Issue: 20021101

Friday, November 1, 2002
November
11
True
66
Wednesday, January 7, 2015

Articles
cover
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popular PHOTOGRAPHY
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0001.xml
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0_2,1
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Canon: EOS D60
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Canon
EOS D60
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0002.xml
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2
2,3
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Advertisement
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0003.xml
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4
4
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Energizer: Energizer e2 AA Lithium batteries
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Energizer
Energizer e2 AA Lithium batteries
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0004.xml
tableOfContents
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5
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popular PHOTOGRAPHY
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0005.xml
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6
6
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Advertisement
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0006.xml
masthead
6
6
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popular PHOTOGRAPHY
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0007.xml
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7
7
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Canon U.S.A., Inc.: i850 Photo Printer
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Canon U.S.A., Inc.
i850 Photo Printer
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0008.xml
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8
8,9
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Nikon: Nikon D100 Digital SLR
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Nikon
Nikon D100 Digital SLR
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0009.xml
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10
10
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PENTAX: PENTAX OPTIO DIGITAL CAMERA
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PENTAX
PENTAX OPTIO DIGITAL CAMERA
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0010.xml
article
11
11,12
SNAP SHOTS
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SNAP SHOTS
Don’t paws—bid on puppy pix!
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Buying a cute puppy photo like the one shown here can help Cambodian kids because the money will benefit the Angkor Hospital For Children. To participate in this effort, get thee hence to the 6th Annual Friends of Friends Photography Auction at the Swann Galleries in NYC on December 11, 2002.
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0011.xml
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13
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Kodak: EasyShare LS443
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Kodak
EasyShare LS443
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0012.xml
article
14
14,15
FILM
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Multiplexposures
Why stop at just one subject—try two, three, or four of a kind —and people will look twice.
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Marie Triller
Woven into every corner of my photographic past and present is a love affair with visual rhythm. That's what I saw and responded to in these portraits of two or more nearly identical subjects. Their repetitive quality creates an unmistakable beat I call the visual pulse of life.
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0013.xml
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16
16,17
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Epson America, Inc.: Epson Stylus Photo 2200 ink jet printer
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Epson America, Inc.
Epson Stylus Photo 2200 ink jet printer
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0014.xml
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18
18
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Advertisement: Sunpak 8001 UT tripod
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Sunpak 8001 UT tripod
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0015.xml
article
19
19,20,22,24,25,199
NATURE
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Why a DUCT TAPE?
Because it holds my stuff together while I do a full nelson on my tripod.
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TIM FITZHARRIS
For about six months each year I’m in the field shooting, nearly always in locations away from my home in New Mexico. I expose, on average, five rolls of 220 film per day for both scenic and macro shooting. If I’m photographing wildlife in 35mm format, I budget double this amount.
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0016.xml
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21
21
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MAMIYA AMERICA CORPORATION: MAMIYA 645AFD
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MAMIYA AMERICA CORPORATION
MAMIYA 645AFD
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0017.xml
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22
22
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HOYA: Hoya multi-coated (HMC) filters
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HOYA
Hoya multi-coated (HMC) filters
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0018.xml
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23
23
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THK Photo Products, Inc.: SLIK professional tripods
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THK Photo Products, Inc.
SLIK professional tripods
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0019.xml
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24
24
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Advertisements
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E-Book Systems Inc.
Standard
E-Book Systems Inc.
Professional
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0020.xml
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25
25
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Advertisements
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Tamrac, Inc.
Photo Sling Pack Velocity 7 5747
Tamrac, Inc.
S.A.S. Quick-Load Film Pack
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0021.xml
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26
26
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ACD SYSTEMS: ACDSee 5.0
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ACD SYSTEMS
ACDSee 5.0
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0022.xml
article
27
27,28,29
YOUR BEST SHOT
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Want to avoid the picture-taking blahs? Get into the blues!
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"Your Best Shot" Entry Rules: You may send up to 20 of your best shots (transparencies or prints no larger than 8×12) along with a daytime phone number and any pertinent technical data (such as camera, lens, exposure, film, filters, tripod) to "Your Best Shot," POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY, P.0. Box 1247, Teaneck, NJ 07666.
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0023.xml
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30
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MAMIYA AMERICA CORPORATION: PocketWizard
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MAMIYA AMERICA CORPORATION
PocketWizard
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0024.xml
article
30
30,31
EDITORIAL
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The Word is Convergence
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Jason Schneider
Don’t look now, but you’re probably doing digital photography. According to the best available estimates, if you live in a large city like New York, chances are better than 60/40 that the 4×6 prints you get back from the lab when you bring your film in were printed digitally, after the negatives were scanned.
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0025.xml
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31
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MAMIYA AMERICA CORPORATION: PocketWizard Plus
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MAMIYA AMERICA CORPORATION
PocketWizard Plus
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0026.xml
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32
32
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MAMIYA AMERICA CORPORATION: PocketWizard MultiMAX Transceiver
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MAMIYA AMERICA CORPORATION
PocketWizard MultiMAX Transceiver
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0027.xml
article
32
32,33
CONTACT SHEET
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CONTACT SHEET
Politically incorrect?
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As a longtime subscriber to POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY, I was dismayed by the inexcusably one-sided political commentary in “They Shoot To Save” in (September 2002 issue, page 82). Please cancel my subscription immediately. Don Williams Malibu, CA I loved “They Shoot To Save!” Thanks for finally covering something that is meaningful.
