Issue: 19741101

Friday, November 1, 1974
000251
November
11
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21
Tuesday, July 15, 2014
8/4/2016 12:40:27 AM

Articles
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Lorrilard
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200050_19741101_031361.xml
cover
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Cover
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Cover Description
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[The following text appears on the cover]
200050_19741101_031362.xml
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200050_19741101_031363.xml
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Chrybler
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200050_19741101_031364.xml
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R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
Salem
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200050_19741101_031365.xml
article
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From the Editor
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Playbill
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The Day Before Richard Nixon resigned the Presidency, a European newspaperobserved that his political methods "were not only those of a poker player but of a man who cheats at poker." We don't know if Nixon's played much poker lately, but we do know that he played—and won—quite a bit when he was in the Navy. We know because a couple of his victims have told us all about it in Full House at the White House, which is but one part of I'll Play These, a package of articles dealing with various aspects of poker, assembled by Senior Editor G. Barry Golson—a persistent player who claims to have broken even over the years. In addition to Golson's history of the game, there's Jon Carroll's well-tested playing tips; Richard Warren Lewis' account of a highstakes Showdown in Vegas; and Hollywood stars such as Jack Lemmon and Telly Savalas in Table Talk. We've also dealt you nostalgia by authors' agent Scott Meredith—who looks back on the fabled poker shoot-outs between the Marx Brothers and assorted literary lions in The Algonquin Games (it will reappear in his book George S. Kaufman and His Friends, which Doubleday is about to publish)—and a memoir by playwright Jack Richardson, who describes an encounter with a beauteous lady player in Coming Down in Gardena (to be included in his forthcoming Simon & Schuster book, Gambling). The acrylic illustration for Meredith's piece and the oil painting that accompanies Richardson's are by a winning pair of Chicago artists, Anton Jacobs and Gastone Bettilli.
200050_19741101_031366.xml
masthead
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Copyright
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Address_Copyright_Credit
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General Offices: Playboy Building, 919 North Michigan Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60611. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, drawings and photographs submitted if they are to be returned and no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited materials. All rights in letters sent to Playboy will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication and copyright purposes and as subject to Playboy's unrestricted right to edit and to comment editorially. Contents Copyright © 1974 by Playboy all rights reserved. Playboy and rabbit head symbol are marks of Playboy, Registered U. S. Patent Office, Marca Registrada. Margue Deposee nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. Any similarity between the people and places in the fiction and semifiction in this magazine and any real people and places is purely coincidental Credits: Cover: Playmate/Model Claudia Jennings, Designed by Arthur Paul. Photography by Bill Arsenault, Other Photography by; Bill Arsenault. P. 109; Don Azuma, P. 115; Dave Bahm, P. 3; Christine Baldwin. P 3; The Bettmann Archive, Inc., P 110 (2); Charles W. Bush. P. 3 (2); Rick Cluthe, P. 3; Jeff Cochen, P. 3; B. T. Collins, P. 3. Culver Pictures, Inc., P. 110 (2); Malcom E. Emmons P. 105; Bill Frantz, P 3; Carl Iri, P. 3 (2); Dick Izul, P. 140-141. Pompeo Posar, P. 112 (5), 113 (5); Suzanne Seed, P. 3 (2) Shotwell. P. 3; Linda Wheeler. P. 3 (2); Wide World Photos. P. 3 P. 144-155. From the Collections of: Gideon Bachmann Collection. Angelo Frontoni, Brian D. Hennessey. Yves Manciet/Gamma, Ralph Nelson. Marie-Alena Prime, David Bruce Rawcliffe (2), Morgan Renaro (3) Steve Schapiro/Transworld (2), David Steen, Eric Weston, P. 109-114. Illustrations by Gastone Bettilli, Anton Jacobs, John Schmelzer.
200050_19741101_031367.xml
tableOfContents
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Table of Contents
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Contents for the Men's Entertainment Magazine
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Vol. 21, no. 11—november, 1974
200050_19741101_031368.xml
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Somerest Imports Ltd.
Johnnie Walker Red
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200050_19741101_031369.xml
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Minolta
Camera
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200050_19741101_031370.xml
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Masthead
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Masthead
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Hugh M. Hefnereditor and publisher
200050_19741101_031371.xml
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7
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Van Munching & Co.
Heineken
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200050_19741101_031372.xml
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8,9
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Tale of the Fox
Audi
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200050_19741101_031373.xml
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Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation
Kool
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200050_19741101_031374.xml
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11
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Tabasco
Tabasco
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200050_19741101_031375.xml
article
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11,12,14
Letters to the Editor
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Dear Playboy
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Address Playboy Magazine • Playboy Building, 919 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60611
200050_19741101_031376.xml
other
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Indicia
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Indicia
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Playboy, November, 1974, Volume 21, Number 11. Published monthly by Playboy, Playboy Building, 919 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60611. Subscriptions: In the United States. Its Possessions and Canada, $24 for three years, $18 for two years, $10 for one year. Elsewhere $15 per year. Allow 30 days for new subscriptions and renewals. Change of Address: Send both old and new addresses to Playboy, Playboy Building, 919 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60611, and Allow 30 days for change. Marketing: Richard S. Rosenzweig, Director of Marketing; Emery Smyth, Marketing Services Director; Nelson Futch, Marketing Manager; Lee Gottlieb, Director of Public Relations. Advertising: Howard W. Lederer, Advertising Director; Herbert D. Maneloveg, Associate Advertising Director; Jules Kase, Joseph Guenther, Associate Advertising Managers, 747 Third Avenue, New York, New York 10017; Chicago, Sherman Keats, Manager, 919 North Michigan Avenue; Detroit, William F. Moore, Manager, 818 Fisher Building; Los Angeles, Stanley L. Perkins, Manager, 8721 Beverly Boulevard; San Francisco, Robert E. Stephens, Manager, 417 Montgomery Street.
