Issue: 19950801

Tuesday, August 1, 1995
August
8
True
59
Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Articles
cover
0_1
0_1
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0001.xml
advertisement
0_2
0_2,1
[no value]
[no value]
MINOLTA
[no value]
MINOLTA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0002.xml
advertisement
2
2
[no value]
[no value]
Division of Kyocera Electronics Inc.
[no value]
Division of Kyocera Electronics Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0003.xml
tableOfContents
3
3
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0004.xml
advertisement
4
4,5,7
[no value]
[no value]
SIGMA
[no value]
SIGMA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0005.xml
advertisement
6
6
[no value]
[no value]
SUNPAK
[no value]
SUNPAK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0006.xml
masthead
6
6
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0007.xml
article
8
8
Snap Shots
[no value]
The little paper company that could
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Old enlarging papers never die, they just fade away—except those that wind up in the Luminos catalog. Ivory-toned emulsions, charcoal papers, textured surfaces, unsupercoated emulsions for hand-tinting and Bromoil printing—if you’re looking for an out-of-production b&w enlarging paper, skip Kodak, Agfa, and Ilford and head for little-known Luminos (800/431-1859).
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0008.xml
article
8
8
Snap Shots
[no value]
P/S bites the dust—and lives
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Another post in the (seemingly) neverending saga of cameras that take a rapping but keep on snapping comes from Jim Martin, a Dallas-based pro photographer. Martin was shooting a sunrise on the west face of the Grand Canyon last fall and dropped a roll of exposed film over the edge of the canyon.
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0009.xml
article
9
9
Snap Shots
[no value]
History AND humor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The American Photographic Historical Society might sound like a stuffed-shirt kinda crew, but this 25-yearold gang dedicated to “preserving the heritage of photography,” knows how to have fun, too. Honor & Humor, for example, is a 44-page booklet the Society co-published that’s packed with cartoons collected from publications of the New York Press Photographers Association.
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0010.xml
article
9
9
Snap Shots
[no value]
NAFTA fallout?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Do they still make 126 cartridges to fit your old Kodak Instamatic cameras, et al? You betcha, witness this colorful box of Kodacolor Gold 200. But there’s something funny about it. Turn the box over, read the bottom, and you’ll find that it’s Made In Mexico by IFISA (A Kodak Company).
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0011.xml
article
9
9
Snap Shots
[no value]
Bomb plot a frame up
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
When the film Dr. Strangelove, or How 1 Iearned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomd) was re-released for its 30th anniversary in late 1994, the media were told that director Stanley Kubrick (a former photographer for Look magazine) had used a Nikon camera to personally restore the black-and-white film frame by frame.
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0012.xml
article
10
10,11
Your Best Shot
[no value]
Your Best Shot
Is there a winning formula? Try one part animated subject, one part determination, and a keen sense of timing.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“Your Best Shot” Entry Rules: You may send up to 20 of your best shots (transparencies or prints no larger than 8x12) along with a daytime phone number and any pertinent technical data (such as camera, lens, exposure, film, filters, tripod) to “Your Best Shot,” POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY, P.0. BOX 1247, Teaneck, NJ 07666.
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0013.xml
article
12
12
Time Exposure
[no value]
Time Exposure
50 years ago
How we looked and what we wrote back then.
25 years ago
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Large format studio shots were then de rigueur, so there were lots in our August '45 issue, including Zia Kadri’s plucky cover image of a harpist, taken with a 4x5 Korona View on Kodachrome. Inside, a feature on color pioneer Paul Hesse, another view camera master, described him as “the highest paid color photographer in the world” (see one of his color portraits, upper right).
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0014.xml
advertisement
12A
12A,12B,12C,15D,12E,12F,12G,12H
[no value]
[no value]
NIKON
[no value]
NIKON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0015.xml
article
13
13,14,16,18
SLR
[no value]
SLR
ISO 800 and 1000 print films for general SLR use? Has Keppler gone utterly mad?
[no value]
[no value]
Herbert Keppler
What ISO speed film do I recommend for general use? ISO 400 of course. Unless you’re expecting to make murals the size of a barn, today’s ISO 400 print films will do nicely, thank you, up to l 1x14 and beyond. And I’ve got the 14x17-inch prints from ISO 400 to prove it.
