Issue: 18750501

Saturday, May 1, 1875
MAY, 1875
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Wednesday, November 26, 2014

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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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SEA-ANEMONES.
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REV. S. LOCKWOOD
EVEN in minds the most illiterate you will find a sort of philosophy, if you but look for it. Among the dwellers by the shore is a class known as Watermen. These men, with great irregularities of toil and idleness, obtain the support of their families wholly from the bounteous, though sometimes precarious, harvest of the sea.
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THE FIEST TEACES OF MAN IN EUEOPE.
II.
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PROF. ALBRECHT MUELLER
WE have been concerned heretofore with the human and animal remains of the older Diluvium. We come now to the upper and more recent layers of that formation. In these, the formerly so abundant remains of the cave-bear are wholly wanting, those of the mammoth very rare.
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SCIENTIFIC PROPHECY.
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PROPHECY is the prediction of an event—the declaration of something to come. When future events—either in the history of the world or in the life of man—have been foretold from no known data and from no law, the prophecy must have been divine, for none but God can know the future of man.
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THE CHEMICAL RADIATIONS.
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WITH that proneness to go wrong, which we notice in most things human, and which crops out in science as well as elsewhere, the art of making pictures by the chemical action of radiant forces has got a false name. This is all the worse, as it was at first correctly designated, and that too by him who had the clearest right to give the process a title.
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ON SOME OF THE RESULTS OF THE EXPEDITION OF H. M. S. CHALLENGER.
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PROF. THOMAS H. HUXLEY, F. K. S.
IN May, 1873, I drew attention, in the pages of this Revieiew, to the important problems connected with the physics and natural history of the sea, to the solution of which there was every reason to hope the cruise of H. M. S. Challenger would furnish important contributions. The expectation then expressed has not been disappointed.
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EVOLUTION AKD THE AFTER-LIFE.
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E. OSGOOD MASON, A. M., M. D.
FEW persons are able to escape some form of belief in the existence of a soul. Whatever view we may take of its origin, gradations, or development, whether the infinite soul, the human, the animal, and the “soul of things,” are each only manifestations in different degrees of the same great principle, or each enlargement and refinement in the ascending series is to be considered a development, or whether nothing is to be dignified as soul except that which is manifested through human forms—whatever views we may have regarding its limitations and destiny—we cannot escape the conviction that there is, in man at least, a distinct entity, a combination of faculties, a blending of sensation, will, and wisdom, which we call soul.
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ADDRESS TO MEDICAL STUDENTS.
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E. A. WASHBURN, D. D.
I AM glad of the privilege, gentlemen of the Medical College, of meeting to-day so many who are masters and students in the school of science. For if, as I believe, all our studies, whether of Nature or mind, are only chapters of one book, there can be nothing wiser in our day, when the growing mass of learning almost compels a microscopic research and somewhat of a microscopic bias—nothing wiser than at times to interchange our points of view.
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THE DEEPER HARMONIES OF SCIENCE AND RELIGION.1
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THERE are two very opposite parties among us at the present day, whose language is in one respect very strikingly similar. The Christian Church has from the beginning spoken with a certain contempt of learning. “The wisdom of the world,” “ oppositions of science falsely so called,” “to the Greeks foolishness;” these are the phrases of one of the earliest and highest of Christian authorities.
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MODERN STREET_PAITEMENTS.
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ADOLF CLUSS, C. E.
THE most distinguished sanitariaris of the age have established the fact that our modern cities are mostly so located that public health depends much less upon climate and position than upon rational conditions and modes of life. Enforced cleanliness, and the progress of sanitary works in cities, are followed by an enhanced vitality and elasticity of mind still more than by longevity of the inhabitants.
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DISCOURSE ON THE DEATH OF LYELL.
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DEAN STANLEY
DEAN STANLEY selected for his sermon the words of the second verse of the first chapter of Genesis: "The earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters." The sermon was, in fact, a discourse on the religious aspect of geology.
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THE PHYSIOLOGY OF AUTHORSHIP.
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R. E. FRANCILLON
THERE is a botanical theory that a flower is nothing more than a leaf in which full development has been arrested. It is more beautiful than the leaf by reason, not of its perfection, but of its imperfection. Even so the leaf is a degenerate twig and the fruit a degenerate flower: so that productiveness comes from the loss of vital strength, and not, as would be assumed at first sight, from its increase.
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SKETCH OF DR. WILLIAM WHEWELL.
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DR. WILLIAM WHEWELL stands highest in the literary world as the historian of science. His “History of the Inductive Sciences” is not a mere bald narration of the facts and details of scientific progress, but is a philosophical treatment of the subject, which shows the growth and advancement of principles or general truths.
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CORRESPONDENCE.
TO WHAT EXTENT IS EVOLUTION VISIBLE?
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“IT is less unphilosophical to suppose that each spekkcies has been evolved from a predecessor by a modification of its parts, than that it has suddenly started into existence out of nothing. Nor is there much weight in the remark that no man has ever witnessed such a transformation taking place.
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
TO OUR PATRONS.
LACTOMETRY AND MORALS.
DEAN STANLEY'S SERMON.
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SIX volumes of THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY are now published, and with this number it enters upon its fourth year. We remind our friends of this, that they may renew their subscriptions, and we trust they will urge their neighbors to join them in taking the MONTHLY, as thereby it may be obtained at a cheaper rate.
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LITERARY NOTICES.
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THE readers of THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY cannot fail to learn with pleasure that the complete essays of this gifted young author are now accessible in a single compact volume to the American public. Several of Papillon’s masterly articles have appeared in our pages, and they awakened so deep an interest in the subjects considered, and were read with so much admiration, that it was felt to be important that all his principal papers should be reproduced in a separate issue.
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MISCELLANY.
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The Fog-Signal Question.—The elaborate articles on “ The Atmosphere in Relation to Fog-Signaling,” by Prof. Tyndall, which appeared in our March and April numbers, embodied the interesting results of a new and important research, and have attracted much attention, both on the part of our men of science and of many unscientific readers.
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NOTES.
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S. AUGUSTO GUATTARI, of Castellamare, Italy, has devised an improvement in pneumatic telegraphs, consisting of an instrument which will serve either as a transmitter or receiver. By means of two such instruments, placed at different stations and connected by a single air-conducting tube, messages may be transmitted in either direction.
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