Issue: 18760301

Wednesday, March 1, 1876
MARCH, 1876
5
True
8
Thursday, October 30, 2014

Articles
cover
512
512,513
[no value]
[no value]
THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_18760301_0008_005_0001.xml
article
513
513,514,515,516,517,518,519,520,521
[no value]
[no value]
HYDROGRAPHY.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HYDROGRAPHY (from the two Greek words, Űδωρ, water, and γρáϕω, description, is the important branch of physical science and descriptive geography which has for its object the graphical representation of the waters of our globe and their shores, with all their properties bearing upon navigation.
PopularScience_18760301_0008_005_0002.xml
article
521
521,522,523,524,525,526,527,528,529,530,531,532,533,534,535,536,537,538,539,540,541,542,543
[no value]
[no value]
LACE AND LACE-MAKING.1
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ELIZA A. YOUMANS
TO think of lace merely as a symbol of vanity is quite to miss its deeper significance. If the feeling that prompts to personal decoration be a proper one—and it is certainly a natural and universal sentiment—then lace has its defense, and we may agree with old Fuller of the seventeenth century, when he says : “Let it not be condemned for superfluous wearing, because it doth neither hide nor heat, seeing that it doth adorn.”
PopularScience_18760301_0008_005_0003.xml
article
543
543,544,345,546,547,548,549,550,551,552,553
[no value]
[no value]
OUR GREAT AMERICAN UNIVEESITY.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ABOUT five years ago we decided to found a new college. At that time our denomination had but seven in the State, not one of them first class, all beggarly, and the nearest fifty miles away. Brother A—alone demurred to the project, but, as he was more noted for mere abstract scholarship than for practical attainments, his objections were easily set aside.
PopularScience_18760301_0008_005_0004.xml
article
553
553,554,555,556,557,558,559,560,561,562,563,564,565,566,567,568,569,570
[no value]
[no value]
THE WARFARE OF SCIENCE.1
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ANDREW D. WHITE
I PASS, now, to fields of more immediate importance to us—to Anatomy and Medicine. It might be supposed that the votaries of sciences like these would be suffered to escape attack; unfortunately, they have had to stand in the thickest of the battle.
PopularScience_18760301_0008_005_0005.xml
article
570
570,571,572,573,574,575,576,577,578,579,580,581,582,583,584,585,586
[no value]
[no value]
ON FALLACIES OF TESTIMONY RESPECTING THE SUPERNATURAL.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WILLIAM B. CARPENTER
NO one who has studied the history of science can fail to recognize the fact that the rate of its progress has been in great degree commensurate with the degree of freedom from any kind of prepossession with which scientific inquiry has been conducted.
PopularScience_18760301_0008_005_0006.xml
article
586
586,587,588,589,590,591,592,593,594,595
[no value]
[no value]
THE FUNCTIONS OF ASSOCIATION IN ITS RELATION TO LABOR.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WILLIAM B. WEEDEN
THE writer is a member of a copartnership chiefly devoted to the business of manufacturing textile fabrics. Within twenty years this firm has divided interests in different mills with eight persons, who acted as superintendents or assistant superintendents of the mills in which they were engaged.
PopularScience_18760301_0008_005_0007.xml
article
595
595,596,597,598,599,600,601,602,603,604,605,606,607
[no value]
[no value]
MODERN PHILOSOPHICAL BIOLOGY.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DR. E. CAZELLE
BIOLOGY, or the science of life, is so new a subject of investigation that its limits are as yet imperfectly ascertained. Metaphysical ideas have too large a place in our conception of its extent. When we ask where biology commences, we are met by the problem of the origin of living things, which very often is solved in accordance rather with preconceived opinions of the system of the universe than with an independent scientific hypothesis.
PopularScience_18760301_0008_005_0008.xml
article
607
607,608,609,610,611,612,613,614,615,616,617
[no value]
[no value]
LESSONS IN ELECTRICITY.1
HOLIDAY LECTURES AT THE ROYAL INSTITUTION.
