Issue: 18750101

Friday, January 1, 1875
JANUARY, 1875
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Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Articles
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257
257
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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256
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CRYSTALLINE AND MOLECULAR FORCES.1
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PROF. JOHN TYNDALL
A FEW years ago I paid a visit to a large school in the country, and was asked by the principal to give a lesson to one of his classes. I agreed to do so, provided he would let me have the youngest boys in his school. To this he willingly assented; and, after casting about in my mind as to what could be said to the little fellows, I went to a village hard by and bought a quantity of sugar-candy.
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EVOLUTION IN ORNAMENT.
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CH. FRED. HARTT
ON the two Morgan Expeditions to the Amazonas, in 1870 and 1871, there was obtained from a burial-mound on the island of Marajó, or Johannes, a lot of ancient pottery, consisting of burialurns, idols, utensils of various kinds, personal ornaments, etc., many of which were richly ornamented with grecques, and scrolled borders of a very high order of development.
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276
276,277,278,279,280,281
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THE FUTURE OF CHEMISTRY.
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F. W. CLARKE
EVERY science seems to have, as a science, its most rapid and brilliant growth during the earlier portions of its history. By this I do not intend to say that the mere bulk of its material increases more swiftly than at a later period, when the number of its students and investigators has become great.
PopularScience_18750101_0006_003_0004.xml
article
281
281,282,283,284,285,286,287,288,289,290,291,292
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CONCERNING BEARS.
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WILLIAM E. SIMMONS
THE bear family (Ursidœ), though comprising a comparatively small number of species, is yet one of the most wide-spread of all the carnivora, being found all over the earth’s surface, except in Africa and Australia. In the latter country, there is an animal somewhat resembling the bear in appearance, and having the tree-climbing habit, known popularly as the Australian bear.
PopularScience_18750101_0006_003_0005.xml
article
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WOMAN’S PLACE IN NATURE.
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FRANCES EMILY WHITE
PROGRESS in knowledge is defined by Herbert Spencer as “the bringing of thoughts into harmony with things.” Plato enunciated the same great truth more than two thousand years ago. “Man,” he says, “is not a system-builder; his loftiest attainment reaches no higher than this: through endeavor, through discipline, through virtue, he may see what is."
PopularScience_18750101_0006_003_0006.xml
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THE HERMIT OF RED-COAT’S GREEN.
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DANIEL H. TUKE
EVERYBODY remembers Mopes, the “slothful, unsavory, nasty reversal of the laws of human nature”—Dickens’s famous character of “Tom Tiddler’s Ground.” The recent death of the original of that sketch has attracted fresh notice to his strange mode of life.
PopularScience_18750101_0006_003_0007.xml
article
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ADDRESS BEFORE THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION.1
Mathematical Investigations in Physics.
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PROF. JOSEPH LOVERING
I AM thus suddenly brought face to face with the second head of my subject: the mathematical and philosophical state of the physical sciences. The luminiferous ether and the undulatory theory of light have always troubled what is supposed to be the imperturbable character of the mathematics.
PopularScience_18750101_0006_003_0008.xml
article
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REASON AGAINST ROUTINE IN THE TEACHING OF LANGUAGE.
FROM THE FRENCH OF CLAUDE MARCEL.
PART I.— What Reason prescribes.
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TWO DIFFERENT CLASSES OF LANGUAGES.—The mode of teaching living and dead languages is nearly the same. The differences between these two classes of languages, and the ends sought in studying them, need to be better defined. Living languages, like the mother-tongue, are simple instruments which cannot be too soon mastered for instruction in our own social relations, and information of the political, scientific, and industrial life of other people.
PopularScience_18750101_0006_003_0009.xml
article
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331,332,333,334,335,336,337,338,339
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EMOTIONS IN THE PRIMITIVE MAN.
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HERBERT SPENCER
A MEASURE of evolution in living things is, the degree of correspondence between changes in the organism and coexistences and sequences in the environment. In the “Principles of Psychology,” it was shown that mental development is “an adjustment of inner to outer relations that gradually extends in Space and Time, that becomes increasingly special and complex, and that has its elements ever more precisely coõrdinated and more completely integrated.”
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article
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BIOLOGY FOR YOUNG BEGINNERS.1
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SARAH HACKETT STEVENSON
UNDER the low eaves at the back of the house was a long, deep wooden trough for catching the rain that fell on the roof. This old trough was to me a never-failing source of wonder and delight during my childhood. The inside of it was all lined with a beautiful, green, velvety mould, and, when there had been no rain for some time, the water itself would turn a greenish color.
PopularScience_18750101_0006_003_0011.xml
article
355
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SKETCH OF DR. JEFFRIES WYMAN.
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BURT G. WILDER
WITHIH a year, science has lost two of her greatest leaders, Louis Agassiz and Jeffries Wyman. With the life, the works, and the appearance of the one, all are familiar. But the other was hardly known outside of strictly scientific circles. He rarely gave popular lectures, and never wrote any thing that attracted general attention.
PopularScience_18750101_0006_003_0012.xml
article
361
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EDITOR’S TABLE.
THE CONFLICT OF RELIGION AND SCIENCE.
NORMAL CO-EDUCATION.
“BACKING OUT."
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IT is a common remark that there is no necessary hostility between religion and science; and this is unquestionably true. That they will be ultimately harmonized we cannot doubt; but the world is very far from having yet reached that blessed consummation.
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LITERARY NOTICES.
PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.
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THIS long-expected work has at last made its appearance, and comes forth with such completeness that those who have been impatient of its delay will be glad that the author has taken the time needed to do justice to a formidable undertaking.
PopularScience_18750101_0006_003_0014.xml
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MISCELLANY.
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Climate of the Glacial Period.—This subject is discussed, in the October number of the Quarterly Journal of Science, by Mr. Thomas Belt. The cold of the glacial epoch, he thinks, was caused neither by elevation of the land in high latitudes, nor by the position of the earth due to the eccentricity of its orbit, as suggested by Lyell, Croll, and others; but rather by great obliquity of the ecliptic.
PopularScience_18750101_0006_003_0015.xml
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382
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NOTES.
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DURING the summer, the division of the geological and geographical survey of the Territories under the charge of Prof. Powell explored Northeastern, Middle, and Southeastern Utah. In addition to the geographical and geological work, the expedition has collected, according to the Tribune, many interesting facts in ethnography.
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