Issue: 19730301

Thursday, March 1, 1973
000231
March
3
True
20
Monday, July 14, 2014
8/4/2016 12:35:19 AM

Articles
cover
C1
C1
Cover
[no value]
Cover Description
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[The following text appears on the cover]
200050_19730301_028034.xml
advertisement
C2
C2
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Seagram Distillers Company
Whisky
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028035.xml
advertisement
1
1
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Sony Corp. of America
Sony
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028036.xml
advertisement
2
2
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Chanel
Perfume
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028037.xml
article
3
3
From the Editor
[no value]
Playbill
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Midwifing Authors through the sometimes anguishing labor of writing is what we do for a living. It can be frustrating, satisfying and occasionally even deeply rewarding work. But seldom do we have a chance to play a role—if only as a catalyst—in turning a writer's life around, helping him make a fresh start. It may be too early to say, but we think that's just what happened when we assigned Bob Jennings to write Home? Which Way Is That? But let him tell it:
200050_19730301_028038.xml
masthead
4
4
Copyright
[no value]
Address_Copyright_Credit
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
General Offices: Playboy Building, 919 North Michigan Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60611. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, drawings and photographs submitted if they are to be returned and no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited materials. All Rights in letters sent to Playboy will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication and Copyright purposes and as subject to Playboy's unrestricted Right to edit and to comment editorially. Contents copyright © 1973 by Playboy. All Rights reserved. Playboy and Rabbit Head symbol are marks of Playboy, Registered U. S. Patent Office, Marca Registrada, Marque deposee. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without writtern permission from the publisher. Any similarity between the people and places in the fiction and semifiction in this magazine and any real people and places is purely coincidental. Credits: Cover: Model Bunny-Playmate Mercy Rooney, designed by Tom Staebler, photography by Dwight Hooker. Other photography by: David Chan, P. 3 (2); Arthur Ellis, P. 3; Ron Emmons, P. 107; Ken Frantz, P. 3; Robert Heinz, P. 3; Evelyn Hofer, P. 3; Richard Howard/Camera 5, P. 55; Carl Iri, P. 3; Clemens Kalisher, P. 3; Dave Kennerly, P. 3; C. Dick Norton, P. 3; Suzanne Seed, P. 3; Vernon L. Smith, P. 3 (3); Mel Victor, P. 3; Baron Wolman, P. 3.
200050_19730301_028039.xml
tableOfContents
4
4
Table of Contents
[no value]
Contents for the Men's Entertainment Magazine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playbill .................................................................... 3
200050_19730301_028040.xml
advertisement
5
5
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gordon's Dry Gin Co., Ltd.
Distilled London Dry Gin
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028041.xml
advertisement
6
6
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Hitachi
Radio
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028042.xml
masthead
6
6
Masthead
[no value]
Masthead
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Hugh M. Hefnereditor and publisher
200050_19730301_028043.xml
advertisement
7
7
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
S.C. Jonson & Son
Edge
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028044.xml
advertisement
8
8,9
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Blue Bell, Inc.
Wrangler Sportswear
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028045.xml
advertisement
10
10
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Chrylser Motor Corporation
Car
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028046.xml
advertisement
11
11
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Old Spice
Stick Deodorant
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028047.xml
article
11
11,12,14
Letters to the Editor
[no value]
Dear Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Address Playboy Magazine • Playboy Building, 919 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60611
200050_19730301_028048.xml
other
11
11
Indicia
[no value]
Indicia
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy, March, 1973, Volume 20, Number 3. Published monthly by Playboy, Playboy Building, 919 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60611. Subscriptions: In the United States, its possessions and Canada, $24 for three years, $18 for two years, $10 for one year. Elsewhere Add $2 per year for Foreign Postage. Allow 30 days for new subscriptions and renewals. Change of Address: Send both old and new addresses to Playboy. Playboy Building, 919 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60611, and allow 30 days for change. Marketing: Robert A. Gutwillig, Marketing Director; Nelson Futch, Marketing Manager; Michael Rich, Promotion Director; Lee Gottlieb, Director of Public Relations. Advertising: Howard W. Lederer, Advertising Director; Jules Kase, Joseph Guenther, Associate Advertising Managers, 405 Park Avenue, New York, New York 10022; Sherman Keats, Chicago Manager, 919 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60611; Detroit, William F. Moore, Manager, 818 Fisher Building; Los Angeles, Stanley L. Perkins, Manager, 8721 Beverly Boulevard: San Francisco, Robert E. Stephens, Manager, 110 Sutter Street; Southeastern Representative, Pirnie & Brown, 3108 Piedmont Road, N. E., Atlanta, Georgia 30305.
