Issue: 18771001

Monday, October 1, 1877
OCTOBER, 1877
6
True
11
Friday, October 31, 2014

Articles
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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641
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BATHYBIUS AND THE MONERS.1
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PROFESSOR ERNST HAECKEL
"BATHYBIUS, about which so much has been said, has no existence; the assumption of its existing rested on illusions. It will be the same with the rest of the Moneres; these supposed primordial organisms, too, will prove to be the product of erroneous observation.
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653
653,654,655,656,657,658
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MOLECULAR MAGNITUDES.
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L. R. CURTISS
IN entering upon an analysis of the subject of atomic and molecular magnitudes, it is desirable that we should have as clear an idea of the immeasurably small in Nature as possible. To the astronomer the size and relative distances of the celestial bodies are real magnitudes, and so also, to the molecular physicist, the magnitudes verging upon the infinitely small are just as much of a reality.
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article
658
658,659,660,661,662,663,664,665,666,667,668
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SIMPLE EXPERIMENTS IN OPTICS.
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ELIZA A. YOUMANS
THE little work of Mayer and Barnard, designed to introduce beginners to the experimental study of optics, is so much needed, so skillfully done, and may be so helpful to teachers and students of all ages, that it is desirable to offer a few illustrations of the method of experiment adopted, and to point out some of the cheap and simple ways which Prof.
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article
668
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ON ELEMENTARY INSTRUCTION IN PHYSIOLOGY.
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T. H. HUXLEY
THE chief ground upon which I venture to recommend that the teaching of elementary physiology should form an essential part of any organized course of instruction in matters pertaining to domestic economy, is that a knowledge of even the elements of this subject supplies those conceptions of the constitution and mode of action of the living body, and of the nature of health and disease, which prepare the mind to receive instruction from sanitary science.
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672
672,673,674,675,676,677,678,679,680,681,682
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COSMIC AND ORGANIC EVOLUTION.
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LESTER F. WARD
THE evolution of a world is not obviously identical with the evolution of an organism. From one point of view they may be regarded as, to a certain extent, opposite processes. Fully understood, they are different manifestations of one process, affected by very different circumstances.
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article
682
682,683,684,685,686,687,688,689,690
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PESSIMISM AND ITS ANTIDOTE.
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CHARLES NISBET
THE consideration of general questions not admitting of definite answer, and always throwing us back on the consciousness of the extreme limitation of our knowledge, is not a profitable direction of mind, nor to be recommended as an exclusive study.
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article
691
691,692,693,694,695,696,697,698,699,700,701,702,703,704
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THE MODERN PIANO-FORTE.
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S. AUSTEN PEARCE
MUSICAL instruments with manuals or key-boards, and fixed tones, occupy a most important position in the annals of modern art. All the greatest composers have been skilled performers on such instruments, and especially on the piano-forte.
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article
704
704,705
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SNORING, AND HOW TO STOP IT.
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JOHN A. WYETH
TO those unacquainted with the mysterious parlance of the anatomist, the use of strictly scientific terms might prove discouraging and fail to interest. I shall therefore discard the scientific in favor of the every-day phrases, in explanation of the following figure (1), which, it will be observed, represents a human head split from above downward through the central line.
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article
706
706,707,708,709
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MARS AND ITS SATELLITES.
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PROFESSOR DANIEL KIRKWOOD
THE recent and wholly unexpected discovery of two Martial satellites has awakened a new and lively interest in all that relates to our neighboring planet. Its telescopic aspect and the probable nature of its physical constitution are especially worthy of renewed consideration.
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article
709
709,710,711,712,713
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HUXLEY’S AMERICAN LECTURES.
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PROFESSOR E. RAY LANKESTER
THE five addresses which have been recently brought out by Prof. Huxley in the form of a small volume were delivered under very varied conditions, and deal with subjects widely separate from one another. Three of them form a series of lectures on the doctrine of Evolution, and were delivered by the author at New York in September, last year.
PopularScience_18771001_0011_006_0011.xml
article
713
713,714,715,716,717,718,719,720,721
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SPECIMENS OF EDUCATIONAL LITERATURE.
“THE TWO CUMBERLANDS,
“HEALTH AND WEALTH
“No PARALLEL
“THE SCENERY
“THE COMMUNITY.