200050_19741101_031377.xml
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Bank America Service Corp.
Bank America Service
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200050_19741101_031378.xml
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Gordon's Dry Cin Co., Ltd
Vodka
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200050_19741101_031379.xml
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American Honda Motor Co. Inc.
Car
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200050_19741101_031380.xml
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16,17
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Bell & Howell Schools
TV
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200050_19741101_031381.xml
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Marlboro
Cigarettes
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200050_19741101_031382.xml
review
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19,20
Review
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Playboy After Hours
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Hail, hail, the gang's almost here: An inmate of the Federal penitentiary at Allentown, Pennsylvania, went to the prison library to get a copy of the Bernstein-Woodward book on the breaking of the Watergate story. "Do you have All the President's Men?" he asked. To which the prison librarian replied, "Not quite."
200050_19741101_031383.xml
review
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Review
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Erotica
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The Pleasure Chest started out as a rather simple shop in the Village in New York, selling water beds, mood lighting and cock rings. But soon the clientele created such a demand for other things that the owners had no choice but to manufacture and sell ... well, other things. Now when you walk into the midtown Pleasure Chest outlet, you see a wall covered with other things, a cabinet filled with other things, a cabinet filled with other things, shelves crammed with them and—behind a beaded curtain—racks of other things. What puts The Pleasure Chest in a class of its own is that it is bright, casual, clean. It has the surface appointments of a boutique, unlike most places that sell two-foot-long dildos.
200050_19741101_031384.xml
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Carillon Importers, Ltd.
Grand Marnier
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200050_19741101_031385.xml
review
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22,24,25
Review-Books
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Books
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How is the catholicity of your reading—as T. S. Eliot might have put it—these days? Touching all the bases? Keeping up? All of that jive. Well, here are some nonfiction titles for you and if you can find any pattern to them, you should be working in a library and not fooling around reading big, expensive, glossy magazines.
200050_19741101_031386.xml
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Johnny Carson Apparel Inc.
Johny Carson
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200050_19741101_031387.xml
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24A
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General Wine & Spirits Co.
Rum Ronrico
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200050_19741101_031388.xml
review
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25,28,30,32,34,36,38
Review-Films
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Movies
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Part of Vienna and the back lot at Universal Studios substitute for Moscow in The Girl from Petrovka, a pallid comedy that dimly recalls Garbo's Ninotchka the way Rock Hudson and Doris Day might have played it at their peak. Adrift in the title role, goggle-eyed Goldie Hawn establishes beyond a doubt that she is neither Garbo nor a girl from Petrovka (though she may, in fact, be the new Doris Day). Hal Holbrook at least manages to act with face-saving skill as a roving American newspaper correspondent who finds love and then loses it—when his wayward Russian bird, a free soul and would-be ballerina, is sentenced to five years in a penal colony because the Soviet socialist state considers her a parasite. That's pretty heavy slogging for a romantic comedy, even though director Robert Ellis Miller and his scenarists (Allan Scott and Chris Bryant, who adapted Don't Look Now) obviously intended it to be a heart tugger between yoks. More than 30 years after Ninotchka, no evidence is produced that World War Two, the Cold War or détente have had any effect whatever on writers' tapping out the same frayed, familiar East-meets-West jibes. "I vill give my body vunce a veek in exchange for the rent, including bathroom," is a fair example of the dross handed to Goldie, who reportedly visited Moscow in preparation for her role ("to study the mood of the people," claims a sober press release). The mood must have been gloomy.
200050_19741101_031389.xml
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24B
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Calvert Dist. Co.
Passport Scotch
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200050_19741101_031390.xml
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Early Times Distillery Co.
Whisky
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200050_19741101_031391.xml
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Motorcycle Industry Council
Kawasaki
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200050_19741101_031392.xml
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Bose
Bose
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200050_19741101_031393.xml
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Schenley Imports Co.
Whisky
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200050_19741101_031394.xml
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The Shower Massage
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200050_19741101_031395.xml
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Diners Club
Diners Club
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200050_19741101_031396.xml
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John De Kuper & Son
Blackberry Brandy
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200050_19741101_031397.xml
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R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
Camel
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200050_19741101_031398.xml
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General Wine & Spirits Co.
Whisky
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200050_19741101_031399.xml
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Northwest Industries, Inc.
Dingo Boots
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200050_19741101_031400.xml
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Super Quad
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200050_19741101_031401.xml
review
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38,42,44,48,50,52
Review-Recorded Music
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Recordings
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Step right into our vinyl time machine, folks. Have we got a fantastic voyage for you! More than a quarter century ago, Anita O'Day turned out the tracks now reissued as Hi Ho Trailus Boot Whip (Bob Thiele Music). She has a varied assortment of musicians behind her, but they're excellent, for the most part; there are some class arrangements by Ralph Burns and Benny Carter and almost all the tunes are first-rate. However, what you're paying your money for is O'Day, and that's what you get—and how! The title tune (a marvelously jaunty scat song), How High the Moon, Malagueña, Sometimes I'm Happy, What Is This Thing Called Love, Key Largo, et al., show why the lady was at the top of her profession in those halcyon post-World War Two days. We've lost a lot of things since then, but, thank God, Anita O'Day is still around and singing up a storm.
200050_19741101_031402.xml
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Amity
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200050_19741101_031403.xml
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Cutty Sark
Whisky
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200050_19741101_031404.xml
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40,41
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Playboy
Playboy
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200050_19741101_031405.xml
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Jean Patou Paris
Amour Amour
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200050_19741101_031406.xml
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Lark
Filter Cigarettes
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200050_19741101_031407.xml
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44
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Hasselblad
Camera
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200050_19741101_031408.xml
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Dual
Dual
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200050_19741101_031409.xml
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Brands, Inc.