200050_19730301_028049.xml
advertisement
13
13
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Tareyton
Cigarette
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028050.xml
advertisement
15
15
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Bacardi & Ltd.
Bacardi
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028051.xml
advertisement
16
16,17
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Columbia House
Records
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028052.xml
advertisement
18
18
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Blended Canadian Whisky
Whisky
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028053.xml
review
19
19,20
Review
[no value]
Playboy After Hours
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Score one for mother nature: Los Angeles County plans to uproot $50,000 worth of plastic trees and plants that have been set out along roadsides in San Pablo. As a county spokesman put it: "Artificial plants are not durable enough." They will be replaced with the real thing.
200050_19730301_028054.xml
review
20
20,22
Review-Books
[no value]
Books
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Previews: Robbers and cops are the rage this season as publishers attempt to cash in on the interest stirred up by such good sellers as Peter Maas's The Valachi Papers and Gay Talese's Honor Thy Father. One Vincent Teresa, billed as "the first high-ranking Mafia man to break the code of silence," is the author, more or less, of My Life in the Mafia, which Doubleday will publish next month. His accomplice is writer Thomas C. Renner. Teresa, a New England mafioso, decided to tell all while in jail in 1969 because his pals outside stole $4,000,000 from his family—or so he says. In case you're wondering, the fledgling author is now in hiding, protected by the Feds against assassins who—he says—have been offered a $500,000 contract on his life.
200050_19730301_028055.xml
advertisement
21
21
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Brown & Williamson Tabacco Corp.
Kool
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028056.xml
review
22
22,26,28,32,33
Review-Films
[no value]
Movies
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Previews: Reprises and spin-offs of last season's hits will dominate the movie scene for spring and summer. If at first you succeed, try and try again is a cherished belief that explains why Paramount has reached the blueprint stage with a project tentatively titled The Godfather, Part II (script by Mario Puzo, direction by Francis Ford Coppola, starring Al Pacino—and dickering with Brando), while the boys over at 20th Century-Fox mull another potential bonanza called French Connection II, with Gene Hackman and Jean-Paul Belmondo. And Warner Bros, will try for a parlay with the imminent release of Scarecrow, which has Hackman and Pacino teamed as a couple of road-running bums.
200050_19730301_028057.xml
advertisement
23
23
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jatzen Inc.
Jantzen
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028058.xml
advertisement
24
24,25
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Literary Guild
Books
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028059.xml
advertisement
27
27
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Bank America Service Corp.
Money
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028060.xml
advertisement
29
29
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Media Sampling Corp.
Media Sampling
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028061.xml
advertisement
30
30,31
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Marlboro
Cigarette
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028062.xml
advertisement
32
32
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BSR
Records
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028063.xml
advertisement
32
32
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy Clubs International
Playboy Clubs
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028064.xml
advertisement
33
33
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Binaca
Binaca
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028065.xml
review
33
33,34
Review-Recorded Music
[no value]
Recordings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"Man, is he clean," said a musician friend of ours when he checked out the cover of I'm Still in Love with You (Hi), with its picture of Al Green in an immaculate white outfit, sitting in a white cane chair in a white-walled and whitecarpeted room. The music inside is every bit as clean. Tasteful strings, added to the rich, deliberate strokes of the Willie Mitchell band, give a Ray Charlesian touch to I'm Glad You're Mine, Simply Beautiful and One of These Good Old Days; Love and Happiness is velvet funk, with blues and Gospel touches; Oh, Pretty Woman is the old Roy Orbison hit (updated, of course); Look What You Done for Me and the title tune will be familiar to anyone who's listened to a pop radio station during the past year. An overlong version of Kristofferson's For the Good Times is the only thing that really doesn't work. And, if you've paid much attention to the lyrics, you might get a little dragged, because A.G. doesn't write about anything except romantic love (although he does write about it pretty well). That won't be any obstacle, though, because the man's singing, to quote his own song title, is simple beautiful. And if Mitchell and cohorts ever played an ill-advised note, you can be sure it didn't come out on a record.