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0028.xml
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Advertisements
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MAMIYA AMERICA CORPORATION
Sekonic L-358
MAMIYA AMERICA CORPORATION
Sekonic L-608
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0029.xml
review
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DIGITAL
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JUST OUT
LATEST DIMAGE ZOOMS FARTHER
minolta
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minolta
Minolta’s new DiMage 7i
$1,100
Looking for a cool new digital camera with a 28-200mm (35mm equivalent) zoom lens? Minolta’s new DiMage 7i ($1,100, street), an upgrade from the Dimage 7, might fit the bill. It features a 5.24 (4.95 effective) MP CCD sensor, shutter speeds of 30-1/4000 sec, and a burstrate of up to seven frames per second in UHS mode (1280×960-pixel SXGA files). In standard mode the DiMAGE 7i captures a respectable two frames per second. Sharpness, color balance, contrast, noise control, and other tonal properties are maintained by Minolta’s Cx Color Imaging technology. The camera also features nine different shooting modes, built-in TTL flash, and hot-shoe for multiple or off-camera flash. Minolta’s DiMage Viewer software is included. Further details can be found at www.minolta.com.
minolta
Cokin UV and Circular Polarizing Digi-Filters
$10
When purchasing a new lens, most serious shooters automatically top them off with a protective shade and filter. Taking this into consideration, Cokin has a line of smalldiameter filters, step-down rings, and lenshoods designed for use with digital cameras that have threaded lenses. The new Cokin UV and Circular Polarizing Digi-Filters are available in 10 sizes ranging from 27mm to 52mm, with street prices from $10 to $25. In order to increase the compatibility of these filters, Cokin has also introduced a series of 15 step-down rings. To help keep glare off the surface of your lens, Cokin offers DigiHoods in five sizes: 27-, 28-, 30-, 30.5-, and 37mm. The metal surfaces on all of Cokin's new lens attachments are finished in a brushed silver color. A complete listing of filter, hood, and ring sizes as well as pricing, can be found at www.cokin.fr.
minolta
Addonics new Mini DigiDrive
$49
Digital cameras, camcorders, and MP3 players aren’t the only electronic doodads getting smaller these days. Addonics new Mini DigiDrive ($49, street) reads electronic data from seven types of media formats. Measuring just 3¼×3࡫×½ inches with a weight of just five ounces, the Mini DigiDrive can transfer data to and from Compacyflash Type I/II, Smart Media, Memory Stick, IBM Microdrive, Multimedia Card, and Secure Digital media cards. The Mini DigiDrive is USB 1.1 or 2.0 compliant and comes with a three-foot USB cable and all necessary software utilities. Like all Addonics DigiDrive’s, the Mini DigiDrive is compatible with Windows 98SE, Me, 2000, XP, Mac OS 8.6 or higher, as well as Linux 2.4 or higher. For product updates and other info, go to www.addonics.com.
minolta
AcidImage 2.0
$19.95
If you still think PDAs are only good for tapping out memos, e-mails, and playing Tetris, here’s something you might want to check out. Red Mercury’s AcidImage 2.0 ($19.95, online) enables you to download and display digital photographs from various memory cards directly onto the LCD screen of any Palm OS handheld (see samples, right). With AcidImage 2.0, your PDA can read BMP, GIF, and JPEG image files without third-party formatting. For quick editing, a fit-toscreen mode offers faster loading times. Other neat tricks performed by AcidImage 2.0 include categorizing and naming your photographs for easier recall at a later time. Selected images can be organized into a slide show with the click of a button. You can download a test-drive of Acid Image 2.0 by www.red-mercury.com.
minolta
eFilm PicturePads
$550
The more you use your digital camera, the more you need a place to store those growing folders of image files. Rather than hauling around a laptop, try slipping one of Delkin’s new eFilm PicturePads ($550 for the 20-gig version) into your jacket pocket or gadget bag. Measuring 57/10×31/5×11/10 inches with a weight of 101/5 ounces, the eFilm PicturePad is a no-brainer solution for picture storage when you are shooting large amounts of images while on vacation or on the run. The PicturePad’s cradle downloads images to your computer and also serves as the battery charger. A 120-240V Universal AC adapter is included. More info can be found at www.Delkin.com.
minolta
PhotoPort TV100
$100
For some of us, even the simplest of digital imaging instructions can put us in a tizzy. The Visioneer PhotoPort TV100 ($100, street) lets you view digital images on TV directly from your CompactFlash Type I/II or Smart Media cards. Aside from inserting your memory card into the reader, all you have to do on the “technical” side is plug the video-in connector cable into the input slot on the back of the TV. Once connected you can run the entire editing process wirelessly from the comfort of your Lazy Boy. The untethered keyboard features function keys that allow you to crop, resize, rotate, and add borders and backgrounds to your pictures with the tap of a key. Captions can be added to the photos by simply typing them out and tapping the “Add Caption” key. You can also create slide shows and record them onto videotape using your VCR. The Visioneer PhotoPort TV100 comes complete with power supplies and all necessary cables. Learn more at www.visioneer.com.
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0030.xml
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Roxio, Inc.: Roxio’s PhotoSuite
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Roxio, Inc.
Roxio’s PhotoSuite
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0031.xml
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36,37
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sony
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sony
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0032.xml
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39
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MAMIYA AMERICA CORPORATION: PRO'S CHOICE.6×7
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MAMIYA AMERICA CORPORATION
PRO'S CHOICE.6×7
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0033.xml
review
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40
JUST OUT
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JUST OUT
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Key Gear Corp.
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Key Gear Corp.
ToolPen
$25
Bet you have at least one pen in your camera bag. Why not make that pen earn its place, by doing double, even triple duty? The ToolPen ($25, street price) is hexagonally-shaped and sized like a typical pencil (55/16 inches long), but has a #2-size flathead screwdriver on one end and a #2 Phillips screwdriver on the other. Now, the magic part: Slide the screwdriver’s pocket clip just so, and out pops a pen point! The ToolPen’s makers claim the retractable will write upside-down, underwater, even at |-30 degrees Fahrenheit. Moreover, it’s said to write on most surfaces (Plastic? Yup. Steel? No prob!), even through grease. Comes with a lifetime warranty, replaceable ink cartridges, and working ends of tempered steel. (Key Gear Corp., 442 Blackbrook Road, Painesville, OH 44077; 866-KEYGEAR; www.toolpen.com)
Key Gear Corp.
Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonar T* 45-90mm f/4.5
$2,900
It’s here! Contax finally has a zoom for its 645 autofocusing system. The Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonar T* 45-90mm f/4.5 has a relatively fast constant aperture, and a dual focusing system that lets users touch up focus manually, even in the autofocus mode. The equivalent of a 28-55mm on a 35mm SLR, the Zeiss 45-90mm ($2,900, street) has a minimum focusing distance of 19.5 inches, is 45/8 inches long, weighs 2 pounds, 7 ounces, accepts 95mm threaded filters, and includes a case. The lens shade? It’s an optional accessory. (Kyocera Electronics/ Contax Cameras, 2301-200 Cottontail Lane, Somerset, NJ 08873; 732-560-0060; www.contaxcameras.com)
Key Gear Corp.
tripod head
$289
Look familiar? RotaCam’s new tripod head for Mamiya’s 645 cameras is almost the spitting image of RotaCam’s flash bracket, also for Mamiya ideal-format cameras. The tripod head ($289, street) works just like the flash bracket: Users can quickly flip the camera for making either verticals or horizontals. Best part: The camera flips on its optical axis—great because it minimizes the need for recomposing after movements. Click-stopped at each end, it flips thanks to a handy-dandy, smooth-sliding cam. The unit weighs 1 pound, 1 ounce, and while it won’t pan or tilt, it accepts a quick release plate for easy mounting on a conventional pan/tilt or ball head. (Mamiya America; 8 Westchester Plaza, Elmsford, NY; 10523; 914-347-3300; www.mamiya.com)
Key Gear Corp.
Portra 400 NC
The knock against color-negative portrait films? To minimize blemishes and pull maximum detail from high-contrast scenes (think black tux/white gown), these films are typically low-contrast with somewhat lackluster color. We’ve found Kodak’s Portra 400 NC (Normal Color), for example, delivers heavenly skin tones, (yes, we’ve tried it) but the overall color palette is, well, normal. Want a more vibrant look? Kodak offers the “high color pop” (cool phrase, no?) of its new Portra 400 UC (Ultra Color). Even more than Portra 400 VC (Vivid Color), the new Ultra Color delivers saturated hues that zoom past vibrant in the direction of explosive. But get this: Skin tones are claimed to be a virtual match for those of Portra 400 NC. No mean feat! (www.kodak.com).
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0034.xml
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41
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Samsung
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Samsung
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0035.xml
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42
42
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HOYA
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HOYA
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0036.xml
article
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43,44
DISCOVERY
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Hey TAXI!
Want to become an invisible photographer? Drive a cab!
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Peter Kolonia
Veteran N.Y.C. cabby/photographer Matt Weber never knew he was invisible until he pulled out his camera in some of the city’s grittier neighborhoods. Shooting with his Canon A-1 (and later an F-1), Weber expected nasty confrontations as he cruised the ‘hood’s “off limits to photographers” back streets.
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0037.xml
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45
45
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Fuji Photo Film U.S.A., Inc.: FinePix S602 Zoom Digital Camera
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Fuji Photo Film U.S.A., Inc.
FinePix S602 Zoom Digital Camera
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0038.xml
article
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46,48
COLOR
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Superspeed SHOOTOUT
We pit Konica’s Centuria Super 1600 against Fujifilm’s Superia 1600 for bragging rights among amateur high speed print films.
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PETER KOLONIA
Excitedly we de-boxed a brick of Konica’s new ISO 1600 print film, Centuria Super 1600. Konica, after all, pioneered the field of high-speed color negative films, offering an ISO 3200 Speedy Gonzalez in the mid-1980s at a time when 800s and 1600s were few and far between.
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0039.xml
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47
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Wacom Technology Corporation: Intuos2
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Wacom Technology Corporation
Intuos2
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0040.xml
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49
49
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Memorex Products, Inc.: DVD+RW/+R
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Memorex Products, Inc.
DVD+RW/+R
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0041.xml
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50
50
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cokin: cokin filters
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cokin
cokin filters
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0042.xml
article
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51,52
POINT & SHOOT
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SAUCY PREGO
It’s in there...well, most of it.
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We were fresh from our sighting of an ivory-billed woodpecker (in, of all places, Staten Island, New York) when we turned our attention to another rare bird—a precision single-focal-length point-and-shoot. This recently discovered species, called the Rollei Prego 30, shows all the characteristics of this noble genus: compact size, handsome looks (and real aluminum, not a skillful impersonation), decent lens speed (f/3.5), sharp imaging.
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0043.xml
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52
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Advertisements
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M ROCK
BAGS
M ROCK
BACK-PACKS
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0044.xml
article
53
53,54,55
OVERHEARD ON POPPHOTO.COM
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OVERHEARD ON POPPHOTO.COM
Goofy categories and hoaxes
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Mason Resnick
Our Snapshot Cafe readers are getting punchy. It must be the late hours when many of them post. Threads like “What vehicle do you transport your photo gear in?” (105 posts), “What Spatula do you flip your pancakes with???” (46 posts), and other spoofs on “What camera/lens/film, etc. do you use?” have proliferated the Snapshot Cafe.
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0045.xml
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53
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Digipower: Digipower DPS-9000
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Digipower
Digipower DPS-9000
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0046.xml
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54
54
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Epson America, Inc.
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Epson America, Inc.
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0047.xml
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55
55
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Tamrac, Inc.: Digital Series Camera Bags
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Tamrac, Inc.
Digital Series Camera Bags
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0048.xml
article
56
56,58
DIGITAL DIRECTIONS
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Pick a card, any card
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Michael J. McNamara
Not too long ago, there was a plethora of film sizes (e.g., 127, 828, 620, 116, 122, etc.) but today (barring sheetfilm) the popular choice is down to 35mm, APS, and 120/220 rollfilm. Eventually there will doubtless be a similar shake-out and rationalization among digital memory cards.
