEHOUSE
IN venturing to ask a question and thus imply a doubt upon a point on which geologists, statesmen, and poets have given their consentient opinion for a century, it is not without regret that an opinion, held without suspicion of challenge, should be subjected to criticism, and better proof than prescription required for the title by which this celebrated cavern has been held and enjoyed as the work of Nature.
PopularScience_18821201_0022_002_0012.xml
article
240
240,241,242,243,244
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THE SPECTROSCOPE AND THE WEATHER.
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C. PIAZZI SMYTH
WHAT may be done with the spectroscope in the matter of weather is, for the present at least, confined almost entirely to the question of rain—as, Will it rain, or will it not; and, if it will, heavily or lightly? The manner in which the spectroscope accomplishes this useful part is by its capacity for showing whether there is more or less than the usual quantity of watery vapor permeating the otherwise dry gases in the upper parts of the atmosphere, this watery vapor not being by any means the visible clouds themselves, but the invisible water-gas out of which they have to be formed, and by means of which, when over-abundant, they obtain their privilege for enacting rain-fall.
PopularScience_18821201_0022_002_0013.xml
article
244
244,245,246,247,248,249,250,251,252,253,254,255
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CRIMINALITY IN ANIMALS.
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A. LACASSAGNE
IT is a recognized fact that the anatomy and physiology of animals have afforded valuable help in the study of the human constitution. We might, indeed, say that physiology, toxicology, and therapeutics are based upon experiments which have been made on animals.
PopularScience_18821201_0022_002_0014.xml
article
256
256,257,258,259,260,261,262
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SKETCH OF MATTHIAS JACOB SCHLEIDEN.
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"TWO names,” says M. Leo Herrera, in the “Revue Scientifique,” “are inseparably connected with that grand movement of the biological sciences that began about 1838, and of which we to-day contemplate the superb bloom—Schleiden and Schwann.
PopularScience_18821201_0022_002_0015.xml
article
263
263,264,265,266,267
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ENTERTAINING VARIETIES.
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—Hindoo Ascetics.—Hindostan is the native land of religious fanaticism. Burke ascribes it to the impressive grandeur of Nature (Himalayas, great rivers, East Indian tornadoes, etc.); Jacquemont, to subjective peculiarities of the East Aryan races; but the fact itself admits of no dispute: the Hindoos, as a nation, have always shown a remarkable tendency to sacrifice reason to faith, earth to heaven, and the welfare of the body to the fancied interests of the soul.
PopularScience_18821201_0022_002_0016.xml
article
268
268,269,270,271,272,273,274,275,276
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
SPENCER'S IMPRESSIONS OF AMERICA.
PRINCIPLE IN SMALL THINGS.
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THERE was a strong and perhaps a quite laudable curiosity on the part of many pople to know what impression had been made upon the mind of Herbert Spencer when first coming to this country. It was certainly something more than an idle curiosity on the part of a large number of our citizens to learn his impressions, because it was widely kown that he is a philosophical student of national institutions, and probably the highest living authority on the science of human society.
PopularScience_18821201_0022_002_0017.xml
article
276
276,277,278,279,280,281,282,283
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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GEORGE RIPLEY. By OCTAVIUS BROOKS FROTHINGHAM. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin & Co. Pp. 321. Price, $1.50. MR. FROTHINGHAM’S life of Ripley is a very pleasant and entertaining, if not in the highest degree instructive, book upon its subject.
PopularScience_18821201_0022_002_0018.xml
article
283
283,284,285,286,287,288
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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The Flora of North America.—Professor Asa Gray gave an historical account, at the last meeting of the American Association, of the study and compilation of the North American flora. The first “Flora” of the country was published by Michaux, in 1803.
PopularScience_18821201_0022_002_0019.xml
article
288
288
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NOTES.
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ACCORDING to the Census Bureau’s bulletin of the statistics of the lumbering industry of the United States for the year ending with May last, $181,186,122 are invested in 25,708 establishments for the preparation of lumber, and the total value of the products for the year was $233,367,729.
PopularScience_18821201_0022_002_0020.xml