Issue: 18781001

Tuesday, October 1, 1878
OCTOBER, 1878
6
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13
Friday, October 31, 2014

Articles
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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641
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THE GEOLOGICAL HISTORY OF NEW YORK ISLAND AND HARBOR.
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J. S. NEWBERRY
I. NEW YORK IN ANCIENT GEOLOGICAL TIMES.—The rocks which compose New York Island and underlie the adjacent country on the north and east are chiefly gneiss and mica-schist, with heavy intercalated beds of coarse-grained, dolomitic marble and thinner layers of serpentine.
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article
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EDUCATION AS A SCIENCE.
V.—THE EMOTIONS IN EDUCATION.
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ALEXANDER BAIN
THE EMOTION OF POWER.—The state named the feeling or emotion of power expresses a first-class motive of the human mind. It is, however, shown, with great probability, not to be an independent source of emotion. It very often consists of a direct reference to possessions or worldly abundance.
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article
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THE PROGRESS OF ANTHROPOLOGY.1
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PROFESSOR T. H. HUXLEY
WHEN I undertook, with the greatest possible pleasure, to act as a lieutenant of my friend the president of this section, I steadfastly purposed to confine myself to the modest and useful duties of that position. For reasons, with which it is not worth while to trouble you, I did not propose to follow the custom which has grown up in the Association of delivering an address upon the occasion of taking the chair of a section or department.
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article
677
677,678,679,680,681,682,683,684,685,686,687,688,689
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MONERA, AND THE PROBLEM OF LIFE.
III.—THE PHYSICAL PHASE OF THE PROBLEM.—(Concluded.)
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EDMUND MONTGOMERY
IT has been shown in former articles that living motion is the result of alternate expansion and contraction on the part of the protoplasm; and we could not fail to perceive that this occupation of so much more or so much less space is the physical property of the protoplasm under different states of chemical composition.
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article
689
689,690,691,692,693
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ELECTRICITY IN THUNDER-STORMS.1
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ELISHA FOOTE
THE great development of electricity in thunder-storms has been a subject of much speculation. Its explanation, however, is still an unsettled question. Some views on this subject are presented in this paper. We have no evidence that the production of fogs or clouds—the change from invisible to visible vapor, or from combined to uncombined moisture—produces any electricity.
PopularScience_18781001_0013_006_0006.xml
article
694
694,695,696,697,698
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CONSCIOUSNESS UNDER CHLOROFORM.
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HERBERT SPENCER
A UNIVERSITY graduate, whose studies in psychology and philosophy have made him an observer able to see the meanings of his experiences, has furnished me with the following account of the feelings and ideas that arose in him during loss of consciousness and during return to consciousness.
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article
698
698,699,700,701,702,703,704,705,706,707,708,709,710,711,712,713,714
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HALLUCINATIONS OF THE SENSES.
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DR. HENRY MAUDSLEY
BY hallucination is meant, in scientific phraseology, such a false perception of one or other of the senses as a person has when he sees, hears, or otherwise perceives as real what has no outward existence—that is to say, has no existence outside his own mind, is entirely subjective.
PopularScience_18781001_0013_006_0008.xml
article
714
714,715,716,717,718
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YELLOW FEVER.
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ROGER S. TRACY
AN attack of yellow fever is generally quite sudden, though in some cases there are slight premonitory symptoms, such as loss of appetite, general uneasiness, headache, or costiveness. It is commonly ushered in by chilliness, alternating with flushes of heat, or the person may be overcome with languor and extreme debility, while at his usual occupation.
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article
719
719,720,721,722,723,724,725,726,727,728,729,730,731,732
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BIRD OR REPTILE—WHICH?
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HENRY O. FORBES
TO most people it may appear not only easy enough to distinguish, but even a matter of some difficulty not to be able to identify, a bird from a reptile or from any other animal whatsoever. No one would hesitate for a moment to assign to the bird tribe, on seeing them even for the first time, forms differing from each other so much as the “wingless” apteryx of New Zealand and the strong-pinioned albatross; the marvelously tinted humming-bird and the raw-necked vulture; or the fleet ostrich and the stolid hornbill; for in each individual the eye at once perceives one character at least common to the whole assemblage which is wanting in all other groups.
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732
732,733,734,735
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THE PLANET VULCAN.
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PROFESSOR DANIEL KIRKWOOD
THE discovery of an intra-Mercurial planet during the total eclipse of July 29, 1878, has given new importance to any previous speculations on the question of its existence. A brief historical review of the subject will not be without interest.
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article
735
735,736,737,738,739,740,741,742
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THE GENESIS OF DISINTERESTED BENEVOLENCE.
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PAUL FRIEDMANN
DISINTERESTED benevolence, about the genesis of which so much has been written, is a name for two distinguishable things. It is in some cases meant to designate that feeling which prompts us in a special instance to do good to some individual object.
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article
742
742,743,744
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SKETCH OF CLAUDE BERNARD.
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CLAUDE BERNARD died at Paris, in February, 1878, in the sixtyfifth year of his age. The nineteenth century produced Magendie, Flourens, Johannes MÜller, Charles Bell, Marshall Hall, and others, who made great discoveries in human physiology; but none of these great men did more for the advancement of knowledge in this direction than the subject of our sketch.
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article
745
745,746,747,748,749
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
THE SCIENTIFIC ASSOCIATIONS.
THE STUDY OF PROTOPLASM.
YELLOW FEVER, AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT.
COOKERY AND EDUCATION.
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THE American and British Associations for the Advancement of Science have again assembled in their customary annual meetings, the former in St. Louis, and the latter in Dublin. The American meeting was not large, its location being unfavorable to draw people from remote distances in the heat of August.
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article
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749,750,751,752,753,754,755,756,757,758
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LITERARY NOTICES.
INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC SERIES, No. XXIV.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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IN the preparation of this work Prof. Thurston has made an important contribution, alike to the excellent series of works of which it will form a part, and to the historical literature of the arts and sciences. There was a niche for such a book, which ought to have been filled before.
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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Systematic Promotion of Research.— Prof. R. H. Thurston, Vice-President of the American Association, chose as the subject of his address to Section A, "The Science of the Advancement of Science.” Having asked, “Why is the advancement of science to-day so apparently difficult and irregular and toilsome?
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article
767
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NOTES.
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COMPLAINT is made in the newspapers that fish and fowl are dying by millions in different parts of the country, poisoned, it is supposed, by Paris-green. In the valley of the Connecticut Paris-green is freely used to destroy the potato-beetle, and the recent heavy rains have washed it into the rivers, together with untold millions of poisoned beetles.
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advertisement
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Advertisement
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