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F. W. CLARKE
AMERICA is unquestionably preëminent in educational matters. It has more schools and a greater variety of schools than any other country on the face of the earth. Some of these schools are extremely remarkable. You cannot match them elsewhere.
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article
721
721,722,723,724,725,726,727,728,729,730,731,732,733,734
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THE PSYCHO-PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES.
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JOSEPH RODES BUCHANAN
THERE has ever been, and probably for another century there will continue to be, an "irrepressible conflict" between those whose conceptions of Nature are limited by sensation—who recognize no existence but matter and motion, who trace all that exists to material causes alone—and a very different class of thinkers, who trace causation beyond matter, who discover causes that are not material (called spiritual), who believe that the Great First Cause (the Unknowable of materialists) is an infinite spiritual power or basis of all things, and who recognize in man also a spiritual power of which they are conscious, widely different from matter, partaking of the nature of the Divine, and, being a very positive entity—the greatest of all realities to us—destined, in accordance with the doctrine of the persistence of force, to a duration analogous to that of matter.
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article
734
734,735,736,737,738,739,740,741,742,743,744,745
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THE DECLINE OF PARTY GOVERNMENT.
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PROFESSOR GOLDWIN SMITH
THE late presidential election appears likely, in its results, to mark an epoch not only in the political history of the United States, but in that of all constitutional countries. In the person of the new President the American Government has come out of party and is trving to be the government of the whole nation.
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745,746,747
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SKETCH OF PROFESSOR JEVONS.
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WILLIAM STANLEY JEVONS was born at Liverpool, in the year 1835. His father, Thomas Jevons, was an iron-merchant in that city; his mother was a daughter of William Roscoe, the wellknown historian. She was a woman of great cultivation, the writer of hymns and poems which are to be found in general collections, and the editor of the "Sacred Offering.”
PopularScience_18771001_0011_006_0015.xml
article
748
748,749,750
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CORRESPONDENCE.
"THE TIDES."
THE NEW IDEAS ABOUT SPACE.
THE WOODRUFF SCIENTIFIC EXPEDITION.
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I HAVE read with a good deal of interest Prof. Schneider’s article on “The Tides,” in the July number of the MONTHLY. I was pleased with his method of approaching the problem, because it deals with the planetary bodies as we actually see them in motion, not demanding that effort of the imagination required in studying the problem simply as one of static equilibrium.
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article
750
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
CARPENTER ON SPIRITUALISM.
INDICATIONS OF PROGRESS.
THE DECLINE OF PARTIES.
FURTHER ASTRONOMICAL DISCOVERIES.
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THE recent publication of Dr. Carpenter’s little volume entitled “Mesmerism, Spiritualism, etc., Historically and Scientifically Considered,” has given a renewed impulse to the discussion of this subject, and called out the strongest champions of the doctrines assailed.
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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THE expensiveness of apparatus has long been felt as a formidable difficulty in the effort to make scientific education popular and practicable. There is double hindrance here; the instruments of experiment are so costly that they cannot be procured for common use, and because of this expensiveness they have to be kept in careful charge, so that ordinary pupils cannot use them, and must content themselves merely to look on and see others work.
PopularScience_18771001_0011_006_0018.xml
article
762
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POPULAR MISCELLANY.
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THE American Association for the Advancement of Science met at Nashville, Tennessee, on Wednesday, August 29th, Prof. Simon Newcomb presiding. The sessions continued for four days. Prof. O. C.Marsh, of Yale College, was elected President of the Association for the present year; Prof. R. H. Thurston, of the Stevens Technological Institute, Hoboken, Vice-President of the Physical Section; Prof. Augustus R. Grote, Vice-President of the Section of Natural History; Prof. H. Carrington Bolton, of Columbia College, New York, General Secretary; Prof. Francis E. Nipher, St. Louis University, Secretary of Section A; George Little, Atlanta, Georgia, Secretary of Section B; William S. Vaux, Philadelphia, Treasurer; chairman of Chemical Sub-section, Prof. F. W. Clarke, of the University of Cincinnati.
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NOTES.
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ACCORDING to an estimate made by the Berlin Statistical Bureau, the total steam motive-power actually in use throughout the world is equal to 13,500,000 horse-power, or to the working force of 25,000,000 horses. SOME grains of wheat left in Polaris Bay (north latitude 81° 38') by Captain Hall’s expedition, in the year 1872, were carried to England by Captain Nares last year.
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advertisement
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Advertisement
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