Issue: 19711201

Wednesday, December 1, 1971
000216
December
12
True
18
Monday, July 14, 2014
8/4/2016 12:44:37 AM

Articles
cover
C1
C1
Cover
[no value]
Cover Description
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[The following text appears on the cover]
200050_19711201_025460.xml
advertisement
C2
C2
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Buckingham Corporation.
Whisky
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025461.xml
advertisement
1
1
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Ronson Corp, U.S.A.
Discover
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025462.xml
advertisement
2
2
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Polaroid
Camera
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025463.xml
article
3
3,4
From the Editor
[no value]
Playbill
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Not too long ago, during a one-week period, there were more Americans killed by gunfire in New York City than in South Vietnam. What's most surprising about that statistic is the fact that nobody seemed surprised by it--perhaps because New York and South Vietnam have been growing more and more alike for so long now. New York had junkies first, but Saigon led the way in terrorist bombings. Manhattan may have fallen behind in racial incidents, but not by much. While fraggings run ahead of police murders, that may only be an indication of how easy it is to accomplish the former. Since any war zone is interesting in a macabre sort of way--and New York is particularly so because, if for no other reason, the casualties are so articulate--we asked for reports from the front. Bruce Jay Friedman, one of New York's foremost paranoids, a gifted and prolific writer of novels (Stern, A Mother's Kisses), plays (Scuba Duba), screenplays and articles, sent us New York--A Town Without Foreplay, which details the peculiar and somewhat attractive insanity of that city. Murray Kempton, one of Manhattan's best columnists and most civilized of men, recently had a personal run-in with crime in the streets that shook him, spiritually more than physically. My Last Mugging was, for Kempton, a holdup with an urban message.
200050_19711201_025464.xml
advertisement
5
5
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Mercury
Car
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025465.xml
masthead
6
6
Copyright
[no value]
Address_Copyright_Credit
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
General Offices: Playboy Building, 919 North Michigan Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60611. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, drawings and photographs submitted if they are to be returned and no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited materials. All rights in letters sent to Playboy will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication and copyright purposes and as subject to Playboy's unrestricted right to edit and to comment editorially. Contents Copyright © 1971 by Playboy. All Rights Reserved. Playboy and Rabbit Head symbol are marks of Playboy, registered U. S. Patent Office, Marca Registrada, Marque Deposee. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. Any similarity between the people and places in the fiction and semifiction in this magazine and any real people and places is purely coincidental. Illustrated by Kerig Pope. Photography by: Gene Anthony, p. 3; Bill Arsenault, p. 3, 195-199; Don Azuma, p. 149-157; Joel Baldwin, p. 141; The Bettmann Archive, p. 132-133 (3); Mario Casilli, p. 183; David Chan, p. 3, 4 (2), 165; Alan Clifton, p. 93; Culver pictures, p. 132-133 (2); Richard Fegley, p. 226-227, 246-247 (6); Jean Ferrero, p. 4; Dwight Hooker, p. 166; Carl Iri, p. 3; Art Kane, p. 138; Douglas Kirkland, p. 140; Las Vegas News Bureau, p. 4; Will McBride, p. 136; Simon Nathan, p. 180-183 (8); Terry O'Neill, p. 180-182 (9); J. Barry O'Rourke, p. 3 (2), 4 (2), 129; Pompeo Posar, p. 168-175; Ben Rose, p. 135; Francesco Scavullo, p. 136; Suzanne Seed, p. 4; Skrebneski, p. 134, 192-193; J Frederick Smith, p. 139; Mason P. Smith, p. 4; Vernon L. Smith, p. 3 (3), 4 (3); Ron Traeger, p. 3; Gene Trindl, p. 3 (2); Pete Turner, p. 137, p. 206-217 from the collections of: Jay Arnold, David Bailey (2), Frank Bez, Giancarlo Botti, Mario Casilli (3), William Claxton, Raymond Depardon, John Derek, Brian Hamill, Hatami, Dwight Hooker, David Hurn, Just Jeacklin, Mary Ellen Mark (2), Dan McCoy, Marvin E. Newman (3), Doris Nieh (2), Terry O'Neill (2), Orlando, Don Ornitz, J. Barry O'Rourke (2), Alan Pappe (3), David Parks (2), Pompeo Posar (2), Chiara Samugheo, Steve Schapiro, Lawrence Schiller, Peter Sorel, Ron Thal (2), Jay Thompson, Gene Trindl, Alexas Urba, Guy Webster (2), Eric Weston, Bob Willoughby (2), Art Zelin (2).
200050_19711201_025466.xml
tableOfContents
6
6
Table of Contents
[no value]
Contents for the Men's Entertainment Magazine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playbill .......... 3
200050_19711201_025467.xml
advertisement
7
7
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
McKesson Liquor Co.
Galliano
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025468.xml
advertisement
8
8
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Royal Typewriter Company.
Typewriting
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025469.xml
masthead
8
8
Masthead
[no value]
Masthead
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Hugh M. Hefner,editor and publisher
200050_19711201_025470.xml
advertisement
9
9
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Canada Dry Corporation
Club Soda
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025471.xml
advertisement
10
10,11
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Marlboro
Cigarettes
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025472.xml
advertisement
12
12
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Be A Ballantine's Loyalist.
Whisky
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025473.xml
advertisement
13
13
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Buxton
Key Keepers
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025474.xml
article
13
13,14,16,18,20
Letters to the Editor
[no value]
Dear Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Appraising Jules
200050_19711201_025475.xml
other
13
13
Indicia
[no value]
Indicia
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy, December, 1971 Volume 18, Number 12. Published monthly by Playboy, Playboy Building, 919 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60611. Subscriptions: In the United States, its possessions and Canada, $24 for three years, $18 for two years, $10 for one year. Elsewhere add $2 per year for foreign postage. Allow 30 days for new subscriptions and renewals. Change of Address: Send both old and new addresses to Playboy, Playboy Building, 919 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60611, and allow 30 days for change. Marketing: Victor Lownes, Director of Creative Development; Nelson Futch, Promotion Director; Lee Gottlieb, Director of Public Relations. Advertising: Howard W. Lederer, Advertising Director; Jules Kase, Joseph Guenther, Associate Advertising Managers, 405 Park Avenue, New York, New York 10022; Sherman Keats, Chicago Manager, 919 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60611; Detroit, William F. Moore, Manager, 818 Fisher Building; Los Angeles, Stanley L. Perkins, Manager, 8721 Beverly Boulevard; San Francisco, Robert E. Stephens, Manager, 110 Sutter Street; Southeastern Representative, Pirnie & Brown, 3108 Piedmont Road, N. E., Atlanta, Georgia 30305.