200050_19730301_028066.xml
review
34
34,36
Review-Theatre
[no value]
Theater
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Previews: Undeterred by the musical wreckage that visited Broadway during the first half of the 1972-1973 season, producers are again sailing confidently into musical combat. One of the more promising launchings ought to be A Little Night Music, which derives from Ingmar Bergman's Smiles of a Summer Night. This sunshiny comic movie, a rarity for Bergman, has been adapted to the stage by Hugh Wheeler, with songs added by Stephen Sondheim. Harold Prince will produce and direct a cast headed by Hermione Gingold and Glynis Johns. Christopher Plummer will flex his vocal cords in a musical version of Cyrano de Bergerac, shortened for Broadway to Cyrano. Anthony Burgess is responsible for the adaptation and lyrics and Michael Langham for the direction. Lainie Kazan and Ken Howard will be the two for the Seesaw in the musical expansion of William Gibson's two-character play. E. Y. Harburg's What a Day for a Miracle—about the 13th Century Children's Crusade—is also on the spring schedule.
200050_19730301_028067.xml
advertisement
35
35
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
3M Company
Cassette
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028068.xml
advertisement
37
37
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Bevis Industries Inc.
Knife
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028069.xml
advertisement
38
38
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
British Leyland And Motors Inc.
Car
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028070.xml
advertisement
39
39
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Empire Scientific Corp.
Empire
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028071.xml
article
39
39,40
Reader QA
[no value]
The Playboy Advisor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
My college roommate, a physics major, has a theory that natural resonance frequencies occur during sexual intercourse—that the rhythmic vibrations produced when the height of sex is sustained could coincide with a girl's natural resonance frequency and give her violently painful muscle spasms. I'm curious, but I wouldn't want to inflict pain on my girl. How can I test the theory?—R. B., Los Angeles, California.
200050_19730301_028072.xml
advertisement
41
41
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028073.xml
advertisement
42
42,43
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Toyoto
Car
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028074.xml
advertisement
44
44
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.
Winston
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028075.xml
article
45
45,46,47,48,50,51,52,54
Reader Discussion
[no value]
The Playboy Forum
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Amnesty
200050_19730301_028076.xml
advertisement
45
45
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy-Club-Hotel
Playboy Club Hotel
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028077.xml
article
46
46,47
Reader Discussion
[no value]
Forum Newsfront
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Grass Grows Greener
200050_19730301_028078.xml
advertisement
48
48
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Swank, Inc.
Espada
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028079.xml
advertisement
49
49
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aetna
Life Casualty
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028080.xml
advertisement
50
50
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Pioneer
Music
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028081.xml
advertisement
EA1
EA1
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Schieffelin & Co.
Teacher's
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028082.xml
advertisement
EA2
EA2
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Noel Industries Inc.
Live Ins
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028083.xml
advertisement
51
51
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Pharmacraft Division Pennwalt Corporation
Desenex
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028084.xml
advertisement
51
51
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Yashica, Inc.
Camera
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028085.xml
advertisement
53
53
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Silva Thins
Cigarette
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028086.xml
advertisement
54
54
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Blended Sotch Whisky
Ballantine's
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028087.xml
advertisement
54
54
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
3M Company
Wollensak
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028088.xml
advertisement
55
55
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Shimano American Corporation
Shimano
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028089.xml
advertisement
56
56,57
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Record Club of America
Records
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028090.xml
advertisement
58
58
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Sylvania
Radio
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028091.xml
article
59
59,60,61,62,66,68,70,74
Playboy Interview
[no value]
Joe Frazier
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"He is going to make a lot of money, he is going to be the champion for a long time and he is a mean guy to tangle with." Those were some of the conclusions reached by boxer-astrologer Henry Hank when he studied Joe Frazier's horoscope in the June 1970 issue of The Ring. It seems to be the age of Capricorn among heavyweight boxers, for the goat is not only the world champion's sign but also that of exchamp Muhammad Ali, a.k.a. Cassius Clay, who lost a 15-round title fight to Frazier nine months after Hank's prediction—but remains the most formidable contender for Joe's title. Hank noted that the horoscopes of Frazier and Ali contain "many startling similarities." Since he won the championship, however, Frazier has been a relatively invisible celebrity, while Ali has been flamboyantly conspicuous, as always, fighting frequently and taking every occasion to complain about Frazier's inactivity, to protest that he's really the uncrowned champ and to demand purses equal to the sizable ones commanded by his archrival.
200050_19730301_028092.xml
advertisement
61
61
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A & C Saber Tips
Saber Tips
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028093.xml
advertisement
63
63
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AMC Hornet
Car
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028094.xml
advertisement
64
64,65
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Gillette Company
Blades
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028095.xml
advertisement
67
67
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Four Roses Distillers Co.
White Horse
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028096.xml
advertisement
69
69
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.
