Issue: 19670901

Friday, September 1, 1967
000165
September
9
True
14
Sunday, July 13, 2014
8/4/2016 12:37:13 AM

Articles
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Cover
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[The following text appears on the cover]
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Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation
Cigarette
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American Wool Council
Council
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200050_19670901_016104.xml
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Firestone
Firestone
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article
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From the Editor
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Playbill
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"There is a harmony in autumn, and a luster in its sky," rhapsodized arch-romantic Percy Shelley; but Wisconsin coed Bo Bussmann, the football-togged damsel gracing our cover, signifies another season of mayhem on collegiate athletic fields. (The well-rounded Miss Bussmann also helps display our back-to-campus attire shown elsewhere in this issue.) Playboy's Pigskin Preview, our annual crystal-balling, compiled for the tenth time by staffer Anson Mount, who last year topped all other football forecasters in accuracy by correctly picking 14 of the nation's top 20 elevens (according to the Wyatt Summary of Pre-Season Pigskin Picks, which honored him with an appropriate plaque), provides a perfect prelude to the carnage.
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masthead
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Copyright
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General Offices: Playboy Building, 919 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60611. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts. Drawings and photographs submitted if they are to be returned and no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited materials. Contents Copyrighted © 1967 by HMH Publishing Co., Inc. All Rights Reserved. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without written permission from the Publisher. Any similarity between the people and places in the fiction and semifiction in this magazine and any real people and places is purely coincidental. Credits: Cover: Model Bo Bussmann, Photography by J. Barry O'Rourke. Other Photography by: Gene Anthony, P. 115; Bill Arsenault, P. 3; Robert K. Bailey, P. 115 (3); Frank Bez, P. 106-108 (4); June De Baun, P. 3; Dwight Hooker, P. 3; Carl Iri, P. 3; Marvin Koner, P. 183; NBC, P. 111 (7): J. Barry O'Rourke, P. 115, 183; Richard Saunders, P. 3, 83; Alfred Sundel, P. 3; Jay Thompson, P. 107-109 (3); UPI, P. 111; Alexas Urba, P. 163; Julian Wasser, P. 3; Jerry Yulsman, P. 3, 182.
200050_19670901_016107.xml
masthead
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Masthead
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Masthead
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Hugh M. Hefner editor and publisher
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tableOfContents
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Table of Contents
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Contents for the Men's Entertainment Magazine
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Playbill .......... 3
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Drummond
Drummond
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6,7
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Kayser-Roth
Belts
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200050_19670901_016111.xml
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Wilbur Ellis Co.
Jose Cuervo
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Lanvin Parfums
Parfum
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article
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9,10,12,14,16,18,22
Letters to the Editor
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Dear Playboy
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Address Playboy Magazine • Playboy Building, 919 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60611
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other
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Indicia
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Indicia
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Playboy, September, 1967, Vol. 14, No. 9, Published Monthly by HMH Publishing Co., Inc., Playboy Building, 919 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60611. Subscriptions: In the U. S., its possessions, The Pan American Union and Canada, $20 for three years, $16 for two years, $8 for one year. Elsewhere add $4.60 per year for foreign postage. Allow 30 days for new subscriptions and renewals. Change of address: Send both old and new addresses to Playboy, Playboy building, 919 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60611, and allow 30 days for change. Advertising: Howard W. Lederer, Advertising Director; Jules Kase, Associate Advertising Manager, 405 Park Ave., New York, New York 10022, MU 8-3030; Sherman Keats, Chicago Manager, 919 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60611, MI 2-1000. Detroit, Joseph Guenther, Manager, 2990 West Grand Boulevard, TR 5-7250; Los Angeles, Stanley L. Perkins, Manager, 8721 Beverly Boulevard, OL 2-8790; San Francisco, Robert E. Stephens, Manager, 110 Sutter Street, YU 2-7994; Southeastern Representative, Pirnie & Brown, 3108 Piedmont Rd., N.E., Atlanta, GA. 30305, 233-6729.
200050_19670901_016115.xml
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Renfield Importers, Ltd.
Haig
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H.i.s
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Revlon
Revlon
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H.i.s
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Metropolis Brewery Of N.J., Inc.
Metropolis Brewery Of N.J., Inc.
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H.i.s
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Datsun
Datsun
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Mennen Speed Stick
Speed Stick
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RCA Victor Record Club
Rca Victor
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Lord Jeff
Lord Jeff
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Heublein
Smirnoff
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American Honda Motor Co., Inc.