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0049.xml
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57
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Advertisements
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SIGMA CORPORATION OF AMERICA
SIGMA SA-7
SIGMA CORPORATION OF AMERICA
SA-9
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0050.xml
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59
59
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SIGMA CORPORATION OF AMERICA: SIGMA 15-30mm F3.5-4.5 EX DG ASPHERICAL
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SIGMA CORPORATION OF AMERICA
SIGMA 15-30mm F3.5-4.5 EX DG ASPHERICAL
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0051.xml
article
60
60,62,64
SLR
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Rebel Rouser
Canon EOS Rebel Ti: sexy new styling plus upgraded features
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HERBERT KEPPLER
"While 35mm SLRs may be slowly declining—probably due to increasing digital camera incursions—the number of actual 35mm SLR purchases remains very high and we intend to continue leading the pack.” So the he So spoke the Canon executive as he handed me an early production sample oof what we had been expecting for a year, the successor to the Canon EOS Rebel 2000, namely the Rebel Ti, which Canon has labeled the “new-generation, world standard camera designed to fend off rival models.”
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0052.xml
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61
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SIGMA CORPORATION OF AMERICA: Sigma Super Telephoto Lenses
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SIGMA CORPORATION OF AMERICA
Sigma Super Telephoto Lenses
[no value]
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0053.xml
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63
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Advertisements
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SIGMA CORPORATION OF AMERICA
20mm F1.8 EX DG ASPHERICAL RF
SIGMA CORPORATION OF AMERICA
24mm F1.8 EX DG ASPHERICAL MACRO
[no value]
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0054.xml
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65
65
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Tamron USA, lnc.: XR glass
[no value]
Tamron USA, lnc.
XR glass
[no value]
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0055.xml
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66
66
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Rhinotek: RHINOTEK INK
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Rhinotek
RHINOTEK INK
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0056.xml
article
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67,68
CAMERA COLLECTOR
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Beijing Bonbons
Did they spark the rangefinder revolution?
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JASON SCHNEIDER
What’s in the candy sampler box? Alas, no liquid centers, but something infinitely tastier to classic rangefinder fanciers— the delectable burgundy leather-covered, Leica-inspired bonbon shown below. Made in China by the Phenix (the spelling is correct) Camera Company, the JG 50 is red for a reason—it’s a limited edition presentation camera made to commemorate the 50th anniversary of communism in the People’s Republic of China.
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Advertisements
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THK Photo Products, Inc.
SLIK tripods
THK Photo Products, Inc.
monopods
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0058.xml
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Tokina
AF17mm f/3.5
Tokina
AF20-35mm f/2.8
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Advertisement: Popular Photography
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Popular Photography
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71,72,74
DIGITAL TOOLBOX
[no value]
Get the red out!
Three ways to make that cursed ruby glow go
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Megan Dey
We all know about redeye—that unfortunate and all-too-common result of using a film or digital camera with a flash too close to the lens when the ambient light is too dark and your subject’s eyes are too light. There are three ways to possibly correct this problem if you can’t move the flash sufficiently away from the lens: Use your camera’s pre-flash red-eye reduction feature on your camera (which often doesn’t work, or causes your subjects to shut their eyes), a redeye pen (requires a steady hand and good aim) and...with your computer, you can use image-editing software.
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new york institute of photography
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new york institute of photography
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ADORAMA INC.
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ADORAMA INC.
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FILM
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DRAT! MORE DIGITAL NONSENSE!
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H.K.
Photoshop tricks? Cloning hocus-pocus? Some other “cheating computer manipulation” that many conservative photographers claim are unacceptable and obnoxious when “passed off" as photography? None of it! Tony Gezirjian, founder and former president of the Westchester Photographic Society, loves to play with images using all the pre-computer tricks of the trade, including hand-retouching.
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ADORAMA INC.
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ADORAMA INC.
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Schneider Optics, Inc.: B+W filters
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Schneider Optics, Inc.
B+W filters
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HELP!
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HELP!
Saving Private Tintype
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I discovered an old tintype photo that has turned almost completely black. Is there any way to lighten it? The picture is of a Civil War soldier, but it’s so dark I can’t tell if he was in the Union or Confederate army! Bonnie Geschke Bellingham, WA If you’re sure your picture is a tintype, we suggest washing it in a mild soap solution, such as Ivory flakes.
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PrimeFilm 1800s
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PrimeFilm 1800U
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FILM
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Itsa Gift!
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C. Crane Company Inc.
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C. Crane Company Inc.
Photon Micro-Light II ultraminiature flashlight
$19.95
Don’t keep your friends in the dark: if they can’t see the settings on their cameras, are tired of tripping over chairs and boxes in the dark, and don’t want to flounder anymore searching for those illusive thingamabobs hidden at the bottom of the inky blackness of their camera bags, have I got something for them. The incredibly bright Photon Micro-Light II ultraminiature flashlight uses a single white LED, runs full-blast for five hours on two replaceable lithium batteries and travels on my keychain at all times. This 1×2×0.375-inch marvel is $19.95, including ground shipping from C. Crane Company Inc., 800-522-8863, or www.ccrane.com. Buy three and they’re $16.95 apiece, one for you to keep and two to give to friends who will bless you.—H.K.
C. Crane Company Inc.
film leader retriever
$15
Dammit, You rewound the film end back into the cartridge: Breathes there a 35mm photographer who hasn’t accidentally rewound the leader into the cartridge? This probably most often occurs when you’re attempting to rewind a half-shot roll back into the cartridge to replace one film with another kind, but plan on finishing the first film later. You can become exasperated trying to fish the leader out of the cartridge with cellophane tape (usually in vain). A film leader retriever does it nicely. But don’t buy the tiny, difficult-to-operate $5 retriever or your gift recipient is liable to throw it back at you. Instead, purchase the Hama Film Leader Retriever (about $15), available in most camera stores. It, too, takes patience, but it does work. —H.K.