200050_19711201_025476.xml
advertisement
15
15
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RCA
TV
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025477.xml
advertisement
16
16
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Kaywoodie
Kaywoodie
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025478.xml
advertisement
17
17
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Stereo Tape Club Of America.
Recording
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025479.xml
advertisement
18
18
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Ultimate Magnavox (Model 9299)-Solid-State Stereo FM/AM Radio-Phonograph.
Radio
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025480.xml
advertisement
19
19
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Somerset Importers, Ltd.
Johnnie Walker Red
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025481.xml
advertisement
20
20
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Hitachi
Cassette
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025482.xml
advertisement
21
21
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Bulova Watch Company, Inc.
Watch
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025483.xml
advertisement
22
22
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jaymar-Ruby, Inc.
Slacks
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025484.xml
advertisement
23
23
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jaymar Slacks.
Slacks
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025485.xml
advertisement
24
24
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Panasonic.
Music
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025486.xml
review
25
25,26
Review
[no value]
Playboy After Hours
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
When Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot premiered at the Théâtre de Babylone in Paris in 1953, modern drama was transformed virtually overnight into a sounding board for a new and revolutionary kind of playwright--the spokesman for existentialist or absurdist modes of thought. The theater of the absurd was born, and as the names of its prophets quickly proliferated (Ionesco, Pinter, Albee, et al.), the mood of spiritual and psychic malaise that permeated their work became a powerful influence in modern literature. In the interest of nothing more profound than idle speculation, we found ourself wondering just how Clement C. Moore's classic A Visit from St. Nicholas might have turned out if it had been written by a contemporary playwright--someone with the unlikely name of, say, Clement C. Beckett. It would look something like this:
200050_19711201_025487.xml
review
26
26,28,30,33,34,36,38,40,42,44
Review-Books
[no value]
Books
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Few books this year will be as closely read and as hotly disputed as Beyond Freedom and Dignity (Knopf), by Harvard's famed behavioral psychologist, B. F. Skinner. This iconoclastic attack on the idea of man as an autonomous being is a challenge to the thinking of all men who pride themselves on their ability to use intelligence and reason in the pursuit of knowledge. In Skinner's view, intelligence and reason are nothing more than the selective response of a unique organism to the stimulation of its environment. Says he: "A person does not act upon the world; the world acts upon him." Man makes choices from a limited range of possibilities, and behavior, according to Skinner, "is shaped and maintained by its consequences." Thus, by altering the environment, man in effect engineers his own behavior. His actions are determined not by what he thinks or feels but by the rewards or penalties he receives for what he does. If the human race is to survive, Skinner believes, man must give up the idea that his acts are attributable to free will, to his ability to distinguish right from wrong, and cooperate instead in the development of conditioning techniques that will use positive reinforcement to alter individual behavior. "The control of the population as a whole must be delegated to specialists--to police, priests, teachers, therapists and so on, with their specialized reinforcers and their codified contingencies." Beyond Freedom and Dignity is a cogent argument by a scientist to a jury of his intellectual peers. The argument, however distasteful it may seem, is the crystallization of a lifetime spent in exploring the nature of man through the principles of behavioral psychology, and it cannot be easily dismissed. It is not simply a matter of intellectual game playing, of behaviorism vs. humanism. At stake is how man can best hope to acquire the knowledge he needs to keep the human race from coming to an end.
200050_19711201_025488.xml
advertisement
27
27
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R.J.Reynolds Tobacco Company.
Camel
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025489.xml
advertisement
28
28
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Kodak
Camera
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025490.xml
advertisement
29
29
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Van Heusen Company.
Van Heusen
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025491.xml
advertisement
30
30
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Sole Importer U.S.A. Munson Shaw Co.
Whisky
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025492.xml
advertisement
31
31
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
General Electric.
Radio
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025493.xml
advertisement
32
32
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gordon's Dry Gin Co.
Distilled London Dry Gin
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025494.xml
advertisement
33
33
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Go All The Way-Go Western.
Boots
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025495.xml
advertisement
34
34
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Medico Filter Pipes
Medico Filter Pipes
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025496.xml
advertisement
34
34
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025497.xml
advertisement
35
35
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Pub Cologne.
Shave Balm
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025498.xml
advertisement
36
36
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Berkey.
Camera
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025499.xml
advertisement
36
36
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Chrysler.
Plymouth
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025500.xml
advertisement
37
37
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Superscope, Inc.
Radio
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025501.xml
advertisement
38
38
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Wind Song Girls Only Want One Thing.
Song
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025502.xml
advertisement
38
38
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
American Tourister
Tourister
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025503.xml
advertisement
39
39
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Soft Hair.
Brylcreem
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025504.xml
advertisement
40
40
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Zenith
Radio
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025505.xml
advertisement
40
40
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Buxton
Buxton
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025506.xml
advertisement
41
41
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Shick Electronics Inc.
Shick
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025507.xml
advertisement
42
42
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gordon's Drygin Co., Ltd.
Gordon's Vodka
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025508.xml
advertisement
43
43
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Chantilly.
