Issue: 18730101

Wednesday, January 1, 1873
JANUARY, 1873
03
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Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Articles
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256
256,257
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
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THE STUDY OF SOCIOLOGY.
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HERBERT SPENCER
IF you watch the management of a child by a mother of small capacity, you may be struck by the inability she betrays to imagine the child's thoughts and feelings. Full of energy which he must expend in some way, and eager to see every thing, her little boy is every moment provoking her by his restlessness.
PopularScience_18730101_0002_003_0002.xml
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280,281,282,283,284,285,286,287,288,289,290,291,292,293
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SPONTANEOUS MOVEMENTS IN PLANTS.
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ALFRED W. BENNETT, M. A., B. Sc., F. L. S.
THAT there are no "hard and fast lines" in Nature is a truth which is more and more forcing itself upon the minds of men of science. The older naturalists delighted to circumscribe their own special domains within sharply-marked boundaries, which no trespassers were allowed to pass.
PopularScience_18730101_0002_003_0003.xml
article
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LIGHT AND LIFE.
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FERNAND PAPILLON
THE organized being that we observe on the surface of the globe does not subsist solely by the nourishment absorbed, sometimes in the form of aliment, sometimes in that of atmospheric air ; it needs besides, heat, electricity, and light, which are like a secret and lifegiving spring for the world.
PopularScience_18730101_0002_003_0004.xml
article
311
311,312,313,314,315,316,317,318,319,320
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A NEW PHASE OF GERMAN THOUGHT.
THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE UNCONSCIOUS.
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HARTMANN adopts the following words as the title of his principal work: "Speculative results according to the inductive method of the natural sciences." If we were to trust to these words, we might suppose that the author's system takes an essentially scientific form, and relies exclusively on the observation and analysis of facts.
PopularScience_18730101_0002_003_0005.xml
article
320
320,321,322,323,324,325,326
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EVOLUTION AND THE SPECTROSCOPE.
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F. W. CLARKE
MEN of science may be divided into two great classes—thinkers and observers. And, although both classes are often represented in one individual, the distinction between them is practically valid. For, in classifying mankind, no sharp boundaries can be drawn.
PopularScience_18730101_0002_003_0006.xml
article
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DR. LIVINGSTONE.
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L. J. PROCTER
DAVID LIVINGSTONE was born at Glasgow early in the present century. His grandfather was originally the occupier of a small farm in Ulva, one of the Hebrides, but, owing to the requirements of a large family, found himself obliged to quit his island home to seek employment at the Blantyre cotton works on the Clyde, above Glasgow.
PopularScience_18730101_0002_003_0007.xml
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ARTS IN THE STONE AGE.1
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WHEN Shakespeare represented his philosophical Duke as finding " sermons in stones," and " books in the running brooks," he was but unconsciously exhibiting the prophetic faculty which has been attributed to all true poets. He could hardly have foreseen that his pretty yet fanciful conceit would one day be found to be sober earnest.
PopularScience_18730101_0002_003_0008.xml
article
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356,357,358,359,360
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CULTIVATING WILD-FLOWERS.
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PROF. SAMUEL LOCKWOOD
BUT few are aware of the many American wild-flowers which merit and would repay cultivation. The showy scarlet sage (Salvia coccinea) is a common sea-coast weed in some of the extreme Southern States. In the North it has deservedly become a favorite ; and culture has placed it within the reach of every one, even the poorest.
PopularScience_18730101_0002_003_0009.xml
article
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360,361,362,363,364,365
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THE VELOCITY OF THE WILL.
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R. RADAU
IT is a common idea that the saying " as quick as thought " expresses the ne plus ultra of speed—an unapproachable rapidity, instantaneous and lightning-like. The phrase seems used, indeed, as an hyperbole ; but in one sense, at least, this is a mistake.
PopularScience_18730101_0002_003_0010.xml
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ASTRONOMICAL AND PHYSICAL OBSERVATORIES.
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IT has been said that " dirt is but matter out of place," and we may likewise take for an axiom that error is force misapplied. It cannot be complained that the age in which we live is one which demands the most careful economy of our forces of all kinds, nor are we intellectually in the position which geologists are fond of predicting for the material world—" nearly out of our store of force." But it were wisdom in us to husband the forces we have, that we may hand down to our successors a thoroughly well-ordered system in all things.
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article
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EDITOR'S TABLE.
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EDITOR'S TABLE.
OBSERVATION IN EDUCATION.
DEATH OF MR. GREELEY.
TYNDALL AND FROUDE.
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AN excellent article in the Tribune urges the need of more and better-educated observers to carry on the work of science. Prof. Agassiz is quoted as urging the establishment, in San Francisco, of a college for the training of skilled scientific observers.
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LITERARY NOTICES.
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LITERARY NOTICES.
BOOKS RECEIVED.
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FARADAY AS A DISCOVERER : By JOHN TYNDALL. New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1868. MICHAEL FARADAY: By Dr. J. H. GLADSTONE, F. R. S. London : 1872. NOTICE SUR MICHEL FARADAY, sa Vie et ses Travaux : A. DE LA RIVE. Geneva : 1867. THE name of Faraday has been a familiar one to all of us for many years.
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MISCELLANY.
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Experiments on Sound.—Prof. Mayer, of the Hoboken Technological Institute, N. J., has made some rare and remarkable researches on sound, of which he lately gave an account before the Lyceum of Natural History, New York. The following is a summary of the views he presented : That sound reaches the ear by a series of waves or undulations, is a generally-accepted fact.
PopularScience_18730101_0002_003_0014.xml
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384,385
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NOTES.
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THE Volcano of Santorin, when last visited, in October, 1871, had ceased giving the small eruptions which had been common almost without intermission since the great eruption of 1866, and the summit of the crater, covered with great blocks of lava, presented the same appearance as in 1707.
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