Issue: 18761101

Wednesday, November 1, 1876
NOVEMBER, 1876
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Monday, December 29, 2014

Articles
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1
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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1
1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16
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WHAT AMERICAN ZOOLOGISTS HAVE DONE FOR EVOLUTION.
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PROFESSOR EDWARD S.
IT would be pleasant indeed if only a lecture or an essay were expected from the presiding officer of the Section; but an address implies a great deal more, and the giver of it is not only expected to be entertaining, where perhaps he never entertained before, but instructive upon grounds upon which, perchance, he has made but partial survey.
PopularScience_18761101_0010_001_0002.xml
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17
17,18,19,20,21,22,23
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THE EARLY HISTORY OF FIRE.1
OF THE FACULTY OF SCIENCES, TOULOUSE.
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PROFESSOR N. JOLY
FIRE, the common source of heat, of light, and of life, and the active principle of a multitude of industries, and of metallurgical industry in particular, is unquestionably one of the greatest conquests achieved by man over Nature. The discovery of fire was more than a benefit; it was, in fact, a giant stride on the road to civilization.
PopularScience_18761101_0010_001_0003.xml
article
23
23,24,25,26,27
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PHYSICAL SCIENCE IN ENGLISH SCHOOLS.
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AT a meeting of the British Association five years ago, the subject of science-teaching in our higher schools excited unusual interest. Not only were papers read and followed by enthusiastic discussion, but a committee was privately formed, including more than twenty leaders of the Association, all of whom undertook to combine in pressing the claims of science on our head-masters, and in offering counsel as to systems and methods, apparatus, and expenditure.
PopularScience_18761101_0010_001_0004.xml
article
27
27,28,29,30,31,32,33,34,35,36,37,38
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NATURE OF THE INVERTEBRATE BRAIN.
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PROFESSOR H. CHABLTON BASTIAN
IT now remains for us to consider the disposition of the nervous system in some of the principal types of the sub-kingdom Mollusca. These are animals wholly different in kind from those we have just been considering, mostly aquatic, and all of them devoid of hollow, articulated, locomotor appendages.
PopularScience_18761101_0010_001_0005.xml
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38
38,39,40,41,42,43
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PRENATAL AND INFANTILE CULTURE.1
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DR. E. SEGUIN
TO educate children for themselves is rare in Europe, and is considered rather quixotic. The youth of the people are merchantable commodities, soon to be credited to the party which puts its stamp upon them. Therefore, when they are worth having, they are picked up as eagerly as nuggets.
PopularScience_18761101_0010_001_0006.xml
article
43
43,44,45,46,47,48,49,50,51,52,53,54,55,56
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PEOEESSOE HUXLEY’S LECTUEES.1
THE THREE HYPOTHESES OF THE HISTORY OF NATURE.
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WE live and form part of a system of things of immense diversity and perplexity, which we call Nature, and it is a matter of the deepest interest to all of us that we should form just conceptions of the constitution of that system and of its past history.
PopularScience_18761101_0010_001_0007.xml
article
56
56,57,58,59
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THE MOON’S INFLUENCE ON THE WEATHER.1
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PROFESSOR M. A. F. PRESTEL.
A SUDDEN and considerable fall of the barometer is of frequent occurrence; but to find a case identical with that of November 22, 1873, I had to search my journals for many years back. It is worthy of note that, in 1854, an equally sudden and considerable fall of the barometer took place here on the coast of the North Sea on precisely the same days as in 1873.
PopularScience_18761101_0010_001_0008.xml
article
60
60,61,62,63,64,65,66,67,68,69,70,71,72
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DIFFICULTIES OF DEVELOPMENT AS APPLIED TO MAN.1
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ALFRED RUSSEL WALLACE
AS my own knowledge of and interest in anthropology are confined to the great outlines, rather than to the special details of the science, I propose to give a very brief and general sketch of the modern doctrine as to the Antiquity and Origin of Man, and to suggest certain points of difficulty which have not, I think, yet received sufficient attention.