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0016.xml
advertisement
15
15
[no value]
[no value]
Adobe Systems Incorporated.
[no value]
Adobe Systems Incorporated.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0017.xml
advertisement
17
17
[no value]
[no value]
Canon
[no value]
Canon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0018.xml
advertisement
18
18
[no value]
[no value]
Nikon
[no value]
Nikon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0019.xml
article
19
19,26,30,68,69,170
Letters
[no value]
Letters
Undervalued 110's
Manual shift
Up in the air
Solar fungicide
Slide into P/S
Good buy, good-bye
Decisions, decisions
Cover story
Getting warm on cool
No one meter v/inner
Crying wolf
N70 vs. N8008S
Put on the spot
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
I recently bought a Minolta Pocket Pak 440E for $20, and my feeling is that 110 format cameras may be somewhat undervalued. John Bateson Glenford, OH They are undervalued in terms of their intrinsic worth, but the only collectible ones likely to increase in value are topof-the-line, technically interesting models by major makers.
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0020.xml
advertisement
19
19
[no value]
[no value]
ZERO HALLIBURTON
[no value]
ZERO HALLIBURTON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0021.xml
article
20
20,21,22
POINT & SHOOT
[no value]
A Klutch of Kool Konicas
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dan Richards
Tired of predictable point-andshoot cameras? Konica, the company that does its darndest to make the mainstream safe for the offbeat, has done it again, this time in tandem. The introduction of the Big Mini Zoom TR and the Zup 135 Super stood out as two of the most intriguing introductions during a year in which all sorts of innovative point-andshoots arrived.
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0022.xml
article
22
22
POINT & SHOOT
[no value]
Go Shooting Into Infinity!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Both of the pictures you see here are perfectly focused. We've been inhaling filmcleaner fumes again, eh? Nope. Take a look at the “unfocused” picture. There’s one reasonably sharp spot in it: that black bar, that looks sort of like a piece of tape.
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0023.xml
advertisement
23
23
[no value]
[no value]
Nikon.
[no value]
Nikon.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0024.xml
article
24
24
POINT & SHOOT
[no value]
1000-Speed Is One Grand Film for P/Sers!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Lately, a lot of people here have been walking around with fistfuls of snapshots, showing them off to one another. It has nothing to do with wanting to look at our colleagues’ nieces and nephews or in-laws or pets. And people aren't cooing “How cute!"
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0025.xml
advertisement
25
25
[no value]
[no value]
NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0026.xml
advertisement
26
26
[no value]
[no value]
Studiomate
[no value]
Studiomate
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0027.xml
advertisement
26
26
[no value]
[no value]
Tocad America, Inc.
[no value]
Tocad America, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0028.xml
advertisement
27
27
[no value]
[no value]
ADORAMA
[no value]
ADORAMA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0029.xml
article
28
28,29,155,158
Nature
[no value]
Nature
Freeze ’em, blur ’em, pan ’em: Use your speeds right and you’ll shutter with delight!
Consider subject speed
High speeds for drama
[no value]
[no value]
Tim Davis & Renee Lynn
Do your pictures look like you’re in a rut? Maybe you’re really caught in a speed trap instead. If you want to add extra life to your photographs you probably need to look no further than your camera’s shutterspeed control. Get out of the rut and experiment with your shutter speeds!
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0030.xml
advertisement
30
30
[no value]
[no value]
Pentex Corporation,
[no value]
Pentex Corporation,
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0031.xml
article
30
30
NEW!
[no value]
NEW!
What, a pro point & shoot 645 autofocus camera?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Why should there be so many mediumformat 120 rollfilm cameras and nary a one with autofocus? Why indeed, thought Fuji and so the Fuji GA645 Pro was born, complete with built-in, popup flash. The GA645 Pro has a 60mm f/4 lens, which focuses to three feet, and a dual AF system, active for close focusing and passive for distant subjects.