C. Crane Company Inc.
Stuffbak Lost and Found labels
$10
Get lost StuffBak: Bestow on your friends peace of mind with Stuffbak Lost and Found labels (under $10 at www.stuffbak.com). Should they leave their camera on a train or plane, Stuffbak’s hefty adhesive labels can help them get it back. The labels attach to gear and proclaim in hard-to-miss type: Reward for Return! The Good Samaritan who finds your gear, calls the printed 800 number, and Stuffbak takes care of the rest. According to Stuffbak, the system has worked for over 90 percent of the items reported lost. —P.K.
C. Crane Company Inc.
Morris Zip-Flap Original Shooting Mitt
$15
Flapper-era mitts: These guys have been around since the ’50s, when a gent named Morris Slimovitz created the Morris Zip-Flap Original Shooting Mitt (made by Boss) to keep his fellow Tennessee sportsmen’s fingers from freezing while stalking their prey. The challenge was to both keep their trigger fingers warm and available for use. Morris’s solution? A peek-a-boo flap for fingers! I prefer hunting my subjects with a camera, not a gun, and these gloves keep my chilly fingers nice and toasty. The camouflaged, woolshelled, fleece-lined mittens have airtight, Velcro flaps. Unsealed, they offer finger access to your camera. Fasten the flap to protect fingers between shots. $15 at Porter’s (www.porters.com: 800-553-2001), and in outdoor-supply shops. —M.R.
C. Crane Company Inc.
Hakuba Storage Cases
$7
Hakuba Storage Cases for Digital Media ($7 and up) What does almost every digital camera owner really crave that costs just a few bucks? A small, convenient memory card carrier, of course! After all, they likely have more than one digital media card and need somewhere to keep them from getting lost or damaged. Hakuba’s cases range in size, capacity, and material. My favorite? Keychain card holders. They’re small enough to carry with you at all times. Using more than one format? Just switch the plastic inserts to the cards you’ll be carrying. If you need more protection, Hakuba also offers metal cases that are about the same size as a man’s wallet, www.hakubausa.com. —M.D.
C. Crane Company Inc.
Kodak Pocket Photoguide
Book ’em: I love books, but if I see one more photo book like The Horseshoe Crab Photos of Ignatz Q. Schmertz, I may whack somebody with a coffee table. Instead of another big, glossy photo book, why not buy your beloved shutterbug The Kodak Pocket Photoguide, 4th Edition, $14.95 (www.silverpixelpress.com). Now in its umpty-umpteenth year, this weather-resistant litde book has just the facts, Ma’am: exposure info, filter guides, film specs, all that stuff. And if, like me, you love a good calculator dial, the Photoguide has a enough of them to keep a simple mind like mine occupied for a boring bus ride. At 3¾×5 inches, it honest-to-God fitzinna pocket. —D.R.
C. Crane Company Inc.
Ultrapod II
$21.50
Lowdown on low pod: With all due respect to our Mr. K’s enviable collection of flimsy full-height tripods, I think the best camera support for small point-and-shoots (film or digital) is short and sweet (and non-shaky)...Like the Ultrapod II, which weighs under half a pound, gets the camera to a blistering (but steady!) 6½ inches high, and has a quick ballhead that locks down tight with a big knob. A Velcro strap lets you use it like a hand grip, or lash it to a tree branch or fencepost or whatever the heck. Use it on a table or other horizontal support, or brace it against a door frame to steady a vertical shot. Best of all, it fits in a small bag or large pocket, so you’re actually likely to take it along. Porter’s (www.porters.com) has them for $21.50. Don’t get the smaller Ultrapod I—that one’s too dang small! —D.R.
C. Crane Company Inc.
Monomatic-Stativ monopods
$182.50
Steady a camera with a gift that's my fault: When Linhof announced that no more Monomatic-Stativ monopods would be made, most knowledgeable photographers probably felt that such a high-priced ($182.50) caseless item deserved to bite the dust, no matter how cleverly the 11-ounce, 14-inch rod-like device extended automatically from 25 inches to 58 inches. I had mine and one was enough for me. But Adorama, one of the last stores to sell the monopods, figured that if I liked the Linhof so much, perhaps they should try to duplicate it. To make a long story short, involving my examining many and always improving engineering samples, Adorama came up with a replica Linhof, which they called a Podmatic. It's virtually impossible to tell the Podmatic from the Linhof-except that the Adorama ver sion at $90 with a case is better. —H.K.
C. Crane Company Inc.
Olympus Stylus Epic
$100
Best bang (well, click) fer the buck: I started calling the Olympus Stylus Epic "the best $100 camera in the known universe" a while ago, but you know what? I'm wrong. Because you can now buy one of these, in basic black, U.S. warranty, in a reputable store, for 80 bucks. For that, you don't get a zoom lens, but as we used to say in convent school, BFD. You do get a fast (f/2.8!), SLR-sharp 35mm lens that covers most point-and-shoot situations. So load up with fast colorprint film and shoot available light portraits by the fireside. It fits in the pocket of any shirt you own. By the way, the "champagne" DLX model pictured (with date/time back, everybody's favorite annoyance) will cost you $90, so don't sue us. —D.R.
C. Crane Company Inc.
Nexia Q1 APS camera
$40
Way cool for school! Got a teenage daughter you'd like to introduce to photography? Fuji's Nexia Q1 APS camera is the ticket. With a unique circular shape, compact proportions, and in four shimmering metallic high-fashion hues (pink, light purple, royal blue, and light blue), the Q1 is as cute as it is affordable ($40). Worn from its supplied neckstrap, where it beckons like a piece of coloful eye-candy, the fully automated, flash-equipped Q1 will make your daughter the envy of her friends. —P.K.