Ballantines
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200050_19741101_031410.xml
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Member Motorcycle Industry Council
Harley Davidson
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200050_19741101_031411.xml
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California Brandy
California Brandy
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200050_19741101_031412.xml
advertisement
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TDK
Cassette
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200050_19741101_031413.xml
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Warehouse Sound Co.
Music
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200050_19741101_031414.xml
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Amphora
Amphora
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200050_19741101_031415.xml
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Craig Car Strereo
Craig Car Stereo
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200050_19741101_031416.xml
advertisement
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Chrysler
Dodge
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200050_19741101_031417.xml
advertisement
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S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.
Edge
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200050_19741101_031418.xml
article
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55,56
Reader QA
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The Playboy Advisor
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Shortly after my boyfriend and I started living together, he bought me one of those bullet-shaped vibrators. He said that he wanted me to enjoy myself and to learn more about my responses. Well, I really got into it, or vice versa. I began to use the vibrator whenever he wasn't home. He asked me once which was better—the vibrator or him—and I told him the truth: that I preferred him. OK. But when he discovered that I sometimes masturbated while looking at pictures of nude men, he freaked out. He tore up the pictures and left a nasty note on our bed saying that I really knew how to get to him. I don't understand. I feel that he introduced me to a very beautiful experience, then pulled the rug out from under me. Can you explain his behavior?—Miss O. N., Virginia Beach, Virginia.
200050_19741101_031419.xml
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Brown & William Tobacco Corp.
Raleigh
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200050_19741101_031420.xml
advertisement
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Panasonic
Speaker
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200050_19741101_031421.xml
advertisement
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Beefeater
Dry Gin
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200050_19741101_031422.xml
article
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59,60,61,62,63,64,66,68,70,72
Reader Discussion
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The Playboy Forum
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Repealing Sex Laws
200050_19741101_031423.xml
article
60
60,61
Reader Discussion
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Forum Newsfront
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Cohabiting Cop
200050_19741101_031424.xml
advertisement
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62
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Keepsake
Diamond Ring
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200050_19741101_031425.xml
advertisement
WS1
WS1
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George Dickel
Whisky
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200050_19741101_031426.xml
advertisement
WS2
WS2
Display Ad
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Cribari & Sons
Beniamino
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200050_19741101_031427.xml
advertisement
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63
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American Tourister
Luggage
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200050_19741101_031428.xml
advertisement
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They're Theft-Proof
Radio
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200050_19741101_031429.xml
advertisement
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Display Ad
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Kaywoodie
Pipes
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200050_19741101_031430.xml
advertisement
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Polaroidn Corporation
Land Camera
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200050_19741101_031431.xml
advertisement
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Clanon Corporation of america
Radio
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200050_19741101_031432.xml
advertisement
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Canoe
Dana
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200050_19741101_031433.xml
advertisement
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Bulova Accutron
Watch
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200050_19741101_031434.xml
advertisement
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Crow Distillery Company
Whisky
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200050_19741101_031435.xml
advertisement
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Yashica
Camera
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200050_19741101_031436.xml
advertisement
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Pioneer
Radio
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200050_19741101_031437.xml
advertisement
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Sheffer
Pen
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advertisement
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JOY
Jean Patou
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advertisement
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National Sales Group
Cubo
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200050_19741101_031440.xml
advertisement
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Twist
Lemon Menthol
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200050_19741101_031441.xml
advertisement
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Sony
Record
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200050_19741101_031442.xml
article
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75,76,78,82,84,86,88,90,245,246
Playboy Interview
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Hunter Thompson
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Hunter Stockton Thompson was born and grew up in Louisville, Kentucky, and for the past 15 years has worked as a free-lance writer. began it all in t Air Force by lying his way into a job as sports editor of t base newspaper. He was fired and threatened with duty in Iceland when his superiors discovered that he was also writing about sports for a civilian paper under another name. After he was discharged, he took writing jobs and was fired from them in Pennsylvania (for destroying his editor's car), in Middletown, New York (where he insulted an advertiser and kicked a candy machine to death), at Time magazine (for his attitude) and in Puerto Rico, where the bowling magazine he was working for failed and he decided to give up journalism. He moved to Big Sur, where his wife, Sandy, made motel beds while he wrote a novel that was never published.
200050_19741101_031443.xml
advertisement
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Display Ad
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North American philips Corporation
Norelco Vip
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[no value]
200050_19741101_031444.xml
advertisement
79
79
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Renfied importers, Ltd.
Cointreau
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031445.xml
advertisement
80
80,81
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Benson & Hedges
Sweepstakes
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031446.xml
advertisement
82
82
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Garrard
Music
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031447.xml
advertisement
83
83
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Puerto Rican Rums
White Rum
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031448.xml
advertisement
85
85
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Blue Bell, Inc.
Wrangler Sportswear
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031449.xml
advertisement
87
87
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Canadian Whisky
Windsor
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031450.xml
advertisement
89
89
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Ligget & Myers Incorporated
L M
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031451.xml
advertisement
91
91
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031452.xml
article
93
92,93,94,96,102,201,202
Feature
[no value]
The Legend of Step-and-a-Half
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Paul Reb
Niggerheads, those peculiar columnar, closely spaced, grassy-topped swamp humps to be found here and there in the Northland, especially when you are not looking for them and are on foot and are in a hurry to get somewhere, besides being the worthy subject of more than one impeccably written scientific paper, are, beyond any doubt, the meanest, rottenest, sneakiest, most miserable, deplorable, reprehensible things to be found in all Alaska. (The Canadians can do their own complaining.) If you ever run out of four-letter words, take a lesson from the old Niggerhead Indians, sometimes disrespectfully called the Nastymouths: Go walk on niggerheads. You'll soon come up with some more—maybe even a best seller. Whew! I hate to think of it.