Salem
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028097.xml
advertisement
71
71
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Weather Porsche
Car
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028098.xml
advertisement
73
72,73
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Platboy Book Club
Books
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028099.xml
advertisement
75
75
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028100.xml
article
77
76,77,78,172
Feature
[no value]
The Inventory at Fontana Bella
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Tennessee Williams
In the early autumn of her 102nd year, the Principessa Lisabetta von Hohenzalt-Casalinghi was no longer able to tell light from dark, thunder from a footfall nor the texture of wool from satin. Yet she still got about with amazing agility. She danced to imaginary schottisches, polkas and waltzes with imaginary partners. She gave commands to household domestics in a voice whose volume would shame a drill sergeant. Having once been drawn through Oriental streets in rickshas, she had naturally learned to yell "Chop-chop!" and she now exercised that command to make haste at the end of each order she shouted, and these orders were given all but continually while she was awake and sometimes she would even shout "Chop-chop!" in her sleep.
200050_19730301_028101.xml
article
79
79
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Dempsey
[no value]
200050_19730301_028102.xml
pictorial
80
80,81,82,83,84,85
Pictorial
[no value]
Legends in Their Own Time
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028103.xml
article
87
86,87,90,184,185,186,187,188
Feature
[no value]
Zap! You're Normal
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Stephen H. Yafa
Before A Clockwork Orange dealt us all a tolchock in the rot, life wasn't so bad. Sure, there were riots in the Sixties and a President who conducted his affairs of state from the throne, but once we learned to live with the eccentricities of our society and the politicians who were running it, we could sit back and enjoy. Then, suddenly, we were slooshing Beethoven while being clopped about the gulliver, viddying the old ultraviolence nonstop, and that, O my brothers, was anything but horrorshow.
200050_19730301_028104.xml
article
88
88,89
News
[no value]
Top Gear
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028105.xml
article
91
91,92,94,102,165
Fiction
[no value]
The Conservationist
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Nadine Gordimer
Pale, Freckled Eggs. Swaying over the ruts to the gate of the third pasture, Sunday morning, the owner of the farm suddenly sees: a clutch of pale, freckled eggs set out before a half circle of children. Some are squatting; the one directly behind the eggs is cross-legged, like a vendor in a market. There is pride of ownership in that grin lifted shyly to the farmer's gaze. The eggs are arranged like marbles, the other children crowd round, but you can tell they are not allowed to touch unless the cross-legged one gives permission. The bare soles, the backsides of the children have flattened a nest in the long dead grass for both eggs and children. The emblem on the car's bonnet, itself made in the shape of a prismatic flash, scores his vision with a vertical-horizontal sword of dazzle. This is the place at which a child always appears, even if none has been in sight, racing across the field to open the gate for the car. But today the farmer puts on the brake, leaves the engine running and gets out. One very young boy, wearing a jersey made long ago for much longer arms but too short to cover a naked belly, runs to the gate and stands there. The others all smile proudly round the eggs. The cross-legged one (wearing a woman's dress, but it may be a boy) puts out his hands over the eggs and gently shuffles them a little closer together, letting a couple of the outer ones roll back into his palms. The eggs are a creamy buff, their glaze pored and lightly spotted, their shape more pointed than a hen's, and the palms of the small black hands are translucent-looking apricot pink. There is no sound but awed, snuffling breathing through snotty noses.
200050_19730301_028106.xml
article
93
93
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Eldon Dedini
[no value]
200050_19730301_028107.xml
article
95
95
News
[no value]
Conservative? Naturally! Dashing? Decidedly!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robert L. Green
Acclaimed for his screen interpretation of Winston Churchill's formative years, British actor Simon Ward stays in character by donning a contemporary version of a Churchillian hallmark—the three-piece suit. Shown here: a Ruben Torres–designed two-button model in wool piped with satin and featuring roped shoulders and flared leg bottoms, $250, worn with a polyester-cotton dress shirt, $20, and a silk, tie, $15, all from Allen Winston; plus a pair of oxford lace-ups, by Nunn Bush for Brass Boot, $46. Good show!
200050_19730301_028108.xml
article
96
96,97,98,99,100,101,189
Feature
[no value]
Lindner's Ladies
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Hilton Kramer
The Art of Richard Lindner is an art of the fantastic. Out of a wide experience of life—particularly urban life. With its mad, headlong, unappeased appetite for the extremes of existence—and an uncanny, painstaking power of observation, Lindner has created an art of bizarre and outrageous images. He confronts the workaday distortions and exaggerations of modern life with the graver and more hilarious hyperbole of his own imagination. He is a realist of sorts, but his art is untouched by the traditional realist obligation to report on the commonplace surfaces of life. He is, rather, a realist of the "secret life"—of all those unacknowledged fantasies and involuntary daydreams provoked by the social and erotic exacerbations of life in the maelstrom of the modern city. As a result, Lindner's art compels the spectator to be a voyeur of his own forbidden, libidinous dreams.