C. Crane Company Inc.
Legion Professional Digital Art Papers
$40
For the (ink) jet set: Is there an inkjet user in your life? Pamper him or her with a fine art inkjet paper. Among my favorites are the Legion Professional Digital Art Papers distributed by Bogen Photo. The lustrous Photo Silk surface ($40 for 50 8½×11 sheets), for example, must be seen—and touched—to be believed. Brilliantly white in appearance, its surface is matte, with a palpable tooth similar to Kodak's famous E-surface of old. "Fuzzy" is the only way to describe it. (Don't be misled: Photo Silk is paper, not cloth.) —P.K
C. Crane Company Inc.
Adobe's Photoshop Elements 2.0
$99
Photoshop Elements 2.0 ($99, street) Adobe's Photoshop Elements 2.0 offers a lot of the latest and greatest tricks found in the more expensive Photoshop 7.0. Some of the coolest features included are Print package for printing multiple images on a page, web page creation from a folder of images on your hard drive, and the gel look that's all the rage right now. www.adobe.com. —M.D
C. Crane Company Inc.
Olympus Stylus Epic
$90
Best bang (well, click) fer the buck: I started calling the Olympus Stylus Epic “the best $100 camera in the known universe” a while ago, but you know what? I’m wrong. Because you can now buy one of these, in basic black, U.S. warranty, in a reputable store, for 80 bucks. For that, you don’t get a zoom lens, but as we used to say in convent school, BFD. You do get a fast (f/2.8!), SLR-sharp 35mm lens that covers most point-and-shoot situations. So load up with fast color-print film and shoot available-light portraits by the fireside. It fits in the pocket of any shirt you own. By the way, the “champagne” DLX model pictured (with date/time back, everybody’s favorite annoyance) will cost you $90, so don't sue us. —D.R.
C. Crane Company Inc.
MAXi 343E
$125
Coming! A chance to do the Velbon Ultra-Maxi twist: At last, after crying in the tripod wilderness for a travel tripod under 2 pounds, less than 20 inches folded, but extending beyond 5 feet, my sobs were heard by Velbon’s president, Ken Nakitani, who did what was said to be impossible: He made such a tripod, the MAXi 343E. My yearning must have been right on the mark: In the past two years, this tripod (left) has been a great seller worldwide. Coming is the Ultra Maxi, further shrunk when folded to 35½ inches, weighing 31½ ounces but extending to 62¾A inches with a new two-way vertical head. No leg locks! Just twist legs and they lock themselves (far left). If not yet in the stores, give your gift recipient a promissory note. Price not settled yet, but figure on around $125. —H.K.
C. Crane Company Inc.
Dazzle DVD Creation Station 200
$229
Dazzle DVD Creation Station 200 ($229, street) Want to create the ultimate DV slide show or edit your videos? The DCS 200 takes any input—camcorder, video, broadcast TV, and digital stills from most memory cards— and lets you put it all together on your PC. The creation station connects to any PC via USB and converts all your files to MPEG-2 as it is being saved to the hard drive so there’s no need to convert later on. You can edit your video with Dazzle MovieStar 5, and once your project is complete you can save it to CD, DVD, videotape, or even post for webcast, www.dazzle.com. —M.D.
C. Crane Company Inc.
Sony 1.3MP Cybershot U
$129
Sony 1.3MP Cybershot U ($129 street) The cutest, most portable digital camera I’ve seen yet! The Cybershot U by Sony is a 1.3-megapixel camera that will be a hit with softball moms and teens. It’s small enough (3⅜×1⅜×1⅝ inches) to fit in your pants pocket, it delivers 4×6-inch prints, and it has a a cool iridescent finish. It’s surprisingly packed with features, but might actually be too small for big-handed users. www.sony.com. —M.D.
C. Crane Company Inc.
HP Photosmart
$180
HP Photosmart 100 Printer ($180, street) A nice little 4×6-inch inkjet printer that’s ready to travel at the fold of its lid. It will deliver a print in about two minutes, and can print directly from CompactFlash, Smart Media, and Memory Stick. The printer also doubles as a card reader for your computer, and could be an ideal companion for someone with a 1.3-MP digital camera. www.hp.com. —M.D.
C. Crane Company Inc.
Voigtländer Ultra Wide-Heliar
$700
Open wide and watch the birdie: I don’t really know if anyone has ever tried using the 12mm f/5.6 Voigtländer Ultra Wide-Heliar to shoot a distorted bird at 12 inches with a covering angle of 121 degrees, but the person receiving this widest-angle-ever 35mm camera lens in Leica screw mount (a $700 gift) can have a go at it and cover more ground than possible with any other lens. He or she has no Leica? Be a sport and throw in a Voigtländer Bessa manual-focusing body for another $160. The combo is still cheaper than almost any 14mm lens without a camera—a unique bargain and a great picture-taker. —H.K.
C. Crane Company Inc.
Gitzo’s 1227 Mountaineer
$440
Dunno what to give? Here’s a sure thing! Treat your photo friends to heaven on three legs: featherweight, carbon-fiber tripod. With gams of sturdy, space-age spun fiber, these beauties are easy to carry...if not afford. A personal favorite? Gitzo’s 1227 Mountaineer. Streeting for under $440, it’s a straightforward workhorse, with a rapid action center column and compact folded height, that tips the scales at a feathery 3 lbs, 3 oz! —P.K.
C. Crane Company Inc.
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$400
Give the gift of sharpness: If there’s a Nikon or Canon shooter on your list, get ’em an Image Stabilized (Canon) or Vibration Reduction (Nikon) lens. These optics help produce sharper pix by automatically compensating for camera shake. Canon’s range from $400 to over $8000, and include a 28-135mm, 70-200mm (an f/2.8!), 75-300mm, l00—400mm, among others. Nikon shooters have only one VR option, but it’s a doozy: the 80—100mm ($1,200 street) —P.K.
