Issue: 18760801

Tuesday, August 1, 1876
AUGUST, 1876
4
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9
Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Articles
cover
383
383,384,385
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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385
385,386,387,388,389,390,391,392,393,394,395,396,397,398
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VOICE IN MAN AND IN ANIMALS.
OF THE PARIS ACADEMY OF SCIENCES.
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EMILE BLANCHARD
MAN possesses language, and makes large use of it, while, on the other hand, not even the most intelligent animals have the power of designating objects, or of translating sensations into articulate speech. In this respect the distinction between man and beast is very marked.
PopularScience_18760801_0009_004_0002.xml
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398
398,399,400,401,402,403,404,405,406,407,408,409
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OUR COMMON MOULDS.
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BYRON D. HALSTEAD
THE following remarks are from personal observations which have been made from time to time as circumstances would permit. For convenience, the term mould will be extended beyond its narrow technical meaning, and include all those forms of vegetable life which are usually designated by that name.
PopularScience_18760801_0009_004_0003.xml
article
409
409,410,411,412,413,414,415
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WHAT ARE SPECIES?
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PROF. T. H. HUXLEY
IN its most general acceptation the word “species” signifies a kind or sort of something, which something is the genus to which the species belongs. Thus, a black stone is a species of the genus stone; a gray horse is a species of the genus horse;
PopularScience_18760801_0009_004_0004.xml
article
416
416,417,418,419,420,421,422,423,424,425,426
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MALARIA.
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CHAKLES P. RUSSEL
THE terms malaria and miasm in medical phraseology include the causes of a large class of affections—what are known more particularly as zymotic diseases, which depend upon a variety of specific organic poisons whose essential nature, composition, and form, are mostly inappreciable as yet by scientific research.
PopularScience_18760801_0009_004_0005.xml
article
426
426,427,428,429,430
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ROCK-STRUCTURE.
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REV. J. MAGENS MELLO
THE study of rock-structure is one of great interest to the geologist, and not only does it teach him the various materials of which any particular rock is built up, but it will often lead him to the knowledge of wonderful facts relating to its origin and past history, and will enable him to trace some of the many changes to which it may have been subjected during the lapse of time.
PopularScience_18760801_0009_004_0006.xml
article
430
430,431,432,433,434,435,436,437,438
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THE APOTHEOSIS OF STEAM.
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JOHN S. HITTELL
IN a newspaper notice of a late book the critic complains that it is “an apotheosis of steam,” an offense which he does not explain, but he conveys the inference that the book mentioned attributes to steam and to its age too much influence and importance in human life.
PopularScience_18760801_0009_004_0007.xml
article
438
438,439,440,441,442,443,444,445,446,447,448
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ON THE BACKWARDNESS OF THE ANCIENTS IN NATURAL SCIENCE.
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CARL VON LITTROW
I CAN hardly be mistaken in holding that the ceremonies attending the installation of a rector of our university chiefly concern the students. Thus only can I account for the fact that on the one hand the newly-installed officer is burdened with the unpleasant duty of listening to a history of his own life, and, on the other, that he is required to deliver an address whose sole purpose is to make known the ground he occupies in science and in his teaching.
PopularScience_18760801_0009_004_0008.xml
article
448
448,449,450,451,452,453,454,455,456,457,458,459,460,461,462,463
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THE SPONTANEOUS-GENERATION CONTROVERSY.
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REV. W. H. DALLINGER
IN the present position of biological science in relation to this important and interesting question, any positive results which have a detinite bearing on the difficulties of the subject, and point hopefully to new methods of research, must be warmly welcomed.
PopularScience_18760801_0009_004_0009.xml
article
463
463,464,465,466,467
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SCIENCE IN THE ARGENTINE REPUBLIC.
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PROF. C. GILBERT WHEELER
MUCH is being done in the Argentine Republic of South America, not only for the advancement of general education, but for the extension of science. The foreign still preponderate over the native workers, yet there is a creditable showing of contributions to science on the part of the indigenous talent of the country.
PopularScience_18760801_0009_004_0010.xml
article
467
467,468,469,470,471,472,473,474,475,476,477,478,479
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AMERICAN COLLEGES VERSUS AMERICAN SCIENCE.
PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI.
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F. W. CLARKE
AMERICA, when compared with other first-class nations, occupies a low position in science. For every research published in our country, at least fifty appear elsewhere. England, France, Germany, Austria, Russia, Italy, and Sweden, outrank us as producers of knowledge.
PopularScience_18760801_0009_004_0011.xml
article
479
479,480,481,482,483,484,485,486,487,488,489,490
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SOCIAL EXPERIMENTS IN UTAH.
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J. H. BEADLE
THE social anomaly of Utah is of interest not only to the politician and the philanthropist, but also to the scientific student of society, whose object is simply to find out how the thing works. Though not claiming to be a sociologist, I have had considerable opportunity to observe the operation of social forces among the Mormons, and in this article I wish to present some conclusions that I have formed relating chiefly to the economical aspect of the matter.
PopularScience_18760801_0009_004_0012.xml
article
490
490,491,492
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SKETCH OF PROF. J. S. NEWBERRY, M. D., LL. D.
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JOHN STRONG NEWBERRY, whose portrait we give in the present number of the MONTHLY, was born December 22, 1822, at Windsor, Connecticut. He is sprung from old Puritan stock, his ancestors having formed part of a colony which, in 1635, emigrated from Dorchester in the colony of Massachusetts Bay, and made the first settlement in Connecticut, at Windsor.
PopularScience_18760801_0009_004_0013.xml
article
493
493,494
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CORRESPONDENCE.
EARLY TRANSCONTINENTAL EXPLORATIONS.
To the Editor of the Popular Science Monthly.
THE DISCOVERY OF A SPECIES OF BORING MOTH IN FLORIDA.
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SIR: Judge Daly’s address to the American Geographical Society, in the May number of THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, it appears to me, might lead the reader to infer that little was known, before General Fremont’s journey, of our country between the Mississippi and Pacific.
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article
494
494,495,496,497,498,499,500
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
THE PROMOTION OF SCIENCE.
CRIMINAL JUSTICE IN 1876.
PROF. HUXLEY'S LECTURES.
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THE importance of science is everywhere conceded. As affording a knowledge of the operations of Nature, which can be taken advantage of by multiplying the resources and increasing the productiveness of industry, and by guiding art into the most economical ways, everybody admits that science is doing a beneficent work for the world.
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article
500
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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THE first edition of this important work was issued in 1862, at a period when the public mind was startled by the rapid progress made in archaeological discovery, and by the evidence it afforded of the great antiquity of man upon the globe.
PopularScience_18760801_0009_004_0016.xml
article
506
506,507,508,509,510,511
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MISCELLANY.
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The Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia.—The Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia having, at the beginning of the present year, taken possession of its commodious new building, Prof. E. D. Cope avails himself of the occasion to suggest in the Penn Monthly some needed changes and improvements in its organization.
PopularScience_18760801_0009_004_0017.xml
article
511
511,512,513,514
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NOTES.
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THE Franklin Institute of the State of Pennsylvania has opened a reception-room at the northwest end of the Machinery Hall, Centennial Exhibition grounds. The following objects of great historical interest have been placed in the room: 1.
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