200050_19730301_028109.xml
article
103
103,170,171
Feature
[no value]
Cocktail Cookery
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Emanuel Greenberg
No, Cooking with Cocktails is not just a sneaky way to get bombed. Nor is it going to replace haute cuisine. While the idea may seem audacious, and certainly untraditional, there's a practical reason behind it. Spirits are storehouses of concentrated flavor—the distilled essences of corn, rye, cane, grapes and other fruit. The complexity of bourbon, for example, astonishes food analysts, who list vanilla, cumin, cereal and "buttery nutty scents" among its generous flavor endowments. Gin, brandy, rum and (continued on page 170)Cocktail Cookery(continued from page 103) hundreds of liqueurs are similarly blessed and are often used by imaginative chefs to perk up their offerings.
200050_19730301_028110.xml
article
105
104,105,216,217,218,219,220
Feature
[no value]
The Man Who Wrote My Novel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
James Lincoln Collier
Most Writers get into their line of work because they are driven by a vision, a splendid passion to do magnificent and immortal things. I, however, became a writer the way other young men go into the family business. My father, Edmund Collier, is a writer of children's books. My brother, Christopher Collier, is a historian, writer of obscure articles and author of the recent Roger Sherman's Connecticut, a book so scholarly that it costs $18.50. My brother-in-law James Buechler writes short fiction and has won a couple of O. Henry prizes. My uncle Slater Brown is a novelist, hero of E. E. Cummings' The Enormous Room, and husband of a grandniece of Henry James. My aunt, Susan Jenkins Brown, is author of a book called Robber Rocks about her friendship with the poet Hart Crane. My cousin Gwilym Slater Brown has been a staff writer for Sports Illustrated for many years. Another cousin, Sargent Collier, was a writer-photographer, and another uncle, George Zipf, was a lexicographer.
200050_19730301_028111.xml
pictorial
106
106,107,108,109,110-112,113
Playmate
[no value]
Bonnie Large, Miss March, 1973
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Bill Figge
Mel Figge
Bonnie has this weird boyfriend named Ralph whose idea of a good time is to hang around shopping centers, where he likes to greet customers—"Good evening, ma'am, that's a lovely dress you're wearing"—then shake hands, answer questions and do a commercial for some product or other. And when he talks, you listen: Ralph is an eight-and-a-half-foot robot. He and Bonnie Large, a slender but well-organized five feet, five and a half, both work for Hill-Daves Productions in Sherman Oaks, California. The company—sometimes with the assistance of name entertainers and vaudeville acts—puts on shows to entertain businessmen and help them market their wares. Bonnie's dates with Ralph—who speaks and moves with the help of a concealed accomplice who operates the remote-control buttons and the microphone—are but a small part of what she does for Hill-Daves. She handles their secretarial chores and makes occasional out-of-town trips to help set up shows. And she performs, too—as a dancer, a model and a "straight girl" for magician Chuck Jones. In their act, Bonnie floats through space—not with the greatest of ease, perhaps, but convincingly—and in another routine, she gets sawed in half. After getting herself back together, Bonnie hops into her Beetle for the 45-minute drive back to her apartment in Alhambra. "It's nothing fancy," she says, but it's distinguished by the numerous antiques Bonnie has collected at local thrift shops and "swap-ins"; among them are a four-poster bed and a pre-1900 Singer sewing machine. A confirmed animal lover who once worked as a veterinarian's assistant, Bonnie also keeps a variety of pets: two great Danes, three cats and a gopher snake who stays safely locked in his tank. Because her job is as demanding as it is exhilarating, Bonnie has had to shelve plans to take night courses in shorthand and industrial drawing this year. She'd like to do more modeling, though. In 1969 she was a finalist in the competition for the court of the Rose Queen but was disqualified when the officials learned that she was too young. "I'd been told that they made exceptions," she says, "but they didn't make one in my case." Now Bonnie hopes that her Playmate appearance will inspire some modeling offers. We'd bet on that—but, of course, we're a little biased.