C. Crane Company Inc.
silk-lined wooden gift box
$400
For the photographer who has everything: Clueless about what to get a photo enthusiast who seems to have it all? How about a working, handsomely detailed miniature version of their favorite classic camera? Minox, maker of 8×11mm-format spy cameras, produces more than half a dozen mini-me collectibles in the form of the Hasselblad SWC, Contax I, Leica M3, Rollei 2.8 F, Nikon F, and others. Each is sold in a lavish, silk-lined wooden gift box and costs about $400. —P.K.
C. Crane Company Inc.
Wacom 6×8-inch tablet
$349
Wacom 6×8-inch tablet ($349 street) More natural feeling than a mouse and 256 levels of pressure more precise, Wacom tablets (mouse pads with an electronic pen that “writes” on the pad to move the cursor) are great for anyone who wants to have ultimate control over the fine details of their original images. In use, it feels much like writing or drawing on paper, and when used in tandem with the right software tools, can let you draw, sketch or even paint with real-world accuracy. The 6×8-inch tablet should handle most of your needs, although pricier ones for the pro market go as large as 12×12 inches, www.wacom.com. —M.D.
C. Crane Company Inc.
Wacom 6½8-inch tablet
$349
Wacom 6½8-inch tablet ($349 street) More natural feeling than a mouse and 256 levels of pressure more precise, Wacom tablets (mouse pads with an electronic pen that “writes” on the pad to move the cursor) are great for anyone who wants to have ultimate control over the fine details of their original images. In use, it feels much like writing or drawing on paper, and when used in tandem with the right software tools, can let you draw, sketch or even paint with real-world accuracy. The 6½8-inch tablet should handle most of your needs, although pricier ones for the pro market go as large as 12½12 inches, www.wacom.com. —M.D.
C. Crane Company Inc.
Contax T3
$700
Brad and Muffy go point-and-shooting: Best camera for $500-$750? I’ve always said it’s a mid-level SLR with a wide-totele zoom. (Then again, I’m the same boring person who tells you to buy the 4-door sedan with the manual tranny.) If you don’t want to lug an SLR, but want a sharp-shooting camera that isn’t, well, a hunk o’ plastic, here are the two sharpest “point-and-shoots” we’ve yet tested: the Contax T3 ($700 silver, $750, black), and the Rollei AFM35 ($500). The titanium T3 offers more control and (literally) bulletproof construction; the simpler-to-use Rollei has the more classic looks and ergonomic handling. Come to think of it, that roadster is cute, too. . . —D.R.
C. Crane Company Inc.
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C. Crane Company Inc.
Dimage X
$350
Love at first byte: I’m writing a memo to a Minolta U.S.A. executive with a long last name: Dear Jon: The Dimage X is just too cool. A poem in pixels. An ode in optics. A sonnet in silver. There is, unfortunately, one thing wrong with it. Now, don’t get me wrong, I understand you can turn off the little tunes that the camera plays to accompany setting changes. But really, maybe it should play something, you know, more in keeping with the gestalt of the Dimage X. Maybe something in a soft samba beat. In the hush of night... exactly like a bittersweet refrain...comes that certain smile...to haunt your heart away. It should play Astrud Gilberto. Do that, Jon, and the camera will be perfect. P.S. We’ve found out this thing takes real good pictures! And by the way, how did you guys get the lens to zoom without it poking outta the camera? The Dimage X, about $350 at your photo dealer. —D.R.
C. Crane Company Inc.
Apple G4 Tower
$1,700-5,000
Apple G4 Tower ($1,700-5,000, street) Faster and cheaper than previous G4s, these latest incarnations of Mac’s top-line desktop computers are out to impress. Sure, clock time might not rival PCs, but the super-efficient, UNIX-based OS 10.2 “Jaguar” more than compensates. With dual G4 processors, expandability to four hard drives, two optical drives and plenty of photo-friendly add-ons, these computers provide the kind of maximum speed and performance that resourcehungry image applications and big image files require. And they look cool, too. www.apple.com. —M.D.
C. Crane Company Inc.
The new Novatron 61-V600-3FC
$1,695
Real lights for real photographers: I’ve always been impressed by my colleague Pete Kolonia’s Novatron portable studio flash kit, and even more impressed that Pete’s been using his professionally for over 10 years without a problem. For someone who’s getting serious about portraits or tabletop work, nothing beats this kind of setup. The new Novatron 61-V600-3FC Convertible Kit (www.novatron.com), a nifty intermediatelevel setup, has pro-level features like variable power output, fan-cooled heads, and quartz halogen modeling lights. Three heads, three stands, three reflectors, two umbrellas, power pack, sync cord and AC cord all pack up into a compact padded case. $1,695, and we think it's bloody well worth it. —D.R.
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Why is this Gift Guide different from all other Gift Guides? Because each of the 27 items described herein has been carefully chosen by a POP PHOTO editor who has actually used it, and is enthusiastic about it to the point of including it on his or her personal holiday gift (or wish) list.
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DIGITAL
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Turner turns to DIGITAL
ONE OF PHOTOGRAPHY’S GREATEST COLOR MASTERS ADDS DIGITAL TO HIS EYE-POPPING BAG O’ TRICKS
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Dan Richards
To all those people who put wet towels on their heads and run around screaming “It’s the end of the world!” whenever a Famous Photographer starts shooting digital, you really, really aren’t going to like this one. Pete Turner is shooting digital, and loving it.
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92,93,94,95,144,184,186
DIGITAL
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FUJIFILM S2 PRO
Does FUJI's latest digital SLR leave the others in the dust?
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When major camera manufacturers compete with each other for dominance in a specific category, photographers can’t help but benefit from the increased features and innovations included in each new camera model. If it wasn’t for this healthy competition, there might not be a Nikon F5 or Canon EOS-3, and we’d be stuck with handheld exposure meters and manually focused lenses.
