Issue: 18791001

Wednesday, October 1, 1879
OCTOBER, 1879
6
True
15
Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Articles
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721
721
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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720
720,721,722,723,724,725,726,727,728,729,730,731,732,733,734,735,736,737,738,739,740,741,742,743,744,745,746,747,748,749
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PROTOPLASM AND LIFE. *
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PBOFESSOR G. J. ALLMAN
MORE than forty years have now passed away since the French naturalist, Dujardin, drew attention to the fact that the bodies of some of the lowest members of the animal kingdom consist of a structureless, semi-fluid, contractile substance, to which he gave the name of Sarcode.
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750
750,751,752,753,754,755,756,757,758,759
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JOHN STUART MILL.
III.
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ALEXANDEK BAIN
MY acquaintance with Mill dates from 1839, when I was a student at Marischal College, Aberdeen. In the winter of 1838-'39, John Robertson, who was then assisting in the Review, paid a short visit to his native city. I had known him when I was a child, but had not seen him for years.
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759
759,760,761,762,763,764
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ATLANTIS NOT A MYTH.
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EDWARD H. THOMPSON
OUR sturdy worker in the copper mines of Lake Superior, finding both himself and his vein of copper growing poorer day by day, determines to seek some more paying claim in the as yet unexplored portion of the copper country. He gathers his kit of tools together and starts, and, after many a hard hour's travel over the wild and rugged country, finds a region with abundant signs of copper, and where seemingly no human foot has trod since creation's dawn.
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article
764
764,765,766,767,768,769,770,771,772
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MICRO-ORGANISMS AND THEIR EFFECTS IN NATURE.
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WILLIAM S. BAENABD
WHAT is too small to be seen, people are generally apt to regard with contempt or indifference, as of no practical consequence. This is one of the grossest of popular errors. There is not only a profound scientific interest in the realm of microscopic life, which is every day becoming deeper as its organisms are viewed from the standpoint of evolution, but they have a significance in the economy of nature, a usefulness to man, and a value in the industrial arts, of which but few glimpses have as yet been popularly obtained.
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article
772
772,773,774,775,776,777,778,779,780,781,782,783,784,785,786,787,788,789,790,791,792,793,794,795
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THE SCIENCE AND PHILOSOPHY OF EECEEATION.*
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GEORGE J. ROMANES
IN all places of the civilized world, and in all classes of the civilized community, the struggle for existence is now more keen than ever it has been during the history of our race. Everywhere men, and women, and children are living at a pressure positively frightful to contemplate.
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795,796,797,798,799,800,801,802,803,804,805,806,807,808
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MYTHOLOGIC PHILOSOPHY.*
I.—THE GENESIS OF PHILOSOPHY.
II.—Two GRAND STAGES OF PHILOSOPHY.
III.—MYTHOLOGIC PHILOSOPHY HAS FOUR STAGES.
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MAJOR J. W. POWELL
THE wonders of the course of nature have ever challenged attention. In savagery, in barbarism, and in civilization alike, the mind of man has sought the explanation of things. The movements of the heavenly bodies, the change of seasons, the succession of night and day, the powers of the air, majestic mountains, ever-flowing rivers, perennial springs, the flight of birds, the gliding of serpents, the growth of trees, the blooming of flowers, the forms of stormcarved rocks, the mysteries of life and death, the institutions of society —many are the things to be explained.
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article
808
808,809,810,811,812
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A HOME-MADE SPECTROSCOPE.
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JAMES J. FUENISS
THE person to whom the study of spectroscopy is really attractive and congenial will not rest satisfied with mere reading, but, sooner or later, will experience a desire to possess a spectroscope of his own—to see for himself the phenomena which are described in the books.
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812
812,813,814,815,816,817,818,819,820,821,822,823,824,825
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THE SOURCE OF MUSCULAR POWER.