200050_19730301_028112.xml
article
114
114
Humor
[no value]
Playboy's Party Jokes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A tourist was propositioned in London one night. When he replied that his funds were low, the streetwalker suggested an 'arf-a-quid stand-up in a nearby darkened doorway. The man agreed with some misgivings, and then froze after a brief period of inconvenient activity. "Wot's the matter, dearie?" asked the tart.
200050_19730301_028113.xml
article
115
115
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Raymonde
[no value]
200050_19730301_028114.xml
article
117
116,117,118,152,154,156,158,161,162,163,164
Feature
[no value]
Home? Which Way is that?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. Robert Jennings
Going home: The very words have a special American resonance, a complex reverberation involving the emotions as nothing else ever does. They immerse the mind in shadow and substance, myth and reality and, over all, the tricky maunderings of memory, the unstoppable insult of time. Cutthroat time.
200050_19730301_028115.xml
article
119
119,168,169
Feature
[no value]
...Lore and Lure
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jon Bradshaw
Aficionados like to refer to backgammon as "the king of games, the game of kings," conferring some loose nobility on what might otherwise be considered a rather common game of chance. Though tradition confirms the game's kingly associations (Nero played backgammon, as did the Romanoffs; and Caligula is said to have been an inveterate cheat), backgammon is more apt to be played these days by what used to be called the idle rich—and by what passes today for a kind of instant elite—the international film and money sets. It has always been a big-money game, and since it can be played almost any where, it has become the perfect portable parlor game of the well to do.
200050_19730301_028116.xml
article
120
120,121,122,166,167,168
Feature
[no value]
...Secrets and Subtleties
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Michael Laurence
Among the games people play, backgammon is a unique combination of the very old and the very contemporary. While the game itself dates back thousands of years (backgammon boards were found in King Tut's tomb), the modern gambling version was developed only a generation ago. The manner in which backgammon is currently played evolved only in the past ten years, and the evolution is continuing. Prior to the introduction in the Twenties of a doubling feature, the game was hardly more than an obscure relative of Parcheesi, played in British clubs and by natives of the Baltic and Mediterranean regions, where it has been popular for millennia. The doubling feature (described below) made it a gambling game par excellence. As time passed, the game naturally attracted gamblers par excellence. These gentlemen (and ladies), most of whom are still alive, playing and prosperous, re-examined the game and initiated an entirely new style of play, based on game and probability theories, which, while their basics have been known since Pascal, were seriously investigated only after World War Two. The connection has never been established, but the parallels between the evolution of contemporary backgammon and the development of the high-speed computer are too striking to ignore.
200050_19730301_028117.xml
article
122
122,123
Feature
[no value]
...Games and Gear
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028118.xml
article
125
124,125,126,146,190,191,192,194,195,196,197,198,200,202,203,204,206,208
Feature
[no value]
The Digger's Game
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
George V. Higgins
Concluding a new crime novel
200050_19730301_028119.xml
article
127
127,128,129
Feature
[no value]
The Rainbreakers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robert L. Green
[no value]
200050_19730301_028120.xml
article
130
130,131,132,134,142,208,209,210,211,212,213,214
Feature
[no value]
Going Back to the Nation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Reg Potterton
The Question on the customs form was, at first glance, rather puzzling. "Do you have any semen to declare?" Perhaps it was because I had just spent 24 hours or so strapped into the seat of the aircraft and my mind was numb from the experience. My immediate reaction was to assume that someone had hit upon a novel if unorthodox solution to the Australian problem of underpopulation. I imagined for a moment that we would be led into cubicles when we landed and there, under the scrutiny of state geneticists, we would be mated with specimen bottles. Then I read the form again and realized they meant animal semen, so I wrote no and tightened the seat belt. A sunlit tapestry of red roofs and greenery, bordered on the east with yellow beaches and the deep-blue expanse of the Pacific, tilted beneath our wings; we were over the suburbs of Sydney—the first city we had seen since crossing the continent at a point about 2000 miles to the northwest.
200050_19730301_028121.xml
article
133
133
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Edmond Kiraz
[no value]
200050_19730301_028122.xml
pictorial
135
135,136,137,138,139,140,141
Pictorial
[no value]
All About Edy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Moviemaker Russ Meyer, whose Blacksnake is just out, is shooting his 24th film: Foxy, a sequel to the skin-flick classic Vixen. Foxy will star Meyer's wife, Edy Williams—whom he met at 20th Century-Fox while directing her in Beyond the Valley of the Dolls. "What I do best is parody," says Meyer, "and Foxy will be an irreverent put-on, in the style of All in the Family." Edy, as Foxy, will play "a sexy record-company executive who gets mixed up with a number of men in outrageous situations. They'll be involved with oceanography, boxing, World War One aircraft, wrestling, cross-country motorcycling and voyeurism." Meyer has such a good thing going, he figures, that he has incorporated a sneak preview of Foxy (starring Edy skinny-skiing) right into Blacksnake—something of a milestone in Hollywood promoannals. "This will be my first frontal-nudity film," says Meyer. "There will be plenty of sex, but it will be done in an R fashion—which yesteryear was X." Edy chimes in, "We're making Foxy R-rated because the only people really interested in sex are under 18. Why lock them out? We're going to give people their money's worth." The photos here hint at what's in store.