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0032.xml
advertisement
31
31
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0033.xml
advertisement
32
32
[no value]
[no value]
KODAK
[no value]
KODAK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0034.xml
article
33
33,34,35,36,37,38,39,40
FEATURES
[no value]
COCAINE TRUE COCAINE BLUE
How Eugene Richards made the photographs:
[no value]
[no value]
Herbert Keppler
The next six pages contain perhaps the most powerful and disturbing pictures ever printed in POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY magazine. These searing, unforgettable photographs showing how the drug scene is tearing apart our inner cities are by Eugene Richards, one of our finest The pictures and others from his frightening book, Cocaine True, Cocaine Blue (Aperture, New York, NY; hardcover, $40), uncover the horrors of today’s drug culture.
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0035.xml
article
41
41
FEATURES
[no value]
A FANCY FOR FEATHERS
How a close-up lens system may be mightier than the quill
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
If you view a feather up close, you will discover a wealth of hidden abstract design possibilities. The variety and diversity of color and pattern in the feathers of the thousands of bird species surpasses that of many other subjects. Feathers have received little photographic attention, perhaps because photographers assume suitable ones are difficult to find.
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0036.xml
article
42
42,43,44,45,46,47,48,49,170
FEATURES
[no value]
HOW TO HANDLE PERSPECTIVE
If it’s knock-out photography you want, make sure perspective is in your corner !!!
Here’s how changing persp ective can expand or conir ract space for you.
Wide-angle faces too wide or too thin? There’s nothing wrong with your lens: Blame it on perspective!
Perspective: The long and the short of it.
50mm from three feet away.
No, you don’t need a pro’s arsenal of lenses to make use of perspective.
Perspective and portraiture
Keeping Lines Parallel, Part I
Yes you can make a flattering portrait with a wide-angle lens!
Full-body portraiture: Which is better, near or far perspective?
Keeping Parallel Lines Parallel, Part II: Do it yourself—in the darkroom.
Near perspective and close-up photography
Is perspective directly linked to lens focal length? Nope.
Itoo ways to get close: Walk up or zoom up. Which Is better?
Now let's put perspective to work III,
Perspective's other side
[no value]
[no value]
Peter Kolonia
Tonight's Card? Violent versus Gentle Perspective! You don’t have to guess which version of this boxer exemplifies violent and which gentle perspective. (The larger shot is surely more “violent.”) How can you recreate it in your own photography?
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0037.xml
article
50
50,51,52,53,54,55,56,57,72
FEATURES
[no value]
DAVID MUENCH: LARGE MASTER GOES 35MM!
Form follows format?
[no value]
[no value]
Herbert Keppler
Ten years ago it was a near rule that major landscape photographers would not touch a 35mm camera. But David Muench has always been an exception to rules. Both 35mm and 4x5 have been important continued on page 54 tools for him during most of his 30-year free-lance professional life as one of the U.S.’ premier landscape photographers.
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0038.xml
article
58
58,59,60,61,130
FEATURES
[no value]
IS THIS PHOTOGRAPHY
Is it still a photograph?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Many people, including some of our long-time friends, are very upset that we publish digitally manipulated photos from time to time, and that we even have a column, “New Frontiers”, largely devoted to electronie imaging.
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0039.xml
article
62
62,63,64
FEATURES
[no value]
TEST
OLYMPUS 35-80mm f/2.8
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Hands on: Extremely well-made, smoothly operating zoom with ample, easily grippable, rubberized zoom ring and extra-wide, studded, focusing collar. Bright, highly legible markings with distance scale in white for meters and orange for feet.
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0040.xml
advertisement
65
65
[no value]
[no value]
NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0041.xml
article
66
66,67,84
Photo tronics
[no value]
Photo tronics
What’s the latest scoop on batteries? More mercury equivalents in new sizes!
[no value]
[no value]
James Bailey
Here’s the latest on the battery front. At the recent Photo Marketing Association (PMA) show, The Saunders Group [21 Jet View Drive, Rochester, NY 14624, (716) 328-7800] was showing the Wein cells, which we reviewed in March [page 157].