200050_19741101_031453.xml
article
95
95
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Eldon Dedini
[no value]
200050_19741101_031454.xml
pictorial
97
97,98,99,100,101
Pictorial
[no value]
Spec-Tacular
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Throughout most of recorded history, it's been a pretty dismal scene for those poor young things who were cursed with some sort of myopia or other. Glasses! Better leprosy. All the bespectacled girls we knew seemed to kind of give up in about fourth grade, studied their brains out and probably eventually married some adoring optician. If one wanted to socialize at all, it was a good idea to leave the horn-rims at home and bump into chairs all night. But not too long ago, all that changed. Glasses became glamorous and fun. Gloria Steinem showed up on talk shows wearing aviators' and looked terrific. And now? Well, gentlemen, feast your eyes on all that surrounds you here and realize how shortsighted you've been.
200050_19741101_031455.xml
article
103
103,216,220,222
Feature
[no value]
Is Anybody out There Doing His Job?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robert Sherrill
Ah, so You Are beginning to wonder what all those 2,851,576 civilians on the Federal payroll are doing to help you. When your mail is ten days late, you wonder. When they decide to build a Federal highway through your house, you wonder. You may also wonder when you hear that our benign bureaucrats are shipping tobacco labeled Food to Asian peasants.
200050_19741101_031456.xml
article
104
104,105,106,210,211,212,214
Feature
[no value]
The Big Picture
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Tom Zito
Plug an Advent VideoBeam in and it throws a dramatic four-by-six-foot television image onto a special screen placed eight feet in front of it. The color picture is bright and clear, free of the obvious scanning lines one expects on so large a display. Instead, Archie and Edith loom brilliant and literally larger than life, TV close-ups become surrealistic and linebacker Chris Hanburger's flying tackles leave the viewer's body jolted.
200050_19741101_031457.xml
article
107
107,108,134,214,215
Feature
[no value]
Sex and the Single Screw
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Nicholas Monsarrat
The Charter Business was very slack that summer and by mid-July, the topsail schooner Calypso owed money all round Nelson's Dockyard, and all over Antigua as well; otherwise, I don't think the skipper would have taken on the job. Usually, having six comfortable berths to fill besides our own quarters, we tried to get three married couples, or a mixture of the sexes, anyway, and it helped if one or two of the men knew their way about a sailing boat and could stand their trick at the wheel.
200050_19741101_031458.xml
pictorial
109
109
Photo Essay
[no value]
I'll Play These
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031459.xml
article
110
110,224,226,227
Feature
[no value]
Who Dealt This Mess?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
G.Barry Golson
Whither Poker?
200050_19741101_031460.xml
pictorial
110
110
Pictorial
[no value]
Poker's Greatest Hits
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031461.xml
article
111
111,203,204
Feature
[no value]
Table Talk
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Milton Berle: Do you remember how Ernie Kovacs used to carry a deck of cards around with him? Always wanted to play table-stakes poker. He was hooked on the game. It must have been 18 years ago that we were all at Dino's house—Tony Curtis, Dean Martin, the regular group. I wasn't playing; I was just kibitzing. The game began about eight P.M. and continued all through the night. The curtains were blacked out so there would be no distractions. Must have been 7:30 the next morning—they were still playing table stakes—when the phone rang. Before picking it up, Ernie said that great line: "I wonder who the hell could be calling me at this hour of the morning." Ernie didn't play very well. He lost a lot of money.
200050_19741101_031462.xml
article
112
112,232,234,236
Feature
[no value]
How Not to Lose Your Ass
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jon Carroll
Most of the Poker Games in this country, like most of the murders, happen at home, among people who know one another. Very rarely, except in cardrooms, do seven strangers sit down to play poker together. These private games are often ancient, shaped by several generations of poker players, laden with eccentric traditions and arcane conventions. To you, a stranger, it's a poker game; to them, it's The Thursday Night Game or The Game That Used To Be In Benny's Basement. If you are a newcomer to an old game, you are an ambulatory vessel of ignorance. Nothing is standardized in poker except the hierarchy of hands. Unwritten house rules are immutable, appeal to rule books useless. You need all the information you can get. So before the first hand is dealt, ask:
200050_19741101_031463.xml
article
112
112,184
Feature
[no value]
Full House at the White House
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
G. Barry Golson
American Presidents generally like to be dealt in. Ulysses Grant was probably the first to play poker while in the White House; he had a reputation as a pretty savage penny-ante player during the sober stretches of his Administration. Other Chief Executives through history have admitted to raking in occasional pots, although Franklin Roosevelt is supposed to have lost more often than not. His Vice-President, "Cactus Jack" Garner, used to beat him consistently, a problem F.D.R. solved rather neatly by dropping him from the ticket as soon as he could. Harry Truman played regularly—although not as avidly as some stories have it—and sometimes won, despite a Missouri-born tendency to stay in every hand ever dealt to him. He found poker a useful political tool: When he was considering a man for an important Government post, he'd have him over for a few hands with the boys; if the man held up under poker pressure, he usually got the appointment.
200050_19741101_031464.xml
article
113
113,238,240,242,243,244
Feature
[no value]
The Algonquin Games
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Scott Meredith
Saturdays were Special at the Algonquin Hotel's Round Table, the favorite luncheon spot of New York's literary and artistic set in the Twenties and Thirties. Unlike the lunches on other days of the week, which were generally leisurely and ended with the participants' going their separate ways, the male lunchers at the Saturday sessions hurried through their meals, got rid of their (continued on page 238)Algonquin Games(continued from page 113) wives and girlfriends and moved upstairs to a small second-floor suite provided for them, free of charge, by Frank Case, owner of the hotel. The suite was the site of a weekly poker game.