Houbigant
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025509.xml
advertisement
44
44
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Brut
Feberge
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025510.xml
review
44
44,46
Review-Dining-Drinking
[no value]
Dining-Drinking
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Born last January during the despair of Hollywood's most alarming recession, the chances of survival for Le St. Germain (5955 Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles) seemed none too great. But the infant restaurant not only survived, it has swiftly emerged as the "in" establishment in a city that thrives on scripts involving underdogs and overnight successes. The excellence of cuisine, which has earned the 20-table restaurant its deserved reputation, makes one overlook such distractions as the cacophony, discothèque lighting and absence of prices on the à-la-carte menu. (To be on the safe side, figure on spending about $50 for dinner for two, including cocktails, wine and tip.) For hors d'oeuvres, try the Salade de Champignons--crispy sliced mushrooms anointed with a dressing of mustard, oil, vinegar and wine, crowned with a sprinkling of chives. The especially delicate chicken-liver and pheasant pâtés, as well as Escargots de Bourgogne and Scampis Newburg, are of similar merit. Le St. Germain's menu lists a dozen entrees (along with a brace of nightly specials), including Tournedos Périgourdine (beef cooked with truffles and madeira), Filets Mignons au Poivre and rack of lamb. One of the dishes sampled on our visit was Ris de Veau--commonly known as veal sweet-breads--which is a must. Augmenting the entrees were two perfectly prepared fresh vegetables: cauliflower au gratin and French-cut string beans sautéed in butter. Le St. Germain's extensive wine list ranges from nonvintage house Cabernet Sauvignon or Pinot Noir (at five dollars a bottle) to the $100 price tag accompanying a 1959 Château Lafite-Rothschild. Besides the inevitable crème caramel and crispy tarts plump with peaches or pears, the dessert selection is memorable for a thick mousse au chocolat laced with rum and the exotic Délices St. Germain--a creamy conglomerate of soft vanilla ice cream, fresh strawberries and raspberries lavished with a heady mixture of Grand Marnier and cognac. One word of caution: The five minuscule tables nestled in Le St. Germain's charming L-shaped bar area are regarded as the restaurant's Siberia--stay clear of them, as the din and the constant flow of traffic will undermine an otherwise enjoyable occasion. To avoid the disappointment recently experienced by such pop gourmets as Henry Kissinger and Zsa Zsa Gabor, who on separate evenings were unable to secure tables, dinner reservations should be made several days in advance (213-467-1108). Le St. Germain is open for dinner, Monday through Saturday, from six P.M. until 10:30 P.M. Lunch is served Monday through Friday from noon to two P.M. (The luncheon menu lists prices.) The only credit cards accepted are BankAmericard and Master Charge.
200050_19711201_025511.xml
advertisement
45
45
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Qaudio By Toyo.
Radio
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025512.xml
advertisement
46
46
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Ventura's Group.
Painless Packing
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025513.xml
review
46
46,48,51,52,54,59,61,62
Review-Films
[no value]
Movies
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The custom of turning rock concerts into feature-length movies à la Wood-stock and Monterey Pop reaches a climax of sorts in two new musical spectaculars. The more professional of the pair is Medicine Ball Caravan, coproduced and directed by François Reichenbach, a pioneer of cinéma vérité techniques in his native France. Under the patronage of Warner Bros., Reichenbach piled his crew of photographers into buses with 150 American music makers, hangers-on and hippies for a three-week cross-country sing-in. Since the entourage included B. B. King, Alice Cooper, Delaney and Bonnie and other name acts (quite a few of them contracted to Warner Bros. Records), Medicine Ball achieves plenty of bounce from time to time. "We have come for your daughters," proclaims the sign on the front of a bus, a fair sample of the humor expressed by Reichenbach himself, who keeps popping into the film for wry interviews and comment. All the jolly decadence (casual nudity, or communal bathing in a huge vat of Jell-O, for example) is seriously questioned, though, when the caravan stops at Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, where campus progressives wonder whether a pilgrimage sponsored by a major movie studio has any larger aims than to turn a profit. A pertinent question, which this fast-moving show manages to evade with aural and optical virtuosity. Twice as exciting is Soul to Soul, a filmed account of the trip to Africa early in 1971 by black performers invited to a festival celebrating the 14th anniversary of Ghana's independence. Wilson Pickett, Roberta Flack, Ike and Tina Turner and their exuberant colleagues arrive on the Dark Continent looking and behaving like any eager American tourists--off to the bazaars with cameras and traveler's checks--but turn on when they and their Ghanaian hosts begin digging each other's drumbeats. Whether Tina is shimmying through the local equivalent of a luau or electrifying a stadium full of spectators with her wildly stylized interpretation of sex set to music, that dynamic lady communicates on a human level that official envoys shall never achieve. Pickett has his moments, too, in this "cultural come-together" that drew over 100,000 people to Accra's Black Star Square. One sharp contrast to American pop-music festivals, which have tended to turn sour lately, is the sight of Ghana's uniformed militia amiably weaving and bobbing in rhythm with the crowds they came to control.
200050_19711201_025514.xml
advertisement
46
46
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Princess Gardner.
Prince Gardner
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025515.xml
advertisement
47
47
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Gillette Company.
Gillette
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025516.xml
advertisement
48
48
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Madeira Gold Tobacco.
Madeira Gold
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025517.xml
advertisement
49
49
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Marantz International
Radio
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025518.xml
advertisement
50
50
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ETDC.
Early Times
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025519.xml
advertisement
51
51
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
S,H, Parker Co.
Music
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025520.xml
advertisement
51
51
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025521.xml
advertisement
52
52
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Yello-Bole.
Yello Bole
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025522.xml
advertisement
53
53
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Arpege
Lanvin
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025523.xml
advertisement
54
54
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Buxton.
Pocket Packer
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025524.xml
advertisement
54
54
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Kenwood
Radio
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025525.xml
advertisement
55
55
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Schenley Imports Co.
Whisky
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025526.xml
advertisement
57
57,56
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025527.xml
advertisement
58
58
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Brown-Forman Distillers Import Company.
Whisky
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025528.xml
advertisement
59
59
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BSR(USA)LTD.
Record
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025529.xml
advertisement
59
59
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Consolidated Cigar Corp.
