Issue: 18720501

Wednesday, May 1, 1872
MAY TO OCTOBER, 1872
1
True
1
Friday, November 28, 2014

Articles
cover
0_1
0_1,0_2
[no value]
[no value]
THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_18720501_0001_001_0001.xml
article
0_3
0_3,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17
[no value]
[no value]
THE STUDY OF SOCIOLOGY.
I.—Our Need of It.
[no value]
[no value]
HERBEKT SPENCER
OVER his pipe in the village ale-house, the laborer says very positively what Parliament should do about the " foot and mouth disease." At the farmer's market-table his master makes the glasses jingle as, with his fist, he emphasizes the assertion that he did not get half enough compensation for his slaughtered beasts during the cattleplague.
PopularScience_18720501_0001_001_0002.xml
article
17
17,18,19,204,21,22,23,24,25
[no value]
[no value]
THE RECENT ECLIPSE OF THE SUN.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. A. PROCTOR
THE eclipse of the sun which took place on December 12th last was looked forward to by astronomers with some anxiety, because many months must pass before they will have any similar opportunity of studying the sun's surroundings. Year after year, for four years in succession, there have been total eclipses of the sun—in each year one —and each eclipse has taught us much that has been worth knowing; but during the present year there will be no total solar eclipse worth observing; there will be none in 1873, only one (and not a very important one) in 1874, while during the total eclipse of 1875 the moon's shadow will traverse a path very inconveniently situated for intending observers.
PopularScience_18720501_0001_001_0003.xml
article
26
26,27,28,29,30,31,32,33,34,35,36,37,38,39,40
[no value]
[no value]
SCIENCE AND IMMORTALITY.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
REV. T. W. FOWLE
HE who pretends to have any thing new to say upon so old a subject as the immortality of the soul, must expect to arouse certainly opposition, and probably contempt. Nevertheless, this at least is certain, that the tendency of science, which has powerfully affected every domain of thought in new and unexpected ways, cannot but place the old doctrine of immortality under new and, it may be, unexpected lights, abolishing old arguments, and suggesting new ones that have not yet obtained the consideration they deserve.
PopularScience_18720501_0001_001_0004.xml
article
40
40,41,42,43,44,45
[no value]
[no value]
THE SOURCE OF LABOR.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SCIENCE has taught us that the processes going on around us are but changes, not annihilations and creations. With the eye of knowledge, we see the candle slowly turning into invisible gases, nor doubt for an instant that the matter of which the candle was composed is still existing, ready to reappear in other forms.
PopularScience_18720501_0001_001_0005.xml
article
45
45,46,47,48,49,50,51,52,53,54,55
[no value]
[no value]
QUETELET ON THE SCIENCE OF MAN.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. B. TYLOR
TWO lines of research into the Science of Man, of the highest moment as well in theoretical Anthropology as in practical Ethics and Politics, both to be always associated with the name of Quetelet, are now discussed at large in his Social Physics and Anthropometry.
PopularScience_18720501_0001_001_0006.xml
article
55
55,56,57,58,59,60,61
[no value]
[no value]
DISINFECTION AND DISINFECTANTS.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WILLIAM EASSIE
THERE are certain rules to be promulgated respecting the protection of human life from contagion, or from the injurious effects of decomposing organic matters, which may be gleaned from the experience of ages, and which as yet have never been laid down with sufficient clearness.
PopularScience_18720501_0001_001_0007.xml
article
61
61,62,63,64,65,66,67,68,69,70,71,72,73,74,75
[no value]
[no value]
THE NATURAL HISTORY OF MAN.
A COURSE OF LECTURES AT THE IMPERIAL ASYLUM OF VINCENNES.
I.—The Unity of the Human Species.
[no value]
[no value]
A. DE QUATREFAGES
GENTLEMEN: Each of my fellow-laborers in science comes here to lecture to you; they each select the subject which habitually occupies them. Some tell you of the heavens, the earth, the waters ; from others you get the history of vegetables and animals.