200050_19741101_031465.xml
article
114
114,158,186,188,189,190,194,196,198,200
Feature
[no value]
Coming Down in Gardena
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jack Richardson
It was the diamond I saw first, a throb of white light that flashed by my eye like a comet. I had been playing poker for nearly three days, excluding eight-hour respites for sleep, and when not in a hand, I had learned to rest my eyes by letting them gaze down on the green felt of the table and look for patterns in the stains and cigarette burns that earlier players had left behind. I would raise my head only when an odd vibration in the rhythm of play called for scrutiny of the faces of those hunched about the table, faces that, like the blots and smudges on the table covering, often transpired hidden designs to an imaginative eye.
200050_19741101_031466.xml
article
114
114,116,231
Feature
[no value]
Showdown in Vegas
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Richard Warren Lewis
All the big guns were there— "Jolly Roger Funsmith," Doyle "Texas Dolly" Brunson, Jimmy "Fury" Cassella, Jack "The Tall Man" Strauss, Bobby "The Wizard" Hoff, Aubrey "All Day" Day, "Iron Man Smith" and Thomas Austin "Amarillo Slim" Preston, Jr. Months of ballyhoo promoting the world's richest poker tournament had attracted 16 contestants to a claustrophobic alcove at Binion's Horseshoe Casino in downtown Las Vegas, most of them professional gamblers with Runyonesque pedigrees. Each was risking a $10,000 stake for the $160,000 prize waiting at the conclusion of the fifth annual winner-take-all marathon. They were playing a variation of seven-card stud called hold 'em, in which each player receives two down cards—on which he may bet or check—then three common cards dealt face up in the center of the table that provoke a second betting interval, followed by a fourth card face up and more betting and, finally, a fifth card face up and one more opportunity to bet. Winning hands were determined by combining any three of the five exposed cards with the two cards in the hole. It was a no-limit game that encouraged healthy wagers, while relying upon total concentration, sufficient stamina to endure grueling seven-P.M.-to-three-A.M. sessions and—most importantly—the critical ability to know how and when to bluff.
200050_19741101_031467.xml
pictorial
115
115
Photo Essay
[no value]
New Deals
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031468.xml
article
115
115
News
[no value]
Never, Never Fold
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jim Murray
I hate to brag, but back in my single days, I was one of the most feared men with a deck of cards in the country. "Jacks-or-Better" Jim I was known as, the scourge of every nickel-quarter game in the Connecticut Valley, the undisputed king of dormitory lowball and the man who, singlehandedly, broke the bank of my sister, Betty, in the Sunday-night table-stakes games where as many as 100 pennies would change hands on a single deal. Here, then, are the ten secrets of my success:
200050_19741101_031469.xml
article
117
117
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Edmond Kiraz
[no value]
200050_19741101_031470.xml
pictorial
119
118,119,120,121,122,123,124-126,127
Playmate
[no value]
Bebe Buell, Miss November, 1974
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Richard Fegley
Bebe Buell had just come to New York from the South and had met a young man who owned a recording studio. "He must have thought I was great," she recalls. "He hung photographs of me all over his studio." And everyone who passed through the studio—recording engineers, producers, musicians—saw the pictures. One day, a musician friend of the studio owner met the girl in the photographs. His name was Todd Rundgren. "At the time," Bebe remembers, "Todd had just released his second album. But I had no idea who he was. Anyway, we talked, went out a couple of times and soon we were living together." That was nearly three years ago, and though the photographs are gone from the walls of the recording studio, some of New York's finest fashion photographers are taking new ones of Bebe all the time. "I model," she explains, "because I like to accomplish things. It would be easy for me to just hang around with Todd and do nothing but blab on the phone all day while shining the furniture and his four gold records lying around our house. But I like to be independent. I want to have my own career, my own identity." While Bebe has busied herself with that, Rundgren has gone on to become one of the most accomplished writers and producers of rock (his last single, Hello, It's Me, was nearly a 1,000,000 seller). Bebe still travels with him, though, when he and his band, Utopia, go on tour. But because her talents are in great demand by photographers, agencies and fashion magazines (on a typical nonshooting day, she averages enough appointments to keep her busy well into the evening), the tours and parties with good friends on the road come much less frequently. "That's kind of sad," Bebe admits, "but I don't go to as many parties as I used to, anyway, and I got tired of spending my nights being seen at high-class New York bars. I'm trying to live a healthier life. I do yoga, I've quit smoking and I haven't eaten any meat for the past year." Still, Bebe wonders on occasion whether it's all a dream. "Sometimes, when I see my picture in a magazine or watch Todd play at a concert for thousands of people, I almost have to pinch myself when I realize that less than three years ago, I was just a nobody from Virginia Beach who didn't even know that there was a Todd Rundgren or such a thing as rock culture and the lifestyle that goes along with it. One week not too long ago, for instance, Eric Clapton was in town for a concert. Todd and I were invited backstage, at which point Eric asked him to sit in. Then Mick Jagger walked into the dressing room, and later, when Todd was onstage, Mick and I talked and he said, 'Why don't you and Todd come over to my place tomorrow?' His place turned out to be Andy Warhol's summer cottage out on Montauk Point. And since then, he's phoned several times from London just to find out how we are." Bebe rarely lets all that glitter turn her around, though. "I'm too busy for that," she says. "I've got too much growing and learning to do, and I'm determined to be proud of myself." No reason you can't start now, Bebe.
200050_19741101_031471.xml
article
128
128
Humor
[no value]
Playboy's Party Jokes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A neighborhood busybody was so shocked by what she saw through a young couple's window that she marched right up, yanked it open and told them so. The occupants heatedly maintained that what they did in the privacy of their bedroom was their own business—and the other couples who were with them emphatically agreed.