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II. P. ARMSBY
THE question of the source of muscular power is essentially a question concerning transformation of energy. The most characteristic distinction between plants and animals is, that the former appropriate force from outside themselves, from sunlight, and store it up as potential energy in the various complex compounds which they form in ; while animals draw their supplies of force entirely from those compounds in which it has been stored up by plants, and from which it is set free again when they are decomposed in the organism.
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825
825,826,827,828,829,830,831,832
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THE RESULTS OF ABSTRACTION IN SCIENCE.
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CHARLES T. HAVILAND
THE old scholastic controversy as to the reality of universals has its analogue in modern times. Formerly the strife had its religious implications, and it was from the arsenal of theology that the defenders of realism procured their weapons.
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833
833,834,835,836,837
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THE AGE OF ICE.*
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II. B. NORTON
ANCIENT moraines, striations denoting the action of vanished glaciers, the lost rocks, clay-beds evidently of glacial origin— all these are evidences testifying that at some period not very remote, as we count geological periods, the whole northern hemisphere down to the southern limit of 40° was submerged and covered with vast glaciers and ice-floes.
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838
838,839,840
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SKETCH OF PROFESSOR FRANKLAND.
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AMONG the eminent men of England whose names are closely associated with the contemporary progress of chemical science that of Dr. Frankland has a distinguished place. Having a genius for the theoretical and speculative side of his favorite subject, together with a thorough and comprehensive discipline in experimental operations, he has devoted himself with equal zeal and success to pure chemistry, to its physical relations, and to its large applications to public and sanitary questions which depend for their elucidation upon chemical knowledge. Eminent also as a teacher and an organizer of research, and occupying many positions of responsibility, he has exerted a powerful influence in drawing students to this branch of study, and in awakening their enthusiasm in its pursuit.
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841
841,842
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CORRESPONDENCE.
SERPENT-CHARM.
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IT would seem that, in his paper on "Serpent-Charm" in the September number of the "Monthly," Dr. Oswald over-looks a factor which is of too great importance to be wholly disregarded. That this is the case may be shown by an incident coming under my own observation, and two or three references.
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842
842,843,844,845
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EDITOR'S TABLE.
THE SCIENTIFIC ASSOCIATIONS.
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THE scientists had a profitable and pleasant time at Saratoga. The twenty-eighth annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, which met there this year, was well attended and successful i n every respect. A larger number than usual of the old and eminent members of the body were present, and that the gathering represented a goodly proportion of the scientific working power of the country is shown by the fact that about one hundred and fifty papers were contributed, in different fields of inquiry, many of which were of marked merit.
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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A SKETCH OF DICKINSON COLLEGE, PENNSYLVANIA : Including the List of Trustees and Faculty from the Foundation, and a more Particular Account of the Scientific Department. By CHARLES F. HIMES, Ph. D., Professor of Natural Science. Illustrated by Engravings and by Photographs executed in the Laboratory.
PopularScience_18791001_0015_006_0015.xml
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853
853,854,855,856,857,858,859,860,861,862,863
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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The Saratoga Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. —The Saratoga meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science was very numerously attended by members from all parts of the United States. The presence of very many of the foremost scientists of the country was a reassuring evidence of the high esteem in which the work of the Association is held by those whose pursuits and attainments best qualify them to judge of its value.
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863
863,864
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NOTES.
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NEXT year the American Association for the Advancement of Science will hold its meetings in Boston, commencing on the last Wednesday of August. The officers are: President, L. H. Morgan, of Rochester; Vice-President, Section A, Asaph Hall, of Washington; Vice-President, Section B, Alexander Agassiz, of Cambridge, Massachusetts; Permanent Secretary, F. W. Putnam, of Cambridge, Massachusetts; General Secretary, John K. Rees, of St. Louis; Secretary of Section A, Henry B. Nason, of Troy, New York; Secretary of Section B, C. V. Riley, of St. Louis; Treasurer, William S. Vaux, of Philadelphia.
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865
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INDEX.
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PAGE ABSTRACTION in Science, The Results of............................... 825 Aconite, its Physiological Action..................................... 281 Adulteration of Food and Drugs....... ............................. 286
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