PopularScience_18720501_0001_001_0008.xml
article
75
75,76,77,78,79,80,81,82
[no value]
[no value]
THE CAUSES OF DYSPEPSIA.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ARTHUR LEARED
THE digestive power may be compared to the physical strength. Every individual can without inconvenience carry a certain weight, while any addition to it is accompanied by a proportionate sense of oppression. In the same way, what is called indigestion is often simply a result of excess.
PopularScience_18720501_0001_001_0009.xml
article
82
82,83,84,85,86,87,88,89,90,91,92,93,94
[no value]
[no value]
WOMAN AND POLITICAL POWER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LUKE OWEN PIKE
IT is not improbable that the present remarkable phase in woman's history may have made its appearance, partly at least, through reaction against the very common opinion that the male is the superior sex. This idea, offensive as it is to all feminine sentiment, receives its best illustration in the old fable, according to which, various parts of the body, each being necessary to the rest, put in a claim, each, to superiority.
PopularScience_18720501_0001_001_0010.xml
article
95
95,96,97,98,99,100
[no value]
[no value]
THE EAELY SUPEKSTITIONS OF MEDICINE.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. B. CHEADLE
IN the earlier ages of mankind, when the knowledge of Nature was small, and confined to priests and sages, their explanations were received with a simple childlike faith by the people, who cared not, or, if they cared, dared not to question or inquire further.
PopularScience_18720501_0001_001_0011.xml
article
101
101,102,103,104,105,106,107,108,109,110,111,112
[no value]
[no value]
PREHISTORIC TIMES.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DR. T. M. COAN
ETHNOLOGY is passing at present through a phase from which older sciences have safely emerged. The new views with reference to the antiquity of man are still looked upon by some persons with distrust and apprehension. Yet, says the distinguished author, of whose researches we are about to give some account, these new views " will, I doubt not, in a few years, be regarded with as little disquietude as are now those discoveries in astronomy and geology which at one time excited even greater opposition."
PopularScience_18720501_0001_001_0012.xml
article
113
113,114,115,116,117
[no value]
[no value]
EDITOR'S TABLE.
PURPOSE AND PLAN Of OUR ENTERPRISE.
THE WORK OF PROF. MORSE.
THE SCIENCE OF SOCIETY.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE POPULAE SCIENCE MONTHLY has been started to help on the work of sound public education, by supplying instructive articles on the leading subjects of scientific inquiry. It will contain papers, original and selected, on a wide range of subjects, from the ablest scientific men of different countries, explaining their views to non-scientific people.
PopularScience_18720501_0001_001_0013.xml
article
117
117,118,119,120,121,122
[no value]
[no value]
LITERARY NOTICES.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS is a very interesting volume on a fascinating subject. Dr. Chadbourne is well known as an able student of natural history, which he has long cultivated both by independent observation and in a philosophic spirit, and in this little book he gives the results of much study of instinctive action as displayed in the lower animals, and of much reflection on its bearings upon the mental and moral nature of man.
PopularScience_18720501_0001_001_0014.xml
article
122
122,123,124,125,126,127
[no value]
[no value]
MISCELLANY.
SOUTHERN ALASKA.
HINTS ON HOUSE-BUILDING.
CONCERNING CROOKES.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN addressing you this evening, gentlemen, I have in some sort to throw myself on the forbearance of the Society, for, though I have been able to bring certain ideas together on the subject on which I desire to speak, I have not, for want of time, been able to adopt a form of words such as I would have liked.
PopularScience_18720501_0001_001_0015.xml
article
128
128,129
[no value]
[no value]
NOTES.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MECHANISM OF THOUGHT.—AN important paper was read at the last meeting of the Medico-Chirurgical Society of London on this interesting but very complicated subject, by Dr. Broadbent. His theory was based partly on the results of his own dissections, partly on remarkable cases of loss of speech and paralysis that either came under his own notice or have been recorded by others.
PopularScience_18720501_0001_001_0016.xml