200050_19741101_031472.xml
article
129
129
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Erich Sokol
[no value]
200050_19741101_031473.xml
article
130
130,131,132,133
Feature
[no value]
The Good Guys Wear Black
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robert L. Green
[no value]
200050_19741101_031474.xml
article
135
135
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
B. Kliban
[no value]
200050_19741101_031475.xml
article
136
136,137,138,142,177,178,180,182,183
Feature
[no value]
God's Big Fix
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Richard Rhodes
As far as the universe is concerned, the energy crisis is a fraud. There is no energy crisis now, there never has been, and there never will be. Dislocations, yes: massive and destructive in the past, possibly more so in the future. But there never was any shortage of energy in the universe. We knew that all along, watching the sun rise and burn and set through all the millennia of the race's evolution and never once falter, never once go out. Was there anything earlier that we wanted? Excepting only ourselves, was there anything earlier that we knew?
200050_19741101_031476.xml
article
139
139,249
Feature
[no value]
The Charm
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Ray Russell
Come close. Closer. Lean over me. Put your ear to my mouth. I'm not strong; I think I'm dying; I can barely speak. Listen carefully. At the end of this street, at the corner, on the east side, there's a small white house with a green roof. A brick path leads to the door. Snapdragons are planted along the path. You can't miss it. There's a wreath on the door—it's old and blackened and looks like an emblem of death, but don't be put off by that, it's just an old Christmas wreath, hung there many years ago and never taken down. No meaning to that, just laziness, apathy, inertia. The door is unlocked. Go in. The house is unoccupied. Nobody home. You'll see a stairway leading to (concluded on page 249)The Charm(continued from page 139) the second floor. Climb the stairs and go into the master bedroom. That's the one with the yellow-and-green-striped wallpaper. You'll see a closer. Open it. Several suits are hanging there. Look for one made of charcoal-gray hop sacking, with a lining of red silk. The jacket has two inside pockets. Left one contains a small notebook bound in black imitation leather. Do not open it and read it. For your own sake I tell you this. Burn it. Burn it in the fireplace right there in the master bedroom. Then go back to the closet and look for what's called a jump suit, not on a hanger, just on a nail in the back, behind the suits, a blue terr cloth jump suit with a broken zipper. In one of the pockets, I don't remember which, you'll find a key ring with three keys on it. Take this and walk downstairs again, to the library. In the library you'll see a gray-metal file cabinet. One of the three keys on that ring unlocks it. Try them all until you find the right one. Open the bottom drawer of the file cabinet. Disregard the folders you'll see there. Not important. Pull the drawer out as far as you can and you'll see an envelope taped to the drawer just behind the last folder. Remove it. Open it. There's another key inside. Put it in your pocket. Don't bother to lock the file cabinet again. The key opens a locker in that big bus terminal about half a mile from here—you know the one. Go to the terminal—take a cab, we don't have much time—and open the locker and take out what you find there. A package wrapped in brown paper. Looks like a book. It is, in fact. Don't open the package there. Go to the men's room and lock yourself in one of the booths—make sure you have some small change. Tear off the wrapping and open the book. You'll discover that it's hollow; the pages have been cut away to form a small compartment containing a tobacco tin. Open the tin and you'll find another locker key. Put it in your pocket. Flush the toilet once or twice to allay suspicion.Trust no one. When you leave the booth, dump the wrapping and the book and the tobacco tin into the container provided for soiled paper towels. Now you must buy a round-trip ticket to Midburg. A short trip, forty-five miles. Possibly fifty. During the bus ride, don't talk to any of the other passengers. Best thing is to pretend to be asleep, but only pretend, because you are the guardian of the key and it must not fall into any hands but yours. Be alert at all times. When you arrive at the Midburg bus terminal, go directly to the lockers and try the key you found in the book until you find the right lock. In this second locker, you'll find another package just like the first, brown paper, yes, another book. Take it to the men's room. Same routine, booth, flush the toilet,etcetera. Inside this book you'll find a rather large, rusty,old-fashioned ornamental key. Put it in your pocket. Dispose of the book and wrapping as before. Take the next bus back here. Return to the house with the snapdragons. Go down to the wine cellar. The door is locked, but the big rusty key opens it. Enter the cellar and go directly to he wine bottles. Ignore all but the white wines, the French white wines. Lift each bottle until you find one that's a fake, empty. Pull out the cork. Shake out the little key you find there. It opens a large metal strongbox you'll find in the top drawer of the file cabinet in the study—that's why I told you to leave the files open. Lock the wine cellar again when you leave it and break the key. It's very old and rusty and you should have no difficulty. Throw the broken pieces into one of the file drawers and lock the cabinet again after taking out the strongbox. Open the strongbox with the little key from the wine bottle. Inside the strongbox you'll find a smaller strongbox with a combination lock. The combination is simply the six digits of my birthday, multiplied by seven. I was born on Christmas in the year of the Great Fire. Any almanac will give you that. When you open this second strongbox, you'll see an ordinary wooden cigar box. Inside it is a photograph of me as a youth in uniform, and a photograph of a young lady in a flowered hat, and a withered carnation, and a packet of old letters tied with a lavender ribbon, and a prayer book, and a rosary, and a comb, I think, and possibly a pill bottle containing an obsolete prescription surely gone stale and useless by now, and a small pistol that's lost its firing pin. Some of these objects belonged to my mother. All of them are without any value whatsoever—except for one. And that one is beyond price. It has been with me for more years than I can tell you. In clumsy hands, it invariably causes impotence, or blindness, or insanity, or agonizing death. Sometimes all four, in that order. But used correctly, it bestows upon its owner a multitude of blessings. A sweet breath. Perfect pitch. Unfailing virility. The power to bend a dime with two fingers. X-ray vision. Invisibility at will. The gift of healing by the laying on of hands. Raising the dead. Luck at all games of chance. Ability to complete the Times crossword puzzle in under ten minutes. Power to