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LENS TESTS
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Canon
Yes indeed, Canon does have a 28-200mm zoom
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Hands on: Fairly massive, solid, weighty, satin-black-finished lens with easy-to-grasp, overly large rubberized zoom ring collar. Narrow but conveniently placed and easy-to-turn manual-focusing ring. Large, highly readable silver-colored zoom focal-length numerals are the only numerals on barrel—there are no distance or magnification ratio scales.
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98,99
LENS TESTS
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Sigma
Wide, wider, widest: Superspeed Sigma trio
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Hands on: We've seen a number of 28mm f/1.8 AF lenses before, but 24mm f/1.8s are rather thin on the infield ground, and a 20mm f/1.8 is like a line drive right out of the park! All three lenses are fairly large and heavy for their respective focal lengths primarily due to their large apertures, and, like other Sigma EX-series lenses aimed at pros, they're beautifully finished in an attractive matte black with tiny gold metallic flecks.
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0074.xml
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99
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Gray Market
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Gray Market
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100,101
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PHOTO SHOPPING center
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102
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POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY
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POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0077.xml
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ADORAMA INC
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ADORAMA INC
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PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0078.xml
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104,105
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B&H PHOTO - VIDEO - PRO AUDIO
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B&H PHOTO - VIDEO - PRO AUDIO
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106,107
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ABE'S CAMERAS AND ELECTRONICS OF MAINE
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ABE'S CAMERAS AND ELECTRONICS OF MAINE
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17photo
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17photo
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109,110,111
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Samy's Camera
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Samy's Camera
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112,113,114,115
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UNIQUEPHOTO
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UNIQUEPHOTO
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116
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East Coast Photo
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East Coast Photo
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0084.xml
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117
117
[no value]
[no value]
BEACH CAMERA
[no value]
BEACH CAMERA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0085.xml
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118
118,119
[no value]
[no value]
focuscamera
[no value]
focuscamera
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0086.xml
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120
120
[no value]
[no value]
Family Photo & Video
[no value]
Family Photo & Video
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0087.xml
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121
121
[no value]
[no value]
Foto Connection
[no value]
Foto Connection
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0088.xml
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122
122,123,124,125
[no value]
[no value]
ONE CALL
[no value]
ONE CALL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0089.xml
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126
126
[no value]
[no value]
BIG APPLE PHOTO
[no value]
BIG APPLE PHOTO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0090.xml
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127
127
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
Nikon Inc.
Nikon D100
Nikon Inc.
Nikon D1X
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0091.xml
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128
128
[no value]
[no value]
Royal Camera & Video Inc.
[no value]
Royal Camera & Video Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0092.xml
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129
129
[no value]
[no value]
A&M Photo World
[no value]
A&M Photo World
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0093.xml
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130
130,131
[no value]
[no value]
BROADWAY PHOTO
[no value]
BROADWAY PHOTO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0094.xml
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132
132,133,134,135
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0095.xml
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136
136
[no value]
[no value]
MARINE PARK cameras & electronics
[no value]
MARINE PARK cameras & electronics
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0096.xml
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137
137,138,139,140,141
[no value]
[no value]
Tristate Camera & Video
[no value]
Tristate Camera & Video
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0097.xml
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142
142,143
[no value]
[no value]
CCI CAMERA CITY Inc.
[no value]
CCI CAMERA CITY Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0098.xml
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145
145
[no value]
[no value]
DIGITALFOTOCLUB
[no value]
DIGITALFOTOCLUB
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0099.xml
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146
146,147,148,149
[no value]
[no value]
SMILE PHOTO
[no value]
SMILE PHOTO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0100.xml
article
150
150
TIME EXPOSURE
How we looked and what we wrote back then.
50 years ago
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The charming portrait of a young reader on our November ’52 cover was taken by Tana Hoban. She used a 3¼×4¼ Graflex with f/2.5 Cooke lens, metered with a Norwood Director and exposed Kodachrome Daylight Type for 1/10 sec at f/2.5. Featured in this issue:
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0101.xml
article
150
150
TIME EXPOSURE
How we looked and what we wrote back then.
25 years ago
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The dream-like abstract image of a horse in the surf on our November ’77 cover is by London-based photographer John Claridge, who double-exposed Kodachrome 64 in a Nikon F2 with 80-200mm Nikkor zoom lens. Featured in this issue: Nikon FM lab report, first autofocus 35 (Konica C35AF), shooting in the rain, Lewis W. Hine.
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0102.xml
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151
151,152,153,154,155,156,157,158,159,160,161,162,163,164,165,166,167,168,169,170,171,172,173,174,175,176,177,178,179,180,181
[no value]
[no value]
B&H PHOTO - VIDEO - PRO AUDIO
[no value]
B&H PHOTO - VIDEO - PRO AUDIO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0103.xml
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182
182,183,184
[no value]
[no value]
ADORAMA INC
[no value]
ADORAMA INC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0104.xml
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185
185,186
[no value]
[no value]
ADORAMA INC
[no value]
ADORAMA INC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0105.xml
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187
187,188
[no value]
[no value]
ADORAMA INC
[no value]
ADORAMA INC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0106.xml
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189
189,190,191,192,193,194,195,196,197,198
[no value]
[no value]
ADORAMA INC
[no value]
ADORAMA INC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0107.xml
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198
198
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0108.xml
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199
199
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0109.xml
article
200
200
FINAL FRAME
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HIDDEN HANDS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Mason Resnick
Is someone missing here? According to Jewish mystical writings, there are 36 hidden individuals—called “Lamed-Vavniks”—who have the potential to heal the world in times of great danger. Photographer Todd Weinstein thinks he may have found one of them, at least symbolically, in this picture.
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0110.xml
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201
201
[no value]
[no value]
Lowepro: protective cases
[no value]
Lowepro
protective cases
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0111.xml
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202
202
[no value]
[no value]
Bogen Photo Corp.: Digi 719B Tripod - Light
[no value]
Bogen Photo Corp.
Digi 719B Tripod - Light
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_20021101_0066_011_0112.xml