Issue: 18791201

Monday, December 1, 1879
DECEMBER, 1879
2
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16
Saturday, October 18, 2014

Articles
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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RECENT ANTHROPOLOGY.*
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EDWARD B. TYLOR
D. C. L.
E. R. S.
IN surveying modern scientific opinion, the student is often reminded of a doctrine proclaimed in the ancient hymns of the ZendAvesta, that of Zrvâna akarana, or "endless time." Our modern schemes of astronomy, geology, biology, are all framed on the assumption of past time immense in length.
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157,158,159,160,161,162,163,164,165,166,167
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ON RADIANT MATTER.*
Radiant Matter exerts Strong Mechanical Action where it strikes.
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WILLIAM CROOKES
WE have seen, from the sharpness of the molecular shadows, that radiant matter is arrested by solid matter placed in its path. If this solid body is easily moved, the impact of the molecules will reveal itself in strong mechanical action. Mr. Gimingham has constructed for me an ingenious piece of apparatus which, when placed in the electric lantern, will render this mechanical action visible to all present.
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THE GENESIS OF SEX.*
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PROFESSOR JOSEPH LE CONTE
THE subject on which I address you to-day is one which is still veiled in much obscurity—so much so, indeed, that it is barely alluded to by evolutionists, is not touched upon by physiologists, and is regarded by the popular mind, even the intelligent popular mind, as wholly beyond the possible ken of human science.
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OCEAN METEOROLOGY.
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LIEUTENANT T. A. LYONS
THE frequent examination of Maury's charts for the purpose of shortening tedious passages under sail, led to the idea of remodeling them for greater ease of consultation, and at the same time of adding the vast store of data accumulated since their publication.
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197,198,199,200
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FIRST-HAND AND SECOND-HAND KNOWLEDGE.*
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W. B. DALBY
IN every system of education in which natural science forms no part, whatever knowledge the pupil gains is acquired from what he reads or from what he is told, and the truth of facts so presented to him he must take either upon trust or, in so far as they can be demonstrated to his reason, by logic or mathematics.
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EDUCATION OF BRAIN-CELLS.
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J. MORTIMER GRANVILLE
THE very interesting and important case recently narrated by Professor Sharpey in this periodical* recalls one that fell under my own observation rather more than twenty years ago. I will state its principal features, without going into details, and then venture to make the two cases an occasion for a few brief speculations which I am desirous of laying before medical-psychologists, with a view to obvious practical inferences in respect to the treatment of what I conceive to be a not uncommon cerebral condition.
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204,205,206,207,208,209,210
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EARLY METHODS IN ARITHMETIC.
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E. O. VAILE
IN our day arithmetic is looked upon as a science of which every boy at fourteen ought to be master. Such was not the case a century or so back. In England, as well as upon the Continent, arithmetic was long considered a higher branch of science, and a university study, like geometry.
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210,211,212,213,214,215,216,217,218,219
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SPENCER'S DATA OF ETHICS.
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ALEXANDER BAIN
IN the immense abundance of literary production a great deal of criticism is avowedly calculated to supersede the perusal of the works themselves. Such a book as the present, however, is among the rarest; and being on the most interesting of all themes, and withal lucid and short, the critic would be much mistaken in assuming that it will not be read by his own readers and many besides.
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HISTORY AND METHODS OF PALEONTOLOGICAL DISCOVERY.*
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PROFESSOR O. C. MARSH
IN the rapid progress of knowledge, we are constantly brought face to face with the question, What is life? The answer is not yet, but a thousand earnest seekers after truth seem to be slowly approaching a solution. This question gives a new interest to every department of science that relates to life in any form, and the history of life offers a most suggestive field for research.
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THE BEGINNINGS OF GEOGRAPHICAL SCIENCE.
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GEORGE A. JACKSON
NO other science has to-day so distinguished a patronage as that of geography. In September, 1877, there convened at Brussels, in a palace of the King of the Belgians, and at his invitation, a Congress made up of the presidents of the leading geographical societies, and the most distinguished geographical writers, and explorers, and patrons of explorations, in the world.
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EXPECTED METEORIC DISPLAY.
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RICHARD A. PROCTOR
IT is expected, by nearly all astronomers who have given attention to the subject, that there will be a display of falling stars on or about November 27th next, though the night of the shower may perhaps fall earlier or later, within a week or so either way.
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MANY—TOED HORSES.
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WHEN Professor Huxley gave his lectures in New York, three years ago, on the evidences of evolution, he brought forward the genealogy of the horse as made out by recent fossil discoveries, and claimed that it was decisive in establishing the principle of descent, derivation, and development through the geological periods.
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SKETCH OF HEINRICH WILHELM DOVE.
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FREDERICK HOFFMANN
THE veteran savants who inaugurated the great advances in modern physical research are passing away, one after another, leaving their achievements for completion to the succeeding generation, and their imperishable fame to the records of human history.
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CORRESPONDENCE.
CURIOUS EFFECT OF LIGHTNING.
WHY DO WELLS AND SPRINGS OVERFLOW?
ON ATLANTIS.
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THE following remarkable freak of lightning seems to me worthy of record: There was a severe shower, accompanied by vivid lightning and peals of thunder, in Salem, Massachusetts, August 6, 1879. A lady, while passing through a room in range of two open windows, was suddenly enveloped in a blaze of light from her feet to her waist.
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267,268,269,270,271,272,273,274,275,276,277
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EDITOR'S TABLE.
GOLDWIN SMITH ON MORALS.
MORALITY AMONG THE CHINESE.
ROOD'S CHROMATICS—A MISLEADING CRITICISM.
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PROFESSOR GOLDWIN SMITH is a student of history, and in the November "Atlantic Monthly" he has given us the fruits of his historical studies in relation to morality. He contributes an article on "The Prospect of a Moral Interregnum," which, being interpreted, means a moral break-down.
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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GRAY'S BOTANICAL TEXT-BOOK. Sixth Edition. Part I. Structural Botany, or Organography on the Basis of Morphology. To which are added the Principles of Taxonomy and Phytography, and a Glossary of Botanical Terms. By ASA GRAY, LL. D., etc., Fisher Professor of Natural History (Botany) in Harvard University.
PopularScience_18791201_0016_002_0017.xml
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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Physiology of the Turkish Bath.—Most accounts of the Turkish bath have been confined to general descriptions of the details of the process, and of the sensations experienced during its use; while comparatively little attention has until lately been paid to the more important consideration of its influence on the bodily functions.
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NOTES.
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ACCORDING to Professor Lintner, President of the Entomological Club, the study of entomology is making very gratifying progress in this country; collections are multiplying, and the literature of the subject is growing rapidly. The Club has compiled a list of persons engaged in the study of entomology in the United States; it already contains eight hundred and thirty-five names.
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