Issue: 18760601

Thursday, June 1, 1876
JUNE, 1876
2
True
9
Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Articles
cover
128
128,129
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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article
129
129,130,131,132,133,134,135,136,137
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LINGUAL DEVELOPMENT IN BABYHOOD
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H. TAINE.
THE following observations were made from day to day and taken down on the spot. The subject of them was a little girl, whose mental development took the ordinary course, being neither precocious nor the reverse. From the first, probably by reflex action, this child cried incessantly, kicked, moved all its limbs, and perhaps all its muscles.
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article
137
137,138,139,140
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NATURAL TRUMPET OF THE CRANE.
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FRANK BUCKLAND.
SPORTSMEN and naturalists, both at home and abroad, would do well to collect not only the skins of birds, but also to search for any peculiarity which may happen to occur in their internal structure, especially the bones and the larynx. Some weeks since, when calling upon my friend Mr. Jamrach, the animal-dealer, I observed in the back-yard, on the dust-heap, a number of dead birds.
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article
140
140,141,142,143,144,145,146,147,148,149,150,151,152,153,154,155,156,157
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PETROLEUM.1
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PROF. H. B. CORNWALL.
ALTHOUGH it has only lately acquired its present important place among articles of commerce, this valuable product of Nature’s laboratory has been known for ages, and was used for medicinal and illuminating purposes in ancient times. The petroleumspring of Zante, one of the Ionian Islands, was mentioned by Herodotus more than 2,000 years ago ; and Pliny says that the oil of a spring at Agrigentum, Sicily, was used in lamps.
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article
158
158,159,160,161,162,163,164,165,166,167,168,169,170,171,172,173
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LESSONS IN ELECTRICITY.1
HOLIDAY LECTURES AT THE ROYAL INSTITUTION.
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PKOF. TYNDALL, F. R. S.
III. SECTION 13. Electric Induction.—We have now to apply the theory of electric fluids to the important subject of electric induction. It was noticed by early observers that contact was not necessary to electrical excitement. Otto von Guericke, as we have already seen, found that a body brought near his sulphur globe became electrical.
PopularScience_18760601_0009_002_0005.xml
article
173
173,174,175,176,177,178
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HINTS FOR THE SICK-ROOM.
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WHEN a woman thinks of making deliberate choice of the profession of a sick-nurse, she can, of course, take into careful consideration if her character and temperament are or are not suited for so arduous and trying an avocation. If she is a person of excitable nature, and possessed of but little self-control, she can be wisely counseled to give up the idea of a life for which she is so thoroughly unfit ; but no peculiarities of character or temperament can exempt a woman from being called upon by the plain voice of duty, at one time or other of her life, to take her stand by the bedside of one dear to her, and soothe as best she may many a weary hour of restlessness and pain.
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article
178
178,179,180,181,182,183,184,185,186
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THE POLAR GLACIERS.
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C. C. MERRIMAN.
THE element of all others most sensitive to the changes and impulses of every kind of force is the earth’s atmosphere. It is in a state of constant disturbance, and seems to be obedient to no laws or regularity. Yet, unstable as the winds appear, they are really, in their general movements, among the most orderly and effective agents in Nature.
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article
186
186,187,188,189,190,191,192,193,194,195,196,197
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AXES AND HATCHETS, ANCIENT AND MODERN.1
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THE REV. ARTHUR RIGG,
TOOLS with cutting-edges are not only numerous and varied in form, but they are also varied in the purposes for which they are formed, and in the mode of using. Hence no very precise statement of what is generally meant by a “cutting-edge” can well be 1 ‘From a lecture delivered before the London Society of Arts.
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article
197
197,198,199,200,201
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SUBTERRANEAN STREAMS IN SOUTH CAROLINA.
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REV. ROBERT WILSON.
NEITHER the formations nor the phenomena described in this paper are peculiar to South Carolina, and the general subject has been frequently investigated in other limestone regions. The present writer, therefore, desires merely to offer some results of his own observation and experience as a contribution to the scientific literature of the subject.
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article
202
202,203,204,205,206,207,208,209,210,211
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MATHEMATICS IN EVOLUTION.
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GEORGE ILES.
WHILE we know that only Infinite Intelligence could reduce the entire phenomena of the universe to mathematical expression, it affords an observer constant surprise to find primitive laws of order and number recur again and again amid the infinite variety of Nature.
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article
211
211,212,213,214
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EXPERIMENTS ON HYPNOTISM.
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FRANKLIN CHASE CLARKE,
SOME time ago my attention was called to two articles on “ Hypnotism in Animals,” in the columns of THE POPULAR SCIENCE Monthly,1 in which I became very deeply interested. For the sake of those who may have forgotten what the author, Prof. Czermak, said in regard to these very curious phenomena as observed in fowls, I will briefly describe his mode of proceeding, and afterward give the results of my own experiments.
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article
215
215,216,217,218,219,220,221,222,223,224
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ORGANISMS AND THEIR MEDIA.
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H. CHARLTON BASTIAN,
HEAT and light are physical influences to which even the lowest units of living matter respond, whether their mode of life and nutrition is most akin to that of plants or to that of animals. These influences act on such organisms, either by stimulating, retarding, or otherwise modifying the chemical changes naturally occurring in their interior, and upon the existence of which their life depends.
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article
224
224,225,226,227,228,229,230,231
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SCIENCE AND THE LOGICIANS.
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DAVID BOYD,
UNDER the above heading may be comprehended the most of what we are desirous of saying in review of the article entitled “ Science and Religion,” by Dr. Charles F. Deems, in THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY for February. We first run counter to the author upon the definition of science taken from Sir William Hamilton’s “Logic.”
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article
231
231,232,233,234,235,236,237,238
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SKETCH OF BENJAMIN THOMPSON (COUNT RUMFORD).
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IN his late work, “ Recent Advances in Physical Science,” Prof. Tait, of the University of Edinburgh, has attempted a history of dynamical science, or rather of the doctrine of the conservation of energy. Though this great doctrine is recent in its completer development, Prof. Tait holds that it is implied in Newton’s laws of motion, and that Newton only failed to grasp it in its modern form for lack of certain experiments.
PopularScience_18760601_0009_002_0014.xml
article
239
239,240,241
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CORRESPONDENCE.
“WHAT CONSTITUTES RELIGION?”
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DEAR SIR : The use of my name twice in your notice of Mr. Fiske’s new work, on “The Unseen World,” in your May number, perhaps justifies me in soliciting a small space for comment on some expressions in that notice. You are defending Dr. Draper from Mr. Fiske’s trenchant attacks.
PopularScience_18760601_0009_002_0015.xml
article
241
241,242,243,244,245,246,247,248,249,250
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
WHO SHALL STUDY THE BABIES?
ENGLISH PHILOSOPHY IN GERMANY.
TEE RUMFORD MEDALS.
LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS KECEIYEJD.
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THE reader’s attention will be arrested by the novelty of our first article, by a distinguished literary Frenchman, giving the result of his observations on the progress of an infant in learning to talk. We confess to some mortification at seeing the name of a man at the head of such a discussion.
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article
250
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MISCELLANY.
NOTES.
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A Moth that bores for its Food.—The order of Lepidoptera, which includes moths and butterflies, is almost universally characterized as possessing a flexible trunk, by means of which the insects suck up the nectar of flowers. Indeed, the possession of a flexible trunk is commonly regarded as one of the distinguishing characteristics of this order.
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