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0042.xml
advertisement
67
67
[no value]
[no value]
THE SAUNDERS GROUP
[no value]
THE SAUNDERS GROUP
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0043.xml
advertisement
67
67
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: PHOPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
[no value]
PHOPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0044.xml
advertisement
67
67
[no value]
[no value]
Studiomate
[no value]
Studiomate
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0045.xml
advertisement
68
68
[no value]
[no value]
TMW MEDIA GROUP
[no value]
TMW MEDIA GROUP
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0046.xml
advertisement
69
69
[no value]
[no value]
Tamrac, Inc.
[no value]
Tamrac, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0047.xml
advertisement
70
70,71
[no value]
[no value]
RITZ CAMERA CENTERS
[no value]
RITZ CAMERA CENTERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0048.xml
advertisement
72
72
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0049.xml
advertisement
73
73,74,75
[no value]
[no value]
BEACH CAMERA
[no value]
BEACH CAMERA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0050.xml
article
76
76,78,158
COLOR
[no value]
COLOR
It’s a close battle for the coveted title “King of the ISO 200 print films.”
New 200-Speed Films: Can you tell the difference?
33X Enlargements
[no value]
[no value]
Michael J. McNamara
Quick! What speed color-print film is in your camera right now? We’d guess it’s ISO 200—and chances are we’d be right for most of you. That’s because ISO 200 print film is, by far, the topselling film these days. So when four leading film companies recently introduced new or improved versions of their ISO 200 color-print films, we had to find out which one would rightfully claim the title “best” in the most important film race of all! First, why is ISO 200 such a popular, all-purpose color-print film speed? The obvious reason is because ISO 200 films offer improved low-light capability over their ISO 100 and slower siblings (which directly equates to faster shutter speeds and increased depth of field) without alarming loss of fine grain or color saturation.
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0051.xml
advertisement
77
77
[no value]
[no value]
DATA VISION
[no value]
DATA VISION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0052.xml
advertisement
78
78
[no value]
[no value]
SLIK DIVISION OF TOCAD AMERICA, INC.
[no value]
SLIK DIVISION OF TOCAD AMERICA, INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0053.xml
advertisement
79
79,80,81,82,83
[no value]
[no value]
CAMERA WORLD OF ORGEON
[no value]
CAMERA WORLD OF ORGEON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0054.xml
advertisement
84
84
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0055.xml
advertisement
84
84
[no value]
[no value]
Paul C. Buff, Inc.
[no value]
Paul C. Buff, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0056.xml
advertisement
84
84
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0057.xml
advertisement
85
85
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0058.xml
advertisement
86
86,87,88,89
[no value]
[no value]
CAMBRIDGE
[no value]
CAMBRIDGE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0059.xml
advertisement
90
90
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0060.xml
advertisement
91
91
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0061.xml
review
92
92,102
[no value]
[no value]
Just out
Coming to a screen near you!
You’ll get a charge out of this
A coat for all seasons
Flash flipper
Have gray card, will travel
Solid Gold
We’re hooked!
Triple duty
Instant organizer for instant prints
Two processors in one
Need a light?
Extra vivid
TGTBT?
Tree’s company
Stopping time
Customize your PC
New for the studio
Rapid rollfilm
Scanning for the rest of us
Keep your cool
Maxell Corp.
[no value]
Maxell Corp.
IBM-compatible computer screen.
$1.99
Coming a screen near Looking for a new way to showcase your photography? Try mounting it on your IBM-compatible computer screen. No, not with tape or glue, but with PC Portraits ($19.95) a software program that uses your own photography as a Windows screen saver utility. Displayed in a slide show-like loop, any number of your photos can appear on the screen whenever you’re not using the computer for other chores. You can control which images and their frequency, but first you must have them digitized by the PC Portrait folks, a service included in the price of the software. Your first five photos are free; each additional costs $1.99 in U.S. currency and about 140 KB of harddrive space. (Fishpot Images, P.O. Box 438, Ballwin, MO 63022.)
Maxell Corp.