Maruman
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025530.xml
advertisement
60
60,61
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Fisher
Music
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025531.xml
article
62
62
News
[no value]
Music
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Big Five are still the Big Five, no matter how you choose to rank them. Boston, Cleveland, New York, Chicago and Philadelphia boast the finest orchestras in the United States today. But because most of them have experienced recent changes of one sort or another, we can expect musical changes, too. The Boston Symphony is still a magnificent institution, but its music director, William Steinberg, is a most literal-minded conductor, sometimes plodding, sometimes pedantic. His young associate, Michael Tilson Thomas, is none of these things, and his recordings and concerts with the B. S. O. have been startling. Thomas has drive and precision, power and assurance far beyond his 27 years. He seems also to have identified himself with Ives, Debussy and other early modernists in a desire to get the orchestra out of the Beethoven-Brahms-Mozart repertoire that chokes the entire classical-music scene. The Boston hasn't sounded so good since the days of Koussevitzky. Since the death of George Szell last year, the Cleveland Orchestra has been beating the bushes for a new leader. Szell's great accomplishment was to mold his orchestra into an incomparably responsive instrument, so flexible that any conductor could get superb results. This, of course, took years as well as an intense concentration of amiable tyranny and classical technique. In his one-season role as musical advisor for the New York Philharmonic, Szell also gave that orchestra some direction and stability, but the Philharmonic's virtuoso musicians play brilliantly or stridently, depending on who's in charge. The probing formalism and intellectual rigor of Pierre Boulez, who has succeeded conductor laureate Leonard Bernstein as head of the Philharmonic, should give the orchestra the sense of equilibrium and purpose it needs. If New Yorkers can stand the heavy doses of post-Webern contemporary music of which Boulez is fond, his appointment could be a notable happening. In Chicago, where Georg Solti is firmly enthroned and Carlo Maria Giulini is principal guest conductor, audiences have been responding warmly to performances very different from the neat objectivity of Boulez. Solti stresses sweep, passion and texture, and the acoustically restored Orchestra Hall has not reverberated to such joyful noises since the time of Reiner. In Philadelphia, Eugene Ormandy, apparently indestructible, is into his 36th season with an orchestra that must be the most popular, if not the greatest, in the world. The Philadelphia has a uniquely gorgeous sound--big and rich, yet precise. Its leader, who has often been faulted for a lack of musical assertiveness, continues to make listenable music for everyone. On the heels of the Big Five, there are other contenders in the symphonic sweepstakes. Despite its somewhat obscure status and the acoustical problems of its new St. Paul auditorium, the Minnesota Orchestra, led by Stanislaw Skrowaczewski, is an outstanding, long-established ensemble. On the West Coast, two celebrated, if eccentric, young conductors are making their marks. Indian-born Zubin Mehta, leading the Los Angeles Philharmonic, travels constantly, likes to insult the New York Philharmonic and, a couple of years ago, got his orchestra involved in a horrendous rock concert. Manchurian-born Seiji Ozawa, somewhat more serious about his music than Mehta, now leads the San Francisco Symphony. He, too, travels a lot and, because of his electric way with a score, may be one of the two or three best conductors in the world. A question to muse upon: With the exception of Michael Tilson Thomas, where are tomorrow's American conductors?
200050_19711201_025532.xml
review
62
62,64,66
Review-Recorded Music
[no value]
Recordings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Ike and Tina Turner have been making it big for several years. But until What You Hear Is What You Get (United Artists), two discs of a Carnegie Hall concert, some of the supercharged vitality of their live performances has always seemed missing. Turner fans may now rejoice as Tina demonstrates how to turn on an audience. Her standards, Ooh Poo Pah Doo, Proud Mary and Otis Redding's Respect, are particularly instructive. Our only reservation is that Tina's frantic pace and pitch may wear a bit thin after a time: What works in concert doesn't always work on vinyl. Anyhow, the high point of the proceedings is reached in I've Been Loving You Too Long, her marvelous recitative duet with Ike, replete with orgiastic groans, slurping noises and some standout sexual comedy.
200050_19711201_025533.xml
advertisement
63
63
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Seagram Distillers Company.
Whisky
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025534.xml
advertisement
WS1
WS1
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Brown-Forman Distillers Corp.
Whisky
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025535.xml
advertisement
WS2
WS2,WS3
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JCPenney Stereo Systems.
Music
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025536.xml
advertisement
WS4
WS4
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Zinfandel.
Zinfandel
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025537.xml
advertisement
65
65
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RCA
Music
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025538.xml
advertisement
67
67
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Taylor Company.
Cold Duck
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025539.xml
advertisement
68
68,69
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
S.R.C. Remictric Shaver Division/Bridgeport, Conn.
Remington
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025540.xml
advertisement
70
70
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Seagram Distillers Co.
Whisky
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025541.xml
advertisement
71
71
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Speed-A-Gift
Speed-A-Gift
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025542.xml
article
71
71,72,74
Reader QA
[no value]
The Playboy Advisor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
What can I do about a girl who wants to remain totally passive during lovemaking? I have enjoyed a sexual relationship with her for the past two months, but now she has decided that she wants to experience an orgasm without any active participation whatsoever on her part, which she feels should be possible if I stimulate her sufficiently (orally, manually or otherwise). I have tried to discuss this with her patiently, but she remains insistent; now I'm beginning to wonder if what she wants is possible. Is it?--S. B., Sacramento, California.
200050_19711201_025543.xml
advertisement
73
73
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Winnebaco
Winnebaco
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025544.xml
advertisement
74
74
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Minolta
Minolta
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025545.xml
advertisement
75
75
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Ampex
Ampex
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025546.xml
advertisement
76
76
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Schick Dry Styler
Schick Dry Styler
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025547.xml
advertisement
77
77
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Schick
Schick
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025548.xml
article
77
77,78,79,80,82,84,86,88,90
Reader Discussion
[no value]
The Playboy Forum
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A Case of Manslaughter
200050_19711201_025549.xml
article
78
78,79
Reader Discussion
[no value]
Forum Newsfront
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Proud and the Prudish
200050_19711201_025550.xml
advertisement
81
81
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Cory, New York
Cory, New York
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025551.xml
advertisement
83
83
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gte Sylvania
Gte Sylvania
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025552.xml
advertisement
85
85
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Canon Bell & Howell
Canon Bell & Howell
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025553.xml
advertisement
87
87
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Pall Mall
Pall Mall
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025554.xml
advertisement
89
89
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Clairol Inc.
Clairol Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025555.xml
advertisement
91
91
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Memorex Corporation
Memorex Corporation
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025556.xml
advertisement
92
92
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOY
JOY
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025557.xml
article
93
93,94,96,98,100,102,104,106,108,110,112,114,116,118,126
Playboy Interview
[no value]
Roman Polanski
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
There was virtually no action, and the plot was starkly simple: A successful middle-aged Polish journalist, his restless wife and a young hitchhiker they have picked up spend a weekend on a yacht, with subtle, potentially murderous psychosexual tensions developing among them. But "Knife in the Water," Roman Polanski's first feature film (which he co-authored), won an Academy Award nomination for best foreign film of 1963 and made its director internationally famous at the age of 30.
200050_19711201_025558.xml
advertisement
95
95
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp.
Tobacco
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025559.xml
advertisement
97
97
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Paddington Corp.
Paddington Corp.
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025560.xml
advertisement
99
99
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Men's Store
Store
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025561.xml
advertisement
101
101
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Old Grand-Dad Distillery Co.