make any woman in the world do whatever you wish. Seeing in the dark. A dazzling smile. Pleasing personality. Photographic memory. Beautiful handwriting. The gift of gab. The faculty of flight. How to lose ten pounds in two weeks without dieting. How to make friends. How to get into heaven. Power to kill with a glance. Answers to puzzling questions: riddle of the Sphinx, what song the Sirens sang, how many angels can dance on the head of a pin, what happens when an irresistible force meets an immovable object, if a tree falls on a desert island does it make any sound, is there life after death, what was Judy Garland's real name? Long-sought secret of perpetual motion. Short cuts to becoming a black belt in karate, grand master at chess, expert folder of paper airplanes, best-selling author. How to get an audience with the Pope. Repair your own television set. Turn base metals into gold. Conquer insomnia. Attain peace of mind. What happened to the lost tribes of Israel. Where to find the score of Peri's Dafne, lost for centuries, said to be the first opera. How to temper copper in the forgotten manner of the ancient Egyptians. Secret of eternal youth. Secret of immortality. Secret love rites of the Hollywood stars. How to get on the cover of Time. How to make a great cup of coffee. How to be two inches taller. How to read minds. How to foretell the future. How to swim. How to roller-skate. How to be happy. Bring the cigar box back here to me, with all its contents intact. I will then look at those items one by one until I find the one that bestows these gifts and powers, and I will bequeath it to you. Why not? It's of no use to me anymore. I'm dying. I know what you're thinking: Why am I dying if I possess the secret of immortality? Ah, why, indeed? Because I committed the sin of sins, for which no one can be forgiven. The sin without a name it's called, but it has a name no one dare utter, no one dare think. And so my magic charm has lost its power to help me. I am unworthy. Lean closer. I'm sinking fast. Can you hear me? Forget about all those keys and bus trips. Get a blowtorch, something to slice steel, go directly to the file cabinet and burn your way into the top drawer and into both strongboxes and directly to the cigar box and bring it quickly to me now. The reason you must bring it to me, the reason I can't simply tell you which of the objects in the cigar box is the magic charm, is that I don't remember. My memory is dying with my body. But if I see them, touch them, then my memory will come alive and I can give it to you and instruct you in its proper use and you will live a life of great merit and bliss. You will lead the world out of chaos and into a golden age. You will raise Eve from the dust and make her mother to a race of gods. You will, yourself, be a god. You will be God. But I must have those talismans in my fingers, because I don't remember whether it's the pistol, or the pill bottle, or the rosary, or the letters, or the lavender ribbon around the letters, or the
200050_19741101_031477.xml
article
140
140,141,208,209
Feature
[no value]
Now Playing in Your Dining Room! Super Soups of 1974!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
George Bradshaw
Soup—The Spectacular, full-bodied, this-is-all-you're-going-to-get, meal-in-itself soup—seems to have fallen on meager times. It appears to have been taken over by those gray-humored souls who make handwoven neckties and plant beans by astrology. The rest of us are lucky to get something out of a can—flavored with the carcass of an alien tomato and redolent with the savors cooked up in a test tube. It is as if the right people had said nuts to soup. A grave mistake.
200050_19741101_031478.xml
article
143
143,228,230
Humor
[no value]
Cheesecake Madness
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jim Siegelman
Do you condone moral depravity? Does your child frequent cheesecake dens? Is your fly open? Obscenity is everyone's problem....
200050_19741101_031479.xml
pictorial
144
144,145,146,147,148,149,150,151,152,153,154,155,166,168,170,173,174,175,176
Pictorial
[no value]
Sex in Cinema-1974
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Arthur Knight
If that old saw about actions speaking louder than words has any merit, the Mrs. Grundys of America—the pressure groups, legislators, judges and district attorneys who have been busily trying to enforce what they thought were local standards of taste in films—were sadly out of touch with their constituents in 1974. A sort of double standard seems to permeate our society—perhaps emanating from the top, where a President mouthed sanctimonious platitudes in public and conducted expletive-ridden vendettas in private. Never before had an American President concerned himself so directly—and vocally—with morality in the media, primarily as represented by films, television and the press, while practicing a personal morality very much his own. Nixon's "stop-the-smut" lead was assiduously followed up by the Congress, the Supreme Court, the FBI, the Postal Service, various state governments and, on the local level, by extraordinarily repressive police actions. In the wake of the June 1973 Supreme Court decisions advocating illy defined "community standards" as the basis for prosecution of obscene or pornographic movies, no fewer than 37 states, in 250 separate bills, undertook to establish just what those standards might be. Without even waiting for such clarification, police crackdowns escalated dramatically. In Fort Worth, Texas, a zealous district attorney, contending that theater seats were accessories to a crime if people sat in them to watch an X-rated movie, ordered that the seats—along with the projectors and the film—be ripped out and held as evidence. The film, of course, was Deep Throat.
200050_19741101_031480.xml
article
156
156
Cartoon
[no value]
The Vargas Girl
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Alberto Vargas
[no value]
200050_19741101_031481.xml
article
157
157
Ribald Classics
[no value]
Ribald Classic: The Last Trump
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Once There was a sultan who was exceedingly fond of his jester and wished to reward him in some pleasant way for all his good japes and sayings. So one day the sultan said, "Coelebs, I shall find a pretty girl, a jolly girl, and marry her to thee."
200050_19741101_031482.xml
article
159
159,160,161
Feature
[no value]
A Playboy Pad: Open Sesame!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
This is not your basic New York City one-bedroom high-rise apartment. Oh, it started that way—as a small, boxlike, generally uninspired structure (barracks is the word most frequently used to describe this type of accommodation) in one of those Upper East Side buildings with uniformed doormen and closed-circuit TV in the lobby. But Tony Fisher—a 30ish real-estate exec who is into art, sports cars and motorcycles (not necessarily in that order)—had other ideas. And he found an interior designer—John Saladino—with whom he could communicate. The result is a beautifully organic pad that appears much roomier than its true dimensions.