Maxell’s Camcorder Plus battery pack
S59—$99
Maxell’s Camcorder Plus battery pack S59—$99 is not only rechargeable, it’s selfcharging. That’s right, no recharger required! When the battery poops out, you simply detach it from your camcorder, flip out the built-in plug, and insert it into the nearest maxell electrical outlet. Several models have LED gauges which show how much of the battery's twohour charge is left, and all are universally designed to fit most 8mm and VHS-C camcorders, including Sony, Sharp, and JVC. (Maxell Corp. of America, 22-08 Route 208, Fair Lawn, NJ 07410.)
Maxell Corp.
[no value]
$198
You thought multicoating was only for camera lenses, right? Not any more. Schneider now offers it in a loupe. In fact, there are two new Schneider magnifiers that employ multicoating to reduce reflection and increase contrast when used to view slides or negatives on a lightbox. Schneider claims that in product testing, the coated loupes displayed a “significant improvement” in brightness and color fidelity. The two magnifiers—a 4X for 35mm originals $198 and a 3.5X for 6x6 originals ($350)—also feature improved resistance to optical scratching the to the abrasio resistant coat ing. Schneider Corp. of America, 400 Crossways Park Dr., Woodbury, NY 11797.)
Maxell Corp.
Flash flipper
$109.95
Photographers impressed with the flashflipping convenience— but not the heft—of Stroboframe’s Pro-T flash bracket, have a new option to consider. The Press-T bracket offers plenty of flash-positioning flexibility for small and medium-format shooters, but it’s more compact and lighter weight than its predecessor. Like similar brackets, the Press-T $109.95 flips to keep your blitzrig—whether shoeor handle-mount—above the lens axis. This effectively buries a subject’s shadow below and behind the subject, in addition to eliminating redeye. The bracket marries directly with Stroboframe’s quick-release system, and adapters for most flash types are available. (The Saunders Group, 21 Jet View Dr., Rochester, NY 14624.)
Maxell Corp.
[no value]
$9
gray card, Photographers who make their own color prints know how difficult it can be to find the proper filter pack. This is doubly difficult for those who often shoot under varying light sources, or who regularly change paper or film brands. Of course, you could shoot and reshoot a gray card every time light temperature changes, but who has a gray card around at all times? Well, now you can. The Mitchell Gray Key $9 is a hybrid of the gray card and, get this, it’s a key chain. The entire Gray Key slips easily into your pocket or camera bag. While its chain takes care of your keys, the mini 18-percent gray card, which is made of tough, scuff-proof, nonrcflective plastic, will take care of your color filter pack. Rephotograph the card every time light temperature or film type changes; then later, in the darkroom, you can pull out your key chain for an casy-to-match color target. (Bob Mitchell’s Darkroom, 707 Myrtle Ave., St. Joseph, MI 49085.)
Maxell Corp.
Solid Gold
$3.25
Looking for a way to add a caption or perhaps your signature to a print? How about gold-leaf lettering? You can apply it yourself easily and in expensively with the Hot Tool Permanent Marking Kit $26.95, which works not only with prints, but with leather and vinyl as well. You simply place the gold foil on the print (or album) and lightly apply pressure as you write with the easy-to-use, heat-transfer pen. Other colors are available at a cost of $3.25 per roll, and the kit supplies everything you’ll need—except attractive penmanship! (Hot Tools, 24 Tioga Way, Marblehead, MA 01945.)
Maxell Corp.
[no value]
$49.95
Just when you thought there could be no new tripod features.... The latest is from Vivitar and you’ll find it on their VPT-15 video/still tri-legger $49.95 A more-or-less conventional tripod with a frictioncontrolled, crank-operated center column, built-in quick release, and an eye-level extended height of 58 inches, the VPT-15 has three unusual features: It's amazingly lightweight (2 pounds), has a built-in carrying handle (always nice), and features a hook located below the center post from which you can hang your camera bag for convenience and/or for added stability! Vivitar Corp., 1280 Rancho Conejo Boulevard, Newbury Park. CA 91319-2559.)
Maxell Corp.