Old Grand-Dad Distillery Co.
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025562.xml
advertisement
103
103
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L&M Filter Kings
L&M Filter Kings
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025563.xml
advertisement
105
105
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Kayser-Roth
Kayser-Roth
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025564.xml
advertisement
107
107
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dr.Grabow
Dr.Grabow
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025565.xml
advertisement
109
109
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Calvert Distillers Co.
Calvert Distillers Co.
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025566.xml
advertisement
111
111
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Miller Brewing Co.
The Miller Brewing Co.
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025567.xml
advertisement
113
113
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Lorillard
Lorillard
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025568.xml
advertisement
115
115
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Austin, Nichols & Co.
Austin, Nichols & Co.
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025569.xml
advertisement
117
117
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Nunn Bush Shoe Co.
Shoe
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025570.xml
advertisement
119
119
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025571.xml
article
121
120,121,122,123,124,303
Feature
[no value]
The Dashing Fellow
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Vladimir Nabokov
Our suitcase is carefully embellished with bright-colored stickers: Nürnberg, Stuttgart, Köln--and even Lido (but that one is fraudulent). We have a swarthy complexion, a network of purple-red veins, a black mustache, trimly clipped, and hairy nostrils. We breathe hard through our nose as we try to solve a crossword puzzle in an émigré paper. We are alone in a third-class compartment--alone and, therefore, bored.
200050_19711201_025572.xml
article
125
125
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Eldon Dedini
[no value]
200050_19711201_025573.xml
article
128
127,128,129,130,336,338,339,340
Feature
[no value]
New York--A Town Without Foreplay
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Bruce Jay Friedman
It looks more or less the same. Approaching, say, from the Queensboro Bridge at 59th Street, the buildings still appear majestic, confident, imperious, like players in some magnificent backfield or, for the more extravagant, like sentries at the gates of Olympus. The much-talked-about pollutive screen hangs above the city; but since there is no way actually to see it at work on the lungs, the effect is muted and cinematic, the work of an ambitious new film director, shaky on character, secure when it comes to giving his picture a "look." From a distance, it is all quite safe and manageable; but closer in, when the view becomes hot and stupendous and it's clear you're not dealing with a picture postcard, even the cool customer sucks in his breath a bit. Coming in on steerage, the immigrants felt it, of course, and the local who has been wandering in foreign lands experiences it more sharply than anyone. But even the commuter, struggling bumper to bumper from Hicksville, exhausted before the day has begun, has been known to revive somewhat, as though slapped by a Madison Avenue skin bracer, on catching that first exhilarative shock of the city. There is much of this in the approach to San Juan, the look of Rome from the Hills, the first sight of the Pacific and even dropping down over St. Louis--a sense of new and dangerous possibilities--but in the case of New York City, there seems to be a higher ante, more wild cards to the deck. Making first contact with this town, that elevator-dropping junkie's rush of excitement has to do with the fact that no matter how many times a visitor has been elbowed away from the table or come home tapioca city, there are more chances in New York that the dice will pass his way again; the list is long of those who've rolled their way back to a piece of the casino.
200050_19711201_025574.xml
article
131
131,158,266,267,268,269
Feature
[no value]
S*e*x Comes to Thief Island
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Richard Hooker
Having more or less outlasted the enemy, the Korean War and the U.S. Army, the men of M*A*S*H put on civilian clothes and went their separate ways. From the 4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital, Dr. "Trapper" John McIntyre went to New York to practice cardiac surgery; Dr. "Duke" Forrest went south; Dr. Oliver Wendell ("Spearchucker") Jones became chief of neurosurgery at University Hospital in Philadelphia; and Dr. Benjamin Franklin ("Hawkeye") Pierce went home to Maine. They all seemed to have found what they'd wanted--except for Hawkeye. He was restless. There was something missing from life at the Spruce Harbor VA Hospital. He went to the big city for a couple of years of training in thoracic surgery; then, when he went back to Spruce Harbor to start his own practice, a devious scheme began to form in his mind. But how do you lure, entice, decoy or seduce three eminent physicians to the rustic shores of the Pine Tree State? Only (continued on page 158)Thief Island(continued from page 131) Hawkeye would have a clue. Only Hawkeye knew what looniness lurked in the hearts of men.
200050_19711201_025575.xml
article
132
132,133
Humor
[no value]
Bah! Humbug!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
David Stevens
Alfred De Bat
George Bernard Shaw put it rather nicely when he called Christmas "an indecent subject; a cruel, gluttonous subject; a drunken, disorderly subject; a wasteful, disastrous subject; a wicked, cadging, lying, filthy, blasphemous and demoralizing subject," concluding that if he had his way, "anyone who looked back to it would be turned into a pillar of greasy sausages." Ebenezer Scrooge, however, was a bit more succinct. "'If I could work my will,' said Scrooge indignantly, 'every idiot who goes about with "Merry Christmas" on his lips should be boiled with his own pudding, and buried with a stake of holly through his heart.'" So now that the holidays are once again upon us, here's a quiz designed to plumb the depths of your own acid content. Simply take a pencil and mark your answers to the following 20 questions (only one answer per question, please). Then check the scoring box at the end of the quiz. And if you don't like what you learn, don't call us; we'll be busy evicting deadbeat paraplegics while the snow's still on the ground.
200050_19711201_025576.xml
pictorial
134
134,135,136,137,138,139,140,141
Pictorial
[no value]
Personal Visions of the Erotic
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
With Nary a twinge of self-doubt, Webster's succinctly defines erotic as "tending to arouse sexual love or desire." We've always thought that definition left a great deal to be desired concerning what actually is erotic. Since one man's turn-on could be another's turnoff, the term remains open to wide interpretation. As a result, Playboy asked a number of leading photographers to visually define what erotic means to them. While we had certainly expected the creativity and imagination of these premier lensmen to produce a broad spectrum of powerful pictures, the range and variety of their efforts proved a captivating surprise. We think you'll agree that eroticism is in the eye of the beholder.
200050_19711201_025577.xml
article
142
142,143
News
[no value]
Playboy's Christmas Cards
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Judith Wax
To The Talk-Show Kings
200050_19711201_025578.xml
article
145
144,145,244,245,248,250,252,253,254,255,256,257,258
Feature
[no value]
Can the Real Howard Hughes...
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Edwin Fadiman, Jr.