PopularScience_18761101_0010_001_0009.xml
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72
72,73,74
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THE SO-CALLED “CONFLICT OF SCIENCE AND RELIGION.”1
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PRINCIPAL J. W. DAWSON
IT may be objected that, by the introduction of a cosmogony, the Bible exposes itself to a conflict with science, and that thereby injury results both to science and to religion. This is a grave charge, and one that evidently has had much weight with many minds, since it has been the subject of entire treatises designed to illustrate the history of this conflict or to explain its nature.
PopularScience_18761101_0010_001_0010.xml
article
75
75,76,77,78,79,80,81,82,83,84,85,86
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ASTRONOMY IN AMERICA.
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RICHARD A. PEOCTOR
DURING my visits to America in 1873-’74 and 1875-’76, I was led from time to time to notice with interest the progress and promise of astronomical science in America. My own special purpose in visiting America on these occasions partly brought these matters to my attention.
PopularScience_18761101_0010_001_0011.xml
article
86
86,87,88,89,90,91,92,93,94,95,96,97,98,99,100
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IS THE DEVELOPMENT HYPOTHESIS SUFFICIENT?
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DR. JAMES McCOSH
THIS paper has been occasioned by the lectures of a distinguished Englishman who has visited this country; but I am to keep very much to my general subject, and not enter upon a minute criticism of Prof. Huxley. In these lectures he has abstained from entering on those exciting topics bearing on materialism and religion, which he has discussed so freely in Edinburgh and in Belfast, and in his published writings.
PopularScience_18761101_0010_001_0012.xml
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100
100,101
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SKETCH OF DR. ARKOTT.
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AMONG the agencies for the diffusion of the knowledge of physics and the taste for its study in the past generation, few were more effective and successful than “The Elements of Physics,” a treatise for schools, by the author whose portrait will be found in the present number of the MONTHLY.
PopularScience_18761101_0010_001_0013.xml
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102
102,103
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CORRESPONDENCE.
To the Editor of the Popular Science Monthly.
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DEAR SIR: It has always been a matter of surprise to me that some of my contributions to botanical science should be regarded as attacks on the doctrines of Darwin, or as opposed to theories of evolution. At the conclusion of the reading of my papers it is often a subject of argument on which side I stand.
PopularScience_18761101_0010_001_0014.xml
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103
103,104,105,106,107,108
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
PROFESSOR HUXLEY'S LECTURES.
THE HELL-GATE EXPLOSION.
DR. DRAPER'S BOOK AT ROME.
AS REGARDS BISHOP COXE.
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PROF. HUXLEY arrived in this country tired out from prolonged overwork, and greatly needing rest. He did not wish to speak in public, but could not escape it. He went to Nash-ville to visit a sister whom he had not seen in thirty years, and, being strongly urged to make a public address there, he reluctantly consented, and spoke to a large concourse on an excessively hot clay.
PopularScience_18761101_0010_001_0015.xml
article
108
108,109,110,111,112
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIYED.
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THIS book is the result of an able effort to analyze the present relations of capital and labor, and to point out the directions whence future improvement in those relations must come. It has not the pretensions of an exhaustive treatise; nevertheless it is a study of the whole subject, and reaches to large conclusions.
PopularScience_18761101_0010_001_0016.xml
article
112
112,113,114,115,116,117,118,119,120,121,122,123,124.,125,126,127
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MISCELLANY.
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Supplement to the Glacial Theory.—At the Buffalo meeting of the American Association Prof. W. C. Kerr, State Geologist of North Carolina, read a paper accounting for the presence and characteristics of the drift or unstratified superficial deposits of North Carolina, which cannot be attributed to glacial action or the action of wat, and which has hitherto presented a somewhat puzzling problem to geologists.
PopularScience_18761101_0010_001_0017.xml
article
127
127,128
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NOTES.
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IN a recent Miscellany article on the cruise of the Challenger, it was stated that 4,975 fathoms, or five and a half miles, is the deepest trustworthy sounding yet made, excepting two by the Tuscarora, which showed a depth 600 feet greater. A correspondent has called our attention to a statement in No. IV. of the “ Science Primer Series,” to the effect that between the Azores and Bermudas a sounding had been obtained of seven and a half miles.
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