[no value]
[no value]
PROFESSOR TYNDALL
SECTION 1. Introduction.—Many centuries before Christ, it had been observed that yellow amber (elektron) when rubbed possessed the power of attracting light bodies. Thales, the founder of the Ionic philosophy (B. C. 580), imagined the amber to be endowed with a kind of life.
PopularScience_18760301_0008_005_0009.xml
article
617
617,618,619,620
[no value]
[no value]
NATURAL EUTHANASIA.1
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
B. W. RICHARDSON
BY the strict law of Nature a man should die as unconscious of his death as of his birth. Subjected at birth to what would be, in the after-conscious state, an ordeal to which the most cruel of deaths were not possibly more severe, he sleeps through the process, and only upon the subsequent awakening feels the impressions, painful or pleasant, of the world into which he is delivered.
PopularScience_18760301_0008_005_0010.xml
article
620
620,621,622,623,624,625,626
[no value]
[no value]
SKETCH OF HERBERT SPENCER.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HERBERT SPEHCER was born in Derby, April 27, 1820. He comes of a race of pedagogues—his father, grandfather, and uncles, having followed the profession of teaching. He has written a book upon education, which some people think “ theoretical ; ” but it was a product of experience, for he was himself subjected to much the same method as that he lays down in his work.
PopularScience_18760301_0008_005_0011.xml
article
627
627,628
[no value]
[no value]
CORRESPONDENCE.
“THE CONFLICT OF THE AGES.”
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DEAR SIR : I have read this morning, with great pleasure, the article by President White, in the February number of your magazine ; and am free to express gratification at seeing the extracts from my Vanderbilt University Address placed in such “ goodlie companie.”
PopularScience_18760301_0008_005_0012.xml
article
629
629,630,631,632,633
[no value]
[no value]
EDITOR’S TABLE.
HISTORY AND THE CENTENNIAL.
RETROSPECTS OF OUR PAST HUNDRED YEARS.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE are symptoms of a revival of the study of history, or of a new impulse to it, as a consequence of the fact that the life of the nation has reached a round hundred years. Histories of the United States are in special order, and histories of the world for common schools are copiously forthcoming.
PopularScience_18760301_0008_005_0013.xml
article
634
634,635,636,637
[no value]
[no value]
LITERARY NOTICES.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE author of this work stands among the very foremost in the school of modern scientific psychology, which has its chief development in Great Britain. His two principal works, “ The Senses and Intellect” and “The Emotions and the Will,” are widely known as giving the only complete and systematic account of mental phenomena from a modern point of view.
PopularScience_18760301_0008_005_0014.xml
article
637
637,638
[no value]
[no value]
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Native Races of the Pacific States. By H. H. Bancroft. Vol. V. New York: D. Appleton & Co. Price, $5.50. Pp. 796. Angola and the River Congo. By J. J. Monteiro. Pp. 366. New York: Macmillah. Price, $2.50. The Christ of Paul. By George Reber. Pp. 397. New York: Somerby.
PopularScience_18760301_0008_005_0015.xml
article
638
638,639
[no value]
[no value]
MISCELLANY.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Exhibition of Scientific Apparatus.— There will be opened next April, at the South Kensington Crystal Palace, London, a universal exposition of scientific instruments. This exposition will continue for six months. Its object is to bring together as large a number as possible of scientific instruments possessing an historic interest, for instance, Tycho Brahe’s astrolabes, Galileo’s telescopes, Lavoisier’s balances, Franklin’s lightning-rods, the remnants of Charles’s balloons, Giffard’s injector, Leon Foucault’s pendulum and gyroscope, etc.
PopularScience_18760301_0008_005_0016.xml
article
640
640,641
[no value]
[no value]
NOTES.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE Smithsonian Institution is making a collection to illustrate, at the Centennial Exhibition, the resources of the United States as derived from the animal kingdom. This collection will embrace specimens of the animals of the United States which are hunted or collected for economical purposes ; the products derived from the various species ; also the apparatus or devices employed by hunters, trappers, sportsmen, and others.
PopularScience_18760301_0008_005_0017.xml