Toward the latter part of 1924, a lanky 18-year-old walked into a Houston courtroom to make an unusual request. Under an obscure Texas law, a minor who could prove that he was competent to handle his own affairs was entitled to inherit a business and run it.
200050_19711201_025579.xml
article
146
146,147,148,312,313,314,315,316
Feature
[no value]
...Still Stand Up?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
James Phelan
If you're up there, you son of a bitch, you're going to jail!" cried Chester Davis, Wall Street lawyer, Harvard Law School graduate and New York country squire.
200050_19711201_025580.xml
pictorial
149
149,150,151,152,153,154,155,156,157
Pictorial
[no value]
Playboy's Christmas Gift Guide
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025581.xml
article
159
159
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Interlandi
[no value]
200050_19711201_025582.xml
article
160
160,161,162,163,164,270,271,272,274,275,276,278,280,282,284,285,286,287,288
Feature
[no value]
A Meeting With Medusa
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Arthur C. Clarke
A Day to Remember
200050_19711201_025583.xml
article
165
165,166,194,290,293,294,295,296,298,299,300,302
Feature
[no value]
Shelley
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dan Greenburg
In the Winter of 1966, I returned to New York from a lonely four-month stay in Europe, carrying my one and only suitcase, wearing my black and only suit, having lost 20 pounds from an already slim frame, and I imagine that my grim, black-garbed, skeletal presence frightened more than a few passers-by on the street.
200050_19711201_025584.xml
article
167
167
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Dempsey
[no value]
200050_19711201_025585.xml
pictorial
168
168,169,170,171,172-174,175
Playmate
[no value]
Karen Christy, Miss December, 1971
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Pompeo Posar
Karen Christy's life has taken a sudden and very exhilarating change of direction. While she'd almost come to anticipate transitions in her life style, they had been, until last summer, of a necessary and not uncommon nature. First, the 20-year-old native of Abilene, Texas, moved north to Denton in 1969 to major in commercial art at North Texas State. Her plans for a degree were cut short after just one year, however, when she realized that part-time-job income could not adequately meet school and living expenses. So Karen moved to Dallas and adjusted smoothly to the working-girl role. For nearly a year, she was a secretary in Texas' second-largest city. Then, last year, she heard about a Playboy Bunny Hunt being conducted by Club representatives looking for girls in the Dallas--Fort Worth area who might wish to wear a pair of Bunny ears. Somewhat timorously, she decided to attend. "Some office friends convinced me to go." Not at all surprisingly, she far exceeded the requirements and, soon afterward, received an invitation in the mail to become a cottontail at the Chicago Club. At first, Karen demurred, then she decided that it might be very worth while to experience a complete change of place and people; she notified Club officials and flew to Chicago. "In the beginning, I thought I'd made a bad mistake." Her taste runs to the new and modern. "Old things depress me," she says frankly. And that preference extends to the city she lives in. "Dallas is a relatively new city, filled with modern buildings and homes." In contrast, her first impressions of Chicago were of squat, undistinguished office buildings and the long, narrow belt of elegant postwar high-rises on Lake Shore Drive. She was disappointed. Quickly, however, Karen grew to like it, largely due to the two essential aspects of her life: her work and her residence. She's been alternating her Bunny stints with increasingly frequent assignments from Playboy Models and she's living in the Bunny Dormitory in Hugh Hefner's Mansion. "The Mansion is fantastic," she says. "There's always something going on. The parties give me a chance to meet well-known people, entertainers, politicians, athletes: a great mix." And during less revelous hours, Karen appreciates other advantages the Mansion offers. "Most nights, there's a movie showing. Also, I really like the company of the other girls." It's clear that Karen now feels thoroughly satisfied with her move. For Miss December, the Playboy Mansion is a fascinating ménage that she's more than delighted to call home.
200050_19711201_025586.xml
article
176
176
Humor
[no value]
Playboy's Party Jokes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Leaving the poker party late, as usual, two friends compared notes. "I can never fool my wife," the first complained. "I turn off the car's engine and coast into the garage, take off my shoes, sneak upstairs and undress in the bathroom, but she always wakes up and yells like crazy about my being late."
200050_19711201_025587.xml
article
177
177
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Alden Erikson
[no value]
200050_19711201_025588.xml
article
178
178,179,263,264
Humor
[no value]
A Feminist Looks at History
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dr. Virginia Slimmes
For 5000 years, male authors have been conditioning women to accept masculine-oriented interpretations of human events, interpretations saturated with the most appalling sexist lies, misconceptions and factual errors. Little wonder that today's woman is insecure, confused and cranky and that one out of every three has developed a facial tic. If American women are to achieve true freedom and fulfillment--as opposed to the spurious kind consisting of material comforts and laborsaving appliances--they will have to re-examine and re-evaluate history and rewrite it to show what really happened. If my thesis is correct, we will see emerge a very different picture from the one men have painted.
200050_19711201_025589.xml
pictorial
180
180,181,182,183
Pictorial
[no value]
Vegas Comes Up 007
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Late Ian Fleming's indomitable secret agent. James Bond, has addictive qualities. In novel form, he has attracted such prominent fans as President John F. Kennedy; onscreen, he has since 1962 been entertaining theater-filling fans numbering into the hundreds of thousands. Now, it appears, even 007's best-known alter ego is hooked by the role. After a one-picture absence, during which he loudly proclaimed that he was sick and tired of being James Bond, saturnine Scotsman Sean Connery is back in Bondage as the hero of Diamonds Are Forever, due to open over the holidays in theaters throughout the country. Produced, as were six previous Bond epics--five starring Connery and one featuring George Lazenby--by Albert R. ("Cubby") Broccoli and Harry Saltzman for United Artists, Diamonds sets Bond on the trail of a gem-smuggling ring that leads to the casinos of Las Vegas. Most of the action takes place in and around the Nevada gambling capital, making this the first Bond movie shot principally in the U.S. In the best 007 screen tradition, Connery comes in contact with a number of pneumatic maidens, notably Jill St. John as Tiffany Case and Lana Wood as Plenty O'Toole. (It was Playboy's April uncoverage of Miss Wood that brought her to the film makers' attention.) Also present in Diamonds are the other standard 007 film ingredients: infernally clever machines (a diamond encrusted, butterfly-winged moon car and an oyster-shaped one-man sub) and adrenaline-boosting chases (a dozen cars crack up in Downtown Vegas). All in all, we predict a warm yule box-office welcome for the return of the prodigal Sean.