[no value]
$395
Some remote shutter triggers use infrared beams, others use sound. With the former, you project the beam like a trip wire, and when the subject breaks it, your camera (or flash) fires. For the latter, when a user-set decibel threshold is crossed, the sound waves trigger the firing. Now, for the first time, someone has combined both these options and added a third: optical slave firing as well. The Shutter-Beam from Woods Electronics $395 uses sound, motion, or light to fire flash, studio strobes, or cameras with electronic remotefiring capability. The unit weighs 1 pound, 8 ounces, runs on two internal 9-volt batteries or external power, measures 6¾x6x18/7 inches (WxDxH) and is outfitted with a standard tripod socket for easy mounting. Woods Electronics, Inc., 14781 Pomerado Rd., #197, Poway, CA 92064.)
Maxell Corp.
[no value]
$25
Anyone who uses 669-type Polaroid pccl-apart prints for proofing will recognize this scenario: Within minutes of shooting, Polaroid test prints arc scattered hither, thither and yon. The TesTrac $25 is a 12x15inch organizer for Polaroid prints that uses an adhesive-coated grid to hold up to six test prints, ending the confusion of lost or disorganized proof prints. An acetate overlay and a set of miniature cropping L’s facilitate grease-pencil cropping and additional annotation. (Dickinson Photo Communications, Box 1003, Cincinnati, OH 45253.)
Maxell Corp.
[no value]
$199
Unless they own a dozen or more drums, color printers who use rotary processors are plagued with having to wash and dry the drums between processing runs. This cuts session output dramatically, and throws into stark relief the advantages of drumless, dip-and-dunk-style slot processors (like the Nova). Now, the legions who own Jobo CPE-2 rotary processors can convert those machines into dip-n-dunkers at less than half the cost of a Nova. Jobo’s new JoMatc $199 includes four 8x10-inch slots (“pods”) that slide into a thick acrylic cover which clamps over the CPE-2, marrying the temperature control of a Jobo with the convenience of a Nova. More info? Call Jobo at 313/995-4192.
Maxell Corp.
[no value]
$200
Sunpak surveyed high-end flash owners and found that few actually used their flashes’ advanced features. In fact, most photographers admitted to setting their units to Auto TIL 3nd simply leaving ’em there. The upshot of this insight is the Sunpak PowerZoom 4000AF, a high-end shoe-mount flash for AF cameras with pared-down features and a mid-range price. Stripped of multiple power settings (it offers full and 16/1-powcr only), stroboscopic mode, and D-lens compatibility in its Nikon incarnation, the new Sunpak is able to offer power zooming, second-curtain sync, an AF-assist light and a back-illuminated LCD panel (with auto distance ranges) for about $200. Not bad. Other significant data: a 28-80mm zoom range, a Guide Number of 130 (at ISO 100/80mm setting), and an optional external power pack. In versions for Canon, Minolta, and Nikon cameras. (Tocad America; 201/428-9800.)
Maxell Corp.
[no value]
$21.85
Studio photographers who use super-saturated slide films like Fuji Vclvia or Kodak Lumiere have a problem when it comes to instant prints used for proofing: the transparencies that ultimately come back from the lab will always be much more intensely saturated than the proofs. Solution? Polaroid’s ProVivid instant color peel-apart film (Type 689). Its super-saturated color palette (those greens!) drips with color every bit as intense as Vclvia shot on a sunny summer day. Only downside? It won’t work for image or emulsion transfers. Available in ten-shot 34/1x41/4-in. packs, ProVivid 689 is rated at ISO 100, develops in 90 seconds, and carries a suggested list price of $21.85 per pack. Polaroid Corp., 575 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139.)
Maxell Corp.
[no value]
$199
From the description supplied by its importer, Mastertouch Retouching Inks looks like one of those TGTBT (Too Good To Be True) products. A recent import from Great Britain, these acryliclike retouching colors can be applied as true opaques for heavy retouching/painting, or transparently for hand-tinted effects. Unlike oils, they dry in minutes and can be completely removed (using a Mastertouch Solvent) even years after application. Once dry, they leave no trace on the paper surface: a matte surface remains matte; a glossy surface remains glossy. TGTBT? You decide. The eight-color Mastertouch Pack (including accessories) goes for—gulp—$199. (Argraph, 111 Asia Place, Carlstadt, NJ 07072.)
Maxell Corp.
