Issue: 18801101

Monday, November 1, 1880
NOVEMBER, 1880, TO APRIL, 1881
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Saturday, November 29, 2014

Articles
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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THE DEVELOPMENT OF POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS.
I.—PRELIMINARY.
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HERBERT SPENCER
THOUGHT and feeling can not be completely dissociated. Each emotion has a more or less distinct framework of ideas ; and each group of ideas is more or less suffused with emotion. There are, however, great differences between their degrees of combination under both of these aspects.
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11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,2
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THE SUN'S HEAT.
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PROFESSOR C. A. YOUNG
THERE has been a prevailing idea for many years, founded upon Brewster’s fallacious experiments, that thermal, luminous, and chemical rays are fundamentally different, though coexistent in the sunbeams. This is erroneous : it is true, indeed, that rays whose vibrations are too slow to be seen produce powerful heating effects, and that those which are invisible because they are too rapid have a strong influence in determining certain chemical and physical reactions ; but it is also true that the visible rays are capable of producing the same effects to a greater or less degree, and there is some reason for thinking that certain animals can see by rays to which the human retina is insensible.
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26,27,28,29,30,31
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EDUCATION AS A HINDRANCE TO MANUAL OCCUPATIONS.
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PROFESSOR SILVANUS P. THOMPSON
THERE can not be two opinions as to the prejudicial influence exerted upon the industrial interests of Great Britain by the unsatisfactory state into which the question of apprenticeship has been gradually drifting, and out of which it has not yet begun to rise anew.
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THE GLACIAL MAN IN AMERICA.
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B. F. DE COSTA
IN that distant age when Nature was still toiling at the foundations of the Eastern Continent, portions of America had become dry land, and mountain-peaks in North Carolina were illuminated by rising and setting suns. It is, therefore, an anachronism to speak of America as the New World, especially when we remember the high antiquity of the fauna of North America.
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A FLOCK OF MYTHOLOGICAL CROWS.
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W. H. GARDNER
PERHAPS there are but few persons who have read Poe’s "Raven," or Dickens’s "Barnaby Rudge," who have not felt some curiosity to learn why ravens and crows, more than any other birds, should be invested with characters so ominous and demoniacal.
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THE ELECTRIC BURGLAR-ALARM.
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ELABORATE as are the ordinary agencies for the protection of property, they afford but a partial security. Well-lighted streets, careful watchmen, numerous policemen, and strong and ingeniously arranged bolts and bars, are certainly obstacles not easily overcome.
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64,65,66,67,68,69,70,71,72,73,74,75,76
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MENTAL IMAGERY.
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FRANCIS GALTON
THERE are great differences in the power of forming pictures of objects in the mind’s eye ; in other words, of visualizing them. In some persons the faculty of perceiving these images is so feeble that they hardly visualize at all, and they supplement their deficiency chiefly by memories of muscular strain, of gesture, and of posture, and partly by memories of touch ; recalling objects in the same way as those who were blind from their birth.
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76,77,78,79,80
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HENRY AND FARADAY.
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PROFESSOR ALFRED M. MAYER
MOST reluctantly do I here desist from citing further the works of Henry. It is impossible to crowd into one brief hour the thoughts which were his occupation during more than half a century. I have at least endeavored to exhibit before you the more important of the labors of his life.
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80,81,82,83,84,85,86,87,88,89,90,91,92,93,94,95,96
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THE EVOLUTION OF ORGANIC FORM.
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CHARLES MORRIS
WHAT does the story of life upon the earth teach us concerning the unfoldment of organic form? Is the human figure a chance result of an evolutionary force which might have pursued some quite different direction ; or are the laws of development such as to lead inevitably toward the form of man as their highest organic product?
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96,97,98,99,100,101
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THE PROFUSION OF LIFE.
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ARABELLA B. BUCKLEY
I WONDER whether it ever occurs to most people to consider how brimful our world is of life, and what a different place it would be if no living thing had ever been upon it? From the time we are born till we die, there is scarcely a waking moment of our lives in which our eyes do not rest either upon some living thing or upon things which have once been alive.
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101,102,103,104,105,106,107
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CRITICISMS CORRECTED.
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HERBERT SPENCER
AN objection made to the formula of evolution by a sympathetic critic, Mr. T. E. Cliffe Leslie, calls for notice. It is urged in a spirit widely different from that displayed by Mr. Kirkman and his applauder, Professor Tait ; and it has an apparent justification.
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108,109,110,111,112,113
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HYPNOTISM.
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G. J. ROMANES
CONSIDERING the length of time that so-called "animal magnetism." "mesmerism," or "electro-biology," has been before the world, it is a matter of surprise that so inviting a field of physiological inquiry should have been so long allowed to lie fallow.
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SKETCH OF LEWIS H. MORGAN,
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J. W. POWELL
LEWIS HENRY MORGAN was born near the village of Aurora, New York, November 21, 1818. The subject of this sketch is eight generations in lineal descent on his father's side from James Morgan, who settled in Roxbury, Massachusetts, in 1646; and on his mother's side from John Steele, who settled in Newton, now Cambridge, in 1641; beginning with these, seven generations of his ancestors have lived and died in New England.
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122,123,124,125
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CORRESPONDENCE.
SCIENCE AT PRINCETON COLLEGE.
THE SENSE OF DIRECTION IN ANIMALS.
SCIENCE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN.
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THERE are statements in the "Correspondence" of the last number of "The Popular Science Monthly" fitted to leave an unjust impression as to what is taught in Princeton College. I do not enter upon the argument of that article, which is palpably illogical.
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125,126,127,128,129
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
POLITICAL SCIENCE.
SCIENCE IN THE COLLEGES.
THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE FAIR.
POWDER AND BALL FOR DEMAGOGUES.
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WE commence this month the publication of an important series of articles on "The Development of Political Institutions" from the highest living authority on the subject of the science of society. By the science of society is meant such a systematic exposition of the facts and relations of social phenomena as shall bring out the natural laws of social change and transformation.
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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Two WORLDS ARE OURS. By Rev. HUGH MACMILLAN, LL.D., F. R. S. E. New York: Macmillan & Co. Pp. 349. Price,$1.75. To say that this book is by the author of “Bible Teachings in Nature ” and “First Forms of Vegetation,” published several years ago, will be a strong commendation to many readers.
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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Improved Safety Construction of Elevators.—With an appliance in such general use as the elevator, means of securing safety in case of the parting of the cable, or failure of other parts of the moving apparatus, are of prime importance. A great variety of devices, many of them quite ingenious, have been designed to accomplish this object, but few of them are entirely satisfactory.
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NOTES.
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DURING an excursion to the White Mountains made in July, 1879, Mr. W. H. Pickering visited a moving mass of snow in Tuckerman ravine, which he describes as presenting many of the phenomena of an Alpine glacier, only on a greatly reduced scale. The surface of the snow was convex, being highest at the middle ; where not exposed to the sun it was very hard, and differed from ice only in color.
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