200050_19711201_025590.xml
article
185
184,185
Cartoon
[no value]
Vargas Girl
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Alberto Vargas
[no value]
200050_19711201_025591.xml
article
186
186,187,188,189,190,191
Humor
[no value]
Professor Zachary Ding's Patented Official Unabridged Condensed New 1972 Autocyclopedia, A through Z
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Brock Yates
Bruce McCall
Introduction by Lester Smeed, the Author's best Friend: Professor Zachary Ding has been astounding his friends and loved ones for years with a knowledge of things automotive that often borders on the articulate. "There goes a '49 Nash Airflyte," he will often observe, lapsing into a thoughtful silence that may last for weeks before those piercing eyes light up again and he exclaims, "There goes a Studebaker Lark, '59 maybe." "Ding," I boggled one time, after the keen-eyed professor had nailed a '51 De Soto from half a block away, "you're a walking encyclopedia!" This gave him the idea for which his entire life suddenly seemed to have been mere preparation. Alas, Ding was ahead of his time. The world was not yet ready for an encyclopedia that could ambulate--though, in all fairness, it should be admitted that Ding's invention managed more of a shuffle than a walk when it moved at all. Be that as it may--and it was--the venture exhausted the good professor's meager life savings; to recoup, he next hit upon the notion of an encyclopedia of automobiles, an Autocylopedia, as he termed it, with that academic's gift for boiling complex ideas down into words of seven syllables. The rest is history, of a sort. The Autocylopedia--with lots of words and full-color pictures that are almost in register--has gone through more than 100 printings at 100 printers, and each will be paid, if this new improved edition, with its nearly perfect spelling and often uncannily accurate dates, meets with even half the success Professor Ding has promised his backers.
200050_19711201_025592.xml
pictorial
192
192,193
Pictorial
[no value]
Galawear Gets it On
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robert L.Green
[no value]
200050_19711201_025593.xml
article
195
195,196,197,198,199,200,259,260
Feature
[no value]
George Segal: Love's Labors Cast
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jan Van Der Marck
George Segal traps his subjects' basic yearnings in plaster and presents them to us as Everyman's. "I don't want to be explicit; I want to evoke feeling."
200050_19711201_025594.xml
article
201
201,202,203,204,318,320,322,324,325,326,328,330,332,333,334,335
Feature
[no value]
The Coming of the Psychopath
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Alan Harrington
"There walk among us men and women who are in but not of our world," wrote psychiatrist Robert Lindner. "Often the sign by which they betray themselves is crime, crime of an explosive, impulsive, reckless type. Sometimes the sign is ruthlessness in dealing with others socially, even commercially."
200050_19711201_025595.xml
article
205
205
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Edmond Kiraz
[no value]
200050_19711201_025596.xml
article
207
206,207,208,209,210,211,212,213,214,215,216,217,218,304,305,306,307,308,309,310,311
Feature
[no value]
Sex Stars of 1971
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Arthur Knight
Hollis Alpert
No matter what--or whom--the charts may show, the major stars of 1971 were neither brawny males nor voluptuous females. According to box-office ratings (and what else is there?), they were a pack of rats (Willard), a couple of schools of sharks (Blue Water, White Death), an unsettling collection of insects (The Hellstrom Chronicle) and a particularly virulent and elusive virus from outer space (The Andromeda Strain). The biology lessons that have for so long been the number-one course in the cinema's college of scatological knowledge were seemingly, if perhaps only momentarily, replaced by natural (or unnatural) history. Although the rats of Willard and the bugs of Hellstrom were never as charming as their two-legged counterparts, they exerted an odd fascination that not even their production companies had anticipated.
200050_19711201_025597.xml
article
220
220,219,221,222,260,261,262
Humor
[no value]
Griselda and the Porn-o-Phone
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Allan Sherman
Griselda Thrindle was born in Puritan Ethic, Wisconsin, and raised by her father, an insanely ambitious janitor.
200050_19711201_025598.xml
article
223
223,230,236,238,240,242,243,244
Feature
[no value]
Crazy Kids Cross the Ocean
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Herbert Gold
Girls with Longish, roundish heads mysteriously charmed me. I thought it was the smile, walk, intelligence, grace, but it turns out to be the head. Other strengths later come into play--the soul, the person--but first the head. I married a lady with a round head, but not a long one, and tried to forget the girl with different strengths who made me shriek in a darkened room of the Ben Franklin Hotel in Philadelphia on a weekend of Army leave.
200050_19711201_025599.xml
article
224
224,225
Ribald Classics
[no value]
Ribald Classic: The Ballad of Dan Homer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Oh, me name is Dan Homer; I'm blind as the Jews And I travels about with me head full of news; But the gods call me Danny and teach me the rhymes, Though I've never been home since the classical times.
200050_19711201_025600.xml
article
226
226,227,228,270
Feature
[no value]
Spirits of Christmas Past......and Present
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Emanuel Greenberg
Christmastide is no time for martinis, manhattans or other conventional nostrums. The mood of the season is open and convivial; Gemütlichkeit is loose in the land. The idea--to paraphrase Simon ... or is it Garfunkel?--is to make the feeling last. And it isn't that hard. All you need is a group of simpatico souls and a complement of cheery libations whose color and content evoke thoughts of yuletide.
200050_19711201_025601.xml
article
229
229
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dink Siegel
[no value]
200050_19711201_025602.xml
article
231
231,232,234,235
Feature
[no value]
Safely Deposited
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Calvin Trillin
Mr. Billings realized that he had raised his voice for the first time in his 17 years with the Manhattan Trust Company. Instead of silently reminding himself that self-control in front of subordinates was a prerequisite for executive success, he raised his voice again--louder. "They're doing what?" he shouted.