[no value]
$168.93.
Don’t want to lug a tripod when venturing out into Mother Nature’s kingdom? Try the Tree-Pod. It assists you in taking sharp pictures by holding the camera steady, yet requires little effort or camera bag space to tote along. The strap-mount version features a seven-foot long, inch-wide cord that you loop around a tree trunk. To this, you attach an anodized aluminum arm and three-way panhead for flexible, jiggle-free shooting. The setup pictured here weighs a bit more than three pounds and costs $168.93. Tree-Pod Inc., P.O. Box 7548, St. Cloud, MN 56302.)
Maxell Corp.
LED panel
$329
Kearsarge, the industrial darkroom folks, have unveiled a darkroom timer, the “302,” that counts down enlarger exposure times in the usual seconds or in not-so-common stops. If a test print is a bit too dark, you can dial in a -1/4-stop adjustment. Other features: the 302's audio alert beeps either in tenths of the overall exposure time (for burning or dodging), or every 30 seconds (for film developing). The timer’s unusually informative, alphanumeric LED panel has several brightness levels, including an “off” setting. Encased in stainless steel, the 302 is especially rugged, a good thing considering its $329 list price. More info? Call 413/625-2322.
Maxell Corp.
[no value]
The “here” in the product called “Your Photo Here” is your PC. You buy the mailer, send five photos to Leisure Ware, Inc., and they’ll send you back a disk (Windows 3.1) that turns your photos into a background screen (wallpaper) or a screen saver. Screen saver special effects include pixel-by-pixel picture assembly, a drizzling rain effect, moving puzzle pieces, and more—you choose, you change. Much more fun than flying windows, especially if you sneak it into someone clsc’s computer! Extremely user-friendly, with a Macintosh version on the way. (1725 Wells St., Ann Arbor, MI 48104.)
Maxell Corp.
[no value]
$75
A couple of years back, grids were added to studio softboxes to give you some directional control of lighting, while keeping the light’s overall quality soft and directionless. 'Hie problem? The grids (or louvers) were aluminum, weighed twice as much as the softboxes, and were a pain to attach, control, store, and transport. Now, the Pro Studio Supply company has taken the next logical step: they’ve made a softbox grid of lightweight plastic and cloth. In two sizes (narrow and wide patterns), the grids fold flat and collapse together for easy storage, Fit into Photoflex and Chimera softboxes (using Velcro), and cost between $75 and $249 depending on softbox size. (Pro Studio Supply, 650 Armour Rd., Oconomowoc, WI 53066-0046.)
Maxell Corp.
Rapid rollfilm
$2.95
Quick: Which black-and-white 120 rollfilm has the fastest nominal speed rating? If you guessed a Kodak, Ilford, or Fuji product, blush now. Neither Kodak’s T-Max P3200 nor Fuji’s Neopan 1600 are the 120 format, making the correct answer—tada!—Fomapan T800. Manufactured in the Czech Republic and marketed here in maroon-and-gray packaging of unintentionally retro styling, Fomapan T800 at ISO 800 is claimed to be the fastest panchromatic black-and-white rollfilm in the world. It’s reputedly pushablc to ISO 3200. Priced at $2.95, a 120 roll of T800 comes with processing instructions for 13 different developer possibilities. While not available in 220 rolls, T800 does come in 35mm cartridges and in 35mm bulk rolls in lengths as long as 305 meters! FOMA USA, Inc., 3237 Longfellow Ave., Minneapolis, MN 55407.)
Maxell Corp.
[no value]
$49; 8
More and more companies are getting onto the digitized snapshot bandwagon, putting photos on computer floppy disks at the point of processing. But here’s a system that lets you do it yourself by scanning your existing snaps into your computer. The EasyPhoto motorized scanner will accept any print up to four inches wide and operates far easier than a hand scanner. Once the photo is digitized, the EasyPhoto software lets you lighten, darken, or change contrast of the picture; manipulate the color; remove scratches (or blemishes); and integrate the pictures into any other computer application. EasyPhoto software is available at present only on CD-ROM for Windows $49; 8 MB of RAM required); the complete package with reader, software, and connectors is $249. For more information, call Storm Software at 800/275-5734 or e-mail info@stormsoft.com.