200050_19741101_031483.xml
article
162
162,163,164,165
Humor
[no value]
The Aggressive Chick
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Alden Erikson
[no value]
200050_19741101_031484.xml
advertisement
167
167
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Harper Distilling Co.
Whisky
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031485.xml
article
168
168
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Ffolkes
[no value]
200050_19741101_031486.xml
advertisement
169
169
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.
Winston
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031487.xml
article
170
170
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Bernard Handelsman
[no value]
200050_19741101_031488.xml
advertisement
171
171
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Seagram Distillers Co.
Wolfschmidt
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031489.xml
article
172
172
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Don Madden
[no value]
200050_19741101_031490.xml
advertisement
174
174
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Mennen
Deodorant
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031491.xml
advertisement
175
175
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Bath Talc
Mennen
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031492.xml
article
176
176
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Virgil Partch
[no value]
200050_19741101_031493.xml
advertisement
177
177
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Bell & Howell
Camera
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031494.xml
advertisement
179
179
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.
Vantage
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031495.xml
article
180
180
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Don Orehek
[no value]
200050_19741101_031496.xml
advertisement
181
181
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Performance Television
TV
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031497.xml
advertisement
183
183
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Vivitar
Camera
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031498.xml
article
184
184
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Shirvanian
[no value]
200050_19741101_031499.xml
advertisement
185
185
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Panasonic
Radio
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031500.xml
advertisement
187
187
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Volkswagen of America
Car
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031501.xml
article
188
188
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Alden Erikson
[no value]
200050_19741101_031502.xml
advertisement
WS3
WS3
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Hiram Walker & Sons Inc.
Whisky
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031503.xml
advertisement
WS4
WS4
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gallery
Gallery
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031504.xml
advertisement
WS4
WS4
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Equinox
Equinox
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031505.xml
article
189
189
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Howard Shoemaker
[no value]
200050_19741101_031506.xml
article
191
191
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Buck Brown
[no value]
200050_19741101_031507.xml
advertisement
192
192,193
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
James B. Lansing Sound, Inc.
Speaker
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031508.xml
article
194
194
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
George Booth
[no value]
200050_19741101_031509.xml
advertisement
195
195
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
James B. Beam Distilling Co.
Whisky
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031510.xml
advertisement
197
197
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
After Six Accessories
After Six
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031511.xml
advertisement
199
199
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Wide World of entertainment
Entertainment
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031512.xml
advertisement
201
201
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jack Daneil Distillery
Whisky
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031513.xml
article
202
202
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gahan Wilson
[no value]
200050_19741101_031514.xml
article
203
203
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Bernard Handelsman
[no value]
200050_19741101_031515.xml
article
205
205
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Raymonde
[no value]
200050_19741101_031516.xml
article
206
206,207
News
[no value]
Playboy Potpourri
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Hats Aplenty
200050_19741101_031517.xml
advertisement
209
209
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dexter Shoe Company
Shoe
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031518.xml
advertisement
211
211
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Equinox
Calculator
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031519.xml
advertisement
211
211
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Nuform
Sensi Shape
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031520.xml
article
212
212
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Interlandi
[no value]
200050_19741101_031521.xml
advertisement
213
213
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Skoal
Skoal
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031522.xml
article
214
214
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Hoest
[no value]
200050_19741101_031523.xml
advertisement
215
215
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Schenley Imports Co.
Ole Tequila
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031524.xml
advertisement
217
217
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Ortho Pharmaceutical Corporation
Conceptrol Shields
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031525.xml
advertisement
218
218,219
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy Book Club
Book
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031526.xml
article
221
221
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Dempsey
[no value]
200050_19741101_031527.xml
advertisement
223
223
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
Camel
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031528.xml
article
224
224
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Leo Garel
[no value]
200050_19741101_031529.xml
advertisement
225
225
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Another fine Product
Gaf
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031530.xml
advertisement
226A
226A
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Leroux
Chocolate Bar
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031531.xml
advertisement
226B
226B
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Seagram Distillers Company
Whisky
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031532.xml
article
229
229
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dink Siegel
[no value]
200050_19741101_031533.xml
article
230
230
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Malcolm Hancock
[no value]
200050_19741101_031534.xml
advertisement
231
231
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Tareyton 100's
Cigarettes
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031535.xml
article
232
232
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Interlandi
[no value]
200050_19741101_031536.xml
advertisement
233
233
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Fleischmann Distilling Corp.
Dry Gin
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031537.xml
article
235
235
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gahan Wilson
[no value]
200050_19741101_031538.xml
article
236
236
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Don Addis
[no value]
200050_19741101_031539.xml
advertisement
237
237
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Seagram Distillers Company
Whisky
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031540.xml
article
238
238
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
B. Kliban
[no value]
200050_19741101_031541.xml
advertisement
239
239
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031542.xml
article
241
241
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Francis Wilford-Smith
[no value]
200050_19741101_031543.xml
advertisement
243
243
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Seagram Distillers Company
Seagram's Extra Dry Gin
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031544.xml
article
244
244
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Sidney Harris
[no value]
200050_19741101_031545.xml
advertisement
245
245
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031546.xml
article
247
247
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Buck Brown
[no value]
200050_19741101_031547.xml
advertisement
248
248
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Avant Garde
Avant Garde
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031548.xml
advertisement
250
250
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031549.xml
advertisement
250
250
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031550.xml
advertisement
C3
C3
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Blended Canadian Whisky
Whisky
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031551.xml
advertisement
C4
C4
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Pall Mail
Cigarettes
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031552.xml
advertisement
20
20
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
New York Dolls Concert
New York Dolls Concert
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19741101_031553.xml