200050_19711201_025603.xml
advertisement
233
233
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Fleischmann Distilling Corporation
The Fleischmann Distilling Corporation
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025604.xml
article
234
234
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Buck Brown
[no value]
200050_19711201_025605.xml
article
235
235
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Sidney Harris
[no value]
200050_19711201_025606.xml
advertisement
237
237
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Datsun
Datsun
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025607.xml
advertisement
239
239
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
VF Corporation, H. D. Lee Company
VF Corporation, H. D. Lee Company
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025608.xml
advertisement
241
241
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R.J.Reynolds Tobacco Company
Tobacco
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025609.xml
article
243
243
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Claude Smith
[no value]
200050_19711201_025610.xml
article
244
244
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Minchaud
[no value]
200050_19711201_025611.xml
article
245
245
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robert Censoni
[no value]
200050_19711201_025612.xml
article
246
246,247
News
[no value]
Playboy Potpourri
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Historic Occasion
200050_19711201_025613.xml
advertisement
249
249
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Interior Systems
Systems
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025614.xml
article
251
251
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gahan Wilson
[no value]
200050_19711201_025615.xml
article
252
252
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Cliff Roberts
[no value]
200050_19711201_025616.xml
article
253
253
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Bill Lee
[no value]
200050_19711201_025617.xml
advertisement
255
255
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jack Daniel Distillery, Lem Motlow, Prop., Inc.
Jack Daniel Distillery, Lem Motlow, Prop., Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025618.xml
article
257
257
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Virgil Partch
[no value]
200050_19711201_025619.xml
advertisement
259
259
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Bell & Howell
Bell & Howell
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025620.xml
article
260
260
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Bruce Cochran
[no value]
200050_19711201_025621.xml
article
261
261
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Bernard Handelsman
[no value]
200050_19711201_025622.xml
article
263
263
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Charles Rodrigues
[no value]
200050_19711201_025623.xml
advertisement
265
265
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Sperry Rand Corp.
Sperry Rand Corp.
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025624.xml
advertisement
267
267
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Philip Morris Inc.
Philip Morris Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025625.xml
article
269
269
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Donald Reilly
[no value]
200050_19711201_025626.xml
article
270
270
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gahan Wilson
[no value]
200050_19711201_025627.xml
article
271
271
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Ruge
[no value]
200050_19711201_025628.xml
article
273
273
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Don Madden
[no value]
200050_19711201_025629.xml
advertisement
274
274,275
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The James B.Beam Distilling Co.
The James B.Beam Distilling Co.
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025630.xml
advertisement
277
277
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
United States Tobacco Company
Tobacco
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025631.xml
advertisement
279
279
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Holland House
House
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025632.xml
advertisement
281
281
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Beefeater
Beefeater
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025633.xml
advertisement
WS5
WS5
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Western States Bankcard Association
Western States Bankcard Association
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025634.xml
advertisement
WS6
WS6
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Suntory Royal Whisky.
Whisky
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025635.xml
advertisement
WS7
WS7
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The West's Largest Mutual Insurance Company
The West's Largest Mutual Insurance Company
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025636.xml
advertisement
WS8
WS8
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Ampex Corporation
Ampex Corporation
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025637.xml
article
283
283
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Eldon Dedini
[no value]
200050_19711201_025638.xml
article
284
284
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Al Kaufman
[no value]
200050_19711201_025639.xml
article
285
285
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Bernard Kliban
[no value]
200050_19711201_025640.xml
article
287
287
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Sidney Harris
[no value]
200050_19711201_025641.xml
advertisement
289
289
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Find Yourself In The Air Force
Find Yourself In The Air Force
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025642.xml
article
291
291
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Michael Ffolkes
[no value]
200050_19711201_025643.xml
advertisement
292
292
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dupont Reg, T.M.
Dupont Reg, T.M.
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025644.xml
article
295
295
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Lee Lorenz
[no value]
200050_19711201_025645.xml
article
297
297
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Roy Raymonde
[no value]
200050_19711201_025646.xml
article
298
298
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
George Booth
[no value]
200050_19711201_025647.xml
article
299
299
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Herb Green
[no value]
200050_19711201_025648.xml
advertisement
301
301
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GAF
GAF
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025649.xml
article
303
303
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Don Orehek
[no value]
200050_19711201_025650.xml
article
304
304
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Buck Brown
[no value]
200050_19711201_025651.xml
article
305
305
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Howard Shoemaker
[no value]
200050_19711201_025652.xml
advertisement
307
307
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy Press
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025653.xml
article
308
308
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Malcolm Hancock
[no value]
200050_19711201_025654.xml
article
311
311
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Bernard Handelsman
[no value]
200050_19711201_025655.xml
advertisement
313
313
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025656.xml
article
315
315
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
William Hamilton
[no value]
200050_19711201_025657.xml
article
317
317
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Francis Wilford-Smith
[no value]
200050_19711201_025658.xml
advertisement
318
318,319
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025659.xml
advertisement
321
321
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Latest U.S, Government Figures
Figures
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025660.xml
advertisement
323
323
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GE Service
GE Service
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025661.xml
advertisement
324
324
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Kodak Instamatic
Kodak Instamatic
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025662.xml
advertisement
325
325
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Kodak Carousel Hprojector
Kodak Carousel Hprojector
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025663.xml
advertisement
327
327
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy's Playmate Calendar
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025664.xml
article
329
329
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Rowland B. Wilson
[no value]
200050_19711201_025665.xml
advertisement
331
331
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025666.xml
advertisement
333
333
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
House Of Edgeworth
House Of Edgeworth
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025667.xml
article
334
334
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Interlandi
[no value]
200050_19711201_025668.xml
article
337
337
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Buck Brown
[no value]
200050_19711201_025669.xml
article
339
339
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Michael Ffolkes
[no value]
200050_19711201_025670.xml
article
340
340
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Brian Savage
[no value]
200050_19711201_025671.xml
article
341
341
News
[no value]
My Last Mugging
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Murray Kempton
We are all addicts in various stages of degradation where I live on the Upper West Side, some to heroin, some to small dogs and some to The New York Times. The heroin is cut, the dogs are paranoid and the Times cheats by skimping on the West Coast ball scores. No matter; each of us goes upon the street solely in pursuit of his own particular curse.
200050_19711201_025672.xml
article
342
342,343,344,345
Cartoon
[no value]
Little Annie Fanny
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Harvey Kurtzman
Will Elder
Miss Fanny! How can I teach Kinesics when your Kinesics are Continually Interrupting my Kinesics!
200050_19711201_025673.xml
advertisement
346
346
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025674.xml
advertisement
C3
C3
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp.
Tobacco
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025675.xml
advertisement
C4
C4
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Chrysler
Chrysler
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025676.xml
advertisement
48
48
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Eau Sauvage
Eau Sauvage
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025677.xml
advertisement
346
346
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Next Month
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19711201_025678.xml