Maxell Corp.
[no value]
Bencher
With the heat generated from the average quartzlit copy stand, you could cook a three-course meal. Welcome relief from the heat comes from the Bencher VP310 copy stand, which, in addition to offering wobble-free operation and even illumination, also features a low-intensity lamp setting for composing and focusing. This prolongs the lamp life and keeps the area cool. When you’re ready to shoot, you switch on the high beams and fire away. Rigid lampsupport arms have built-in 45-dcgree indexing, and some models feature a quartz base light for photographing transparencies. (Bencher, 708/238-1183.)
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0062.xml
advertisement
93
93,94,95,96,97,98,99
[no value]
[no value]
SMAILE PHOTO & VIDEO
[no value]
SMAILE PHOTO & VIDEO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0063.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
BI-RITE PHOTO & ELECTRONICS
[no value]
BI-RITE PHOTO & ELECTRONICS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0064.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0065.xml
advertisement
103
103,104,105,106,107,108,109,110,111,112,113,114,115,116,117,118,119,120,121,122,123,124,125
[no value]
[no value]
B&H PHOTO-VIDEO
[no value]
B&H PHOTO-VIDEO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0066.xml
advertisement
126
126,127,128,129
[no value]
[no value]
PEACH STATE PHOTO
[no value]
PEACH STATE PHOTO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0067.xml
advertisement
130
130,131,132,133
[no value]
[no value]
ABE'S OF MAIN
[no value]
ABE'S OF MAIN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0068.xml
advertisement
134
134,135
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0069.xml
article
134
134
Books
[no value]
Books
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Baseball’s Golden Age: The Photographs of Charles M. Conlon, by Neal McCabe and Constance McCabe. Harry N. Abrams, New York, NY; 198 pages, 205 black-and-white photos; hardcover, $29.95. The transformation of spectator sports from popular entertainment to national obsession has had innumerable unfortunate side effects.
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0070.xml
advertisement
136
136,137,138,139
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0071.xml
advertisement
140
140
[no value]
[no value]
AAA CAMERA EXCHANGE,INC.
[no value]
AAA CAMERA EXCHANGE,INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0072.xml
advertisement
141
141
[no value]
[no value]
GIFTTIME DISCOUNT CENTER
[no value]
GIFTTIME DISCOUNT CENTER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0073.xml
advertisement
142
142,143
[no value]
[no value]
MARINE PARK CAMERA & VIDEO INC.
[no value]
MARINE PARK CAMERA & VIDEO INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0074.xml
advertisement
144
144,145,146,147
[no value]
[no value]
EXECUTIVE PHOTO AND ILECTRONICS
[no value]
EXECUTIVE PHOTO AND ILECTRONICS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0075.xml
advertisement
148
148,149,150,151,152,153,154
[no value]
[no value]
focus Camera & Video
[no value]
focus Camera & Video
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0076.xml
advertisement
155
155
[no value]
[no value]
Kodak
[no value]
Kodak
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0077.xml
advertisement
156
156
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0078.xml
advertisement
157
157
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0079.xml
advertisement
158
158,159,160,161,162,163,164,165,166,167,168,169,170,171
[no value]
[no value]
Kodak
[no value]
Kodak
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0080.xml
advertisement
171
171
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0081.xml
article
172
172
Too hot to handle
[no value]
Too hot to handle
Honest, forthright answers to your most probing questions
Focus fracas
Data or drivel?
Digital dilemma
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
I really think you owe your readers a better explanation for the focusing difficulty with the Contax G1 (“Test: Contax Gl,” April ’95, page 62|. It’s more than a bit comical to read about the 23-inch rangefinder base length, making it “one of the most accurate.
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0082.xml
advertisement
173
173
[no value]
[no value]
RICOH CORPORATION,
[no value]
RICOH CORPORATION,
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0083.xml
advertisement
174
174
[no value]
[no value]
PENTAX CORPORATION.
[no value]
PENTAX CORPORATION.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularPhotography_19950801_0059_008_0084.xml