200050_19730301_028123.xml
article
143
143,150,173,174,176,180,182,183
Feature
[no value]
Let's Make A Deal
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Saul Braun
The dealers are eating apples at Riverboat Joe's in Monroe, New York. Riverboat Joe Dierna left the city four years ago to set up an Upstate real-estate brokerage office. He hands out shiny Delicious and they start munching: Elliott Weiner, who is Walter Schneider's country lawyer; Ed Kourt, who is Walter Schneider's financial officer; and Walter Schneider himself, who is a very big dealer. He is, shall we say, preoccupied. He has offered half a million dollars—all cash—to Hob Schoonmaker, and Schoonmaker has turned him down. Schneider's mind is working clicketyclack. If he revs it up any more, the gears will strip.
200050_19730301_028124.xml
article
144
144
Cartoon
[no value]
The Vargas Girl
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Alberto Vargas
[no value]
200050_19730301_028125.xml
article
145
145
Ribald Classics
[no value]
Ribald Classic: Up the Chimney
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
At the first alarm, she willed Cornelio to mount into a narrow chimney, where, being denied scope to sit or lean for his ease, he stood upright upon a bar of iron rammed with stone and mortar into the masonry; where, having his drawn sword in his hand, he resembled the image of some naked Jupiter holding a thunderbolt in his fingers. And Plaudina, ready of wit in extremity, descended into the courtyard with the keys of the house in her hand to seek out the captain of the watch that was making such a roar within her gates. Finding him, she began to reprehend his dealing with many waspish words, demanding why he came at so indecent an hour and in unseemly order to break open the doors of her husband's palace and to abuse his reputation in his absence.
200050_19730301_028126.xml
article
147
147,148,149
Feature
[no value]
"Evil" Doings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Best Thing about A Name for Evil, a recently released film starring Robert Culp and Samantha Eggar, is its scenery—breath-taking mountain country and amply exposed anatomies. The screenplay is so convoluted that it's unlikely to advance the careers of either Culp or Miss Eggar, who plays his screen wife, but it has already done something for a movie newcomer, co-star Sheila Sullivan: She's since become Mrs. Culp. In the film, Miss Sullivan plays Luanna, a rural nymphet who meets architect John Blake (Culp) at a village square dance cum orgy—which may or may not have been a dream. For reasons not made entirely clear, Blake doesn't score with his wife in the sack; the screen synopsis implies he's impotent, while the movie itself hints that the problem is his ball-breaking spouse. Black and a Luanna, however, make it famously, both in a woodsy dell and underwater at the foot of a cascade—amazingly, without benefit of snorkels. Miss Sullivan's performance, her first in a movie, is considerably more prepossessing than her showbiz debut some years ago—as an usherette at Carnegie Hall. Later, however, she landed some plum Broadway roles—in Golden Boy and Play It Again, Sam, among others—before heading for Hollywood. Her second film, already out, is Hickey and Boggs, with Culp and his old I Spy sidekick, Bill Cosby; that, at least, had a better plot. This one is a ghost story about a man who, to quote the production notes, "flees the commercial coral reef by taking his wife to settle in an isolated, broken-down Southern mansion left to him by a great-great-grandfather." For his Southern mansion of the 1800s, producer Reed Sherman picked what looks like an abandoned Pacific Northwest tourist lodge, circa 1915, in the mountains of British Columbia. It was built before World War One as an escape sanctuary for Kaiser Wilhelm, who never got to use it. It's supposed to be haunted not by the Kaiser but by Blake's ancestor, whose evil presence induces Blake to kill his wife. Or does he? Frankly, we're not sure. But, like we said, you'll enjoy the scenery.
200050_19730301_028127.xml
article
151
151
Illustration
[no value]
Word Play
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robert Carola
[no value]
200050_19730301_028128.xml
advertisement
153
153
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Somerest Importers, Ltd.
