Issue: 18821101

Wednesday, November 1, 1882
NOVEMBER, 1882, TO APRIL, 1883
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Saturday, November 29, 2014

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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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SEWER-GAS.
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FRANK HASTINGS HAMILTON
ON the 2d of February last Mr. Charles F. Wingate, sanitary engineer, read before the New York Academy of Medicine a paper entitled "Practical Points in Plumbing," etc. Before introducing Mr. Wingate, the president, Dr. Fordyce Barker, read a brief paper, relating his personal experience as to the dangerous nature of sewer-gas, and asking for the earnest attention of the Academy to this subject.
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THE SCIENCE OF THE PRESENT PERIOD.
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EMIL DU BOIS-REYMOND.
WHILE the memorial days of Frederick the Great and of Leibnitz turn the view of the Academy back to the times of its origin and of its new birth, this festival directs its vision upon the present. Whoever, having a nature like that of an academician of the old school, prefers to live a contemplative life far from the tumult of the market and the strife of the forum, or even from the stimulating competition of the lecture-room, intent only on the accumulation of the treasures of knowledge, the solution of intellectual problems, the enlargement of his inner circle of thought, he might well at this period long for the undisturbed rest and the quieting gloom of a middle-age Benedictine cell.
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SOME CURIOUS VEGETABLE GROWTHS.
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W. H. LARRABEE.
THE importance of trees to the earth and to life does not need to be insisted upon. The condition of treeless regions is almost a demonstration that without them the soil would not be tillable and life would not be endurable. It is, therefore, natural that they should have at all times shared the special regards of men; and that not only particular species, but individual trees, should in their times and places have been hallowed with a sacred, historical, legendary, romantic, or mythical interest.
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THE LAW OF HUMAN INCREASE.
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NATHAN ALLEN
IT is almost one hundred years since the attention of T. R. Malthus was first called to the subject of population and its changes. As his views have had more influence than any other writer, it is well to notice briefly what they were. His leading principle is, that "population, when unchecked, increases in a geometrical ratio, while subsistence increases only in an arithmetical ratio."
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SCIENCE IN RELATION TO THE ARTS.
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C. WILLIAM SIEMENS
IN venturing to address the British Association from this chair, I feel that I have taken upon myself a task involving very serious responsibility. The Association has for half a century fulfilled the important mission of drawing together, once every year, scientists from all parts of the country for the purpose of discussing questions of mutual interest, and of cultivating those personal relations which aid so powerfully in harmonizing views, and in stimulating concerted action for the advancement of science.
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PHYSIOGNOMIC CURIOSITIES.
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FELIX L. OSWALD
BUT, besides these local ideals (referred to in the preceding number), there is an international standard of beauty which has survived the mutations in other canons of taste. Athenæus mentions the ingredients of a once-famous sea-fish sauce, and the attempt to try his receipt nearly suffocated the courtiers of Queen Christina with nausea and laughter.
PopularScience_18821101_0022_001_0007.xml
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THE BRITISH LION.
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W. BOYD DAWKINS
THE British Lion to be dealt with in the following pages is not that of the heralds, nor is it the amiable, shy, rather tame animal just now crouching down behind “the silver streak,” pretending to fear lest the foreigner should get at him unawares through a tunnel, nor yet is it the ephemeral much-to-be-pitied creature of the drawing-room.
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SCIENTIFIC FARMING AT ROTHAMSTED.
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MANLY MILES
IN the literature of every department of agriculture, the references to the Rothamsted experiments are getting to be as familiar as household words, and it is now generally admitted that they have had an important influence on English farm-practice.
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WHO WAS PRIMITIVE MAN?
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PROFESSOR GRANT ALLEN
WHEN Sir Charles Lyell's "Antiquity of Man" and Mr. Darwin's two great works first set all the world thinking about the origin of our race, there was a general tendency among scientific men and the public generally to take it for granted that the earliest known men, those whose remains we find in the river-drift, were necessarily "missing links" between the human species and its supposed anthropoid progenitors.
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LIFE AMONG THE BATTAS OF SUMATRA.
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DR. A. SCHREIBER.
ALTHOUGH the Battas have a writing and a very limited literature, it has never occurred to any one among them to compile and preserve their historical traditions. Consequently their history, as we know it, reaches back for only a short distance in time, and gives no clew by the aid of which we can learn when and whence they came to Sumatra.
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SKETCH OF CHARLES ADOLPHE WURTZ.
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CHARLES ADOLPHE WURTZ, President of the French Academy of Sciences, is one of the recognized leaders of modern chemistry. Much of his work is regarded as of the first importance in connection with chemical theory, and he is justly considered one of the chief pioneers of modern organic chemistry.
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CORRESPONDENCE.
THEORY OF THE SUN’S LIGHT AND HEAT.
ORIGIN OF STORMS.
CENTRAL AMERICAN GEOGRAPHICAL NAMES.
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IN the June number of “The Popular Science Monthly,” a new theory of the origin of the light and heat of the sun is attributed to Dr. H. R. Rogers, of Dunkirk, New York. An able and succinct statement of the theory was given by Dr. Rogers, in a paper read before the American Association for the Advancement of Science, in Cincinnati, August, 1881.
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
MALLOCK AND HIS NEW SCIENCE.
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MR. WILLIAM HURRELL MALLOCK, having settled to his own eminent satisfaction the little preliminary question, "Is Life worth Living?" has now taken another step in his intellectual career. And this new step is, if possible, more ambitious than the preceding, for he informs us that he is the discoverer of a new science.
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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IDEOLOGICAL ETYMOLOGY; OR, A NEW METHOD IN THE STUDY OF WORDS. By STEPHEN PEARL ANDREWS. ELEMENTS OF UNIVERSOLOGY: An Introduction to the Study of Philosophy and the Sciences. With Special Reference to the Science of Music. By STEPHEN PEARL ANDREWS.
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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The Glacial Moraine in Pennsylvania.— Professor H. C. Lewis read a paper before the American Association concerning the results of his efforts to trace the great terminal moraine marking the southern limit of the North American ice-sheet across Pennsylvania.
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NOTES.
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MR. LEONARD WALDO, of the Thermometric Bureau of the Observatory of Yale College, reports that more than twice as many thermometers were examined in 1881 —’82 as in 1880—'81, and that 4,552 certificates were issued during the year covered by the last report.
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