Johnnie Walker
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028129.xml
article
155
155
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Alden Erikson
[no value]
200050_19730301_028130.xml
advertisement
157
157
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.
Camel
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028131.xml
advertisement
159
159
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Rums of Puerto Rico
Puerto Rican Rum
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028132.xml
article
160
160
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
B. Kliban
[no value]
200050_19730301_028133.xml
advertisement
163
163
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Youngs Drug Products Corp.
Trojans
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028134.xml
article
164
164
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Rowland B. Wilson
[no value]
200050_19730301_028135.xml
article
165
165
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gahan Wilson
[no value]
200050_19730301_028136.xml
article
167
167
News
[no value]
Big-Time Backgammon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
If one person can be described as the best backgammon player in the world, that man is Tim Holland. He has won more major tournaments than anyone else, and his contributions to the theory of backgammon, especially in its probability aspects, have transformed the game. Holland lives in New York but spends most of his time traveling around the world playing backgammon. We recently caught him at a tournament and talked him into providing these five pointers for pros. They won't mean much to you unless you're a bona fide backgammon freak, but if you are, they might help you cut into Holland's income.
200050_19730301_028137.xml
article
168
168
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Bernard Handelsman
[no value]
200050_19730301_028138.xml
article
169
169
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
O'Brian
[no value]
200050_19730301_028139.xml
advertisement
170
170
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Brut
Faberge
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028140.xml
advertisement
171
171
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Brut
Faberge
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028141.xml
article
172
172
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Lee Lorenz
[no value]
200050_19730301_028142.xml
advertisement
EA3
EA3
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Hiram Walker & Sons, Inc.
Whisky
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028143.xml
advertisement
EA4
EA4
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
McKesson Liquor Co.
Liquore Galliano
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028144.xml
article
173
173
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robert Censoni
[no value]
200050_19730301_028145.xml
article
175
175
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dink Siegel
[no value]
200050_19730301_028146.xml
advertisement
177
177
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Seagram Distillers Co.
Whisky
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028147.xml
article
178
178,179
News
[no value]
Playboy Potpourri
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robing the Rich
200050_19730301_028148.xml
article
181
181
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gahan Wilson
[no value]
200050_19730301_028149.xml
article
183
183
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Bruce Cochran
[no value]
200050_19730301_028150.xml
article
185
185
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Malcolm Hancock
[no value]
200050_19730301_028151.xml
article
187
187
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Dempsey
[no value]
200050_19730301_028152.xml
advertisement
189
189
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Wella Corp.
Shampoo
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028153.xml
article
190
190
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
George Booth
[no value]
200050_19730301_028154.xml
article
191
191
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Howard Shoemaker
[no value]
200050_19730301_028155.xml
article
193
193
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Doug Sneyd
[no value]
200050_19730301_028156.xml
advertisement
194
194,195
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Chrysler Motor Corporation
Dodge
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028157.xml
article
196
196
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Bruce Cochran
[no value]
200050_19730301_028158.xml
article
197
197
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Sidney Harris
[no value]
200050_19730301_028159.xml
advertisement
199
199
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy Clubs International, Inc.
Playboy Clubs
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028160.xml
advertisement
201
201
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Air Force
Air Force
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028161.xml
advertisement
203
203
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Deringer
Deringer
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028162.xml
advertisement
205
205
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Peter Max Enterprises, Inc.
Datsun
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028163.xml
article
207
207
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Ffolkes
[no value]
200050_19730301_028164.xml
article
208
208
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Joseph Farris
[no value]
200050_19730301_028165.xml
article
209
209
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Hoest
[no value]
200050_19730301_028166.xml
article
210
210
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Ffolkes
[no value]
200050_19730301_028167.xml
article
213
213
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Sheridan
[no value]
200050_19730301_028168.xml
advertisement
215
215
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Lorillard
Kent
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028169.xml
article
217
217
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W.M. Hamilton
[no value]
200050_19730301_028170.xml
article
218
218
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
B. Kliban
[no value]
200050_19730301_028171.xml
advertisement
219
219
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028172.xml
article
221
221
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Francis Wilford-Smith
[no value]
200050_19730301_028173.xml
advertisement
222
222
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028174.xml
article
222
222
[no value]
[no value]
Next Month
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"Killer"—a pro with 38 notches on his .38 tells what it's like to murder on contract, naming names (but not his own)—by "Joey" and Dave Fisher
200050_19730301_028175.xml
advertisement
C3
C3
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Schenley Imports Co.
White Label
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028176.xml
advertisement
C4
C4
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp.
Viceroy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19730301_028177.xml