Honda
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review
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25,26,30
Review
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Playboy After Hours
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Though the recollection of immortal moments in film history--such as the scene in To Have and Have Not where Bacall tells Bogart, "If you want anything, just whistle"--has long been a favorite parlor game for movie buffs, the great treasure-trove of dramatic moments in Hollywood's lesser-known productions has, for some reason, been virtually untapped. A list of deathless--and lifeless--lines that have escaped critical notice, we feel, might well include such poignant pronouncements on l'amour as Johnny Sheffield's down-to-earth description of the eternal triangle in The Lost Volcano (1950): "Bomba like David--Nona like David--Bomba like Nona"; Patricia Livingston's poetic evocation to Audie Murphy, of Cupid's bull's-eye shot in The Guns of Fort Petticoat (1957): "When I saw you come riding in, it was like a dam busting inside me"; Robert Clarke's pulse-pounding discovery that his lady employer in Secret File--Hollywood (1962) is all woman: "I knew there was more than ice behind those glasses--if I could ever catch you with them off"; and John Eldridge's rueful reflection, addressed to Bette Davis in Dangerous (1935): "I'm a bookkeeper now, Joyce, in the company that I used to own. The worst of it is that I can't hate you." A classic revelation of the creative moment is Gene Raymond's composition of an instant hit in Flying Down to Rio (1933): "She's like an orchid--and there's the moonlight--Orchids in the Moonlight!" The irrationality of human prejudice is crystallized in Stuart Randall's mordant exclamation to Robert Clarke in Captive Women (1952): "The only good mutate is a dead one!" Man's helplessness--syntactically as well as emotionally--before the unknown is eloquently exemplified by the police commissioner's ominous announcement in Konga (1961): "There's a huge monster that's constantly growing to outlandish proportions loose in the streets!" An admirable example of imperturbability, on the other hand, is provided by a delivery boy matter-of-factly checking an order with a nurse in Attack of the 50 Ft. Woman (1958): "Meat hooks--fifty feet of chain--an elephant syringe." Appropriate at this point, we feel, would be Tony Curtis' insightful observation in Son of Ali Baba (1952), spoken in pure Bronxese: "I sense an evil hand has wrought this chain of circumstances"; and William Harrigan's Jovian indictment of Claude Rains' transparent transgressions in Invisible Man (1933): "He meddled in things men should leave alone"--a line we wish we'd heard before we compiled this list.
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Hitachi Sales Corporation
Hitachi
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The London Fog Production
A London Fog
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The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company
Good Year
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Dep
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review
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Review-Books
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Books
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Edmund Wilson is one of the last aristocratic radicals. His radicalism is based on a dedication to stable values, a firm sense of personal character and the old-fashioned virtues of intellectual curiosity and discipline, clarity and conviction. His literary criticism, far from exhibiting the glib formulas of the popularizers or the esoteric trivialities of the academics, reflects both sound scholarship and humane insight. Yet his journal of his early years is somewhat stuffy and stiff-necked--as if those high starched collars had kept him from losing his head. To adopt the prevailing tone of A Prelude (Farrar, Straus & Giroux), Wilson was rather a solemn youth. His entries consist largely of sepia family portraits, callow bons mots, pretentious exercises in landscape writing, soberly earnest reflections on literature, and the tedious pomp and banal circumstance of school life. Fortunately, he admits, "my notations were scrappy, and I have had to fill them in with something in the nature of reminiscences," and these passages are by far the best part of the volume. But Wilson has a lucid, steady, armchair mind suited to criticism rather than to creativity--a point well illustrated by the companion volume, which reprints Galahad (a story about the sexual timidity of a boy in a puritanical prep school, unfortunately much funnier than Wilson intends) and I Thought of Daisy (a novel of Greenwich Village in the Twenties, rigidly "literary" and as dated as an antimacassar). Yet the book also reveals how Wilson, in post--World War One America, the social aristocracy gone, moved so easily into the aristocracy of the intellect, keeping pace with life by discarding his insularities and prejudices, yet linking, as the best critics do, the radical insights of the new to the enduring values of the old.
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Cigar Co., Inc.
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Corbin, Ltd
Corbin
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Ponder & Best
After
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Pearl Brewing Company
Beer
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Kings Men
King Man
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Towne And King Ltd.
Towne And King
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Esquire Socks
Esquire Socks
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Harley-Davidson
Harley-Davidson
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Beaunit Corp.
Beaunit
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Curlee Clothing Co.
Conterfield
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Allied Impex Corp.
Bauer
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Falstaff Brewing Corp.
Falstaff
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Bath Talc
Bath Talc
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Westclox
Westclox
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Hart Schaffner & Marx
Hart Schaffner&Marx
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Burris Manufacturing Co.
Burris
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review
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Review-Dining-Drinking
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Dining-Drinking
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When San Franciscans go out of town for dinner, they usually take the Golden Gate Bridge to one of the Sausalito restaurants where it is possible to dine while gazing back across the water at the city. Le Vivoir (156 Bulkley Avenue) is a French restaurant in a 100-year-old house that hangs on the downside of a Sausalito hill and looks not at San Francisco but at a yacht-studded harbor. Yet Le Vivoir (the living room) is a spot everyone can imagine he discovered for himself. The chef speaks no English, refuses to leave the kitchen and is a woman. She is Marie-Louise. Her husband, Robert, is the maitre de; her daughter, an attractive young brunette, Marie-France, is the hostess and general talker of English to non-Gallic parties. A son and a grandmother are also involved. Robert is from Le Perreux on the outskirts of Paris. Because they are not yet American citizens, they cannot get a liquor license. For that martini or Scotch before dinner, it is simple enough to try the bar at the Alta Mira Hotel and then cross over to the downside of the street for dinner at Le Vivoir. The house has an extraordinary wine list. It favors the Bordeaux wines; but, more important, it is possible to order the fine California wines, such as the Beaulieu Cabernet Sauvignon Private Reserve 1961, that are rarely seen on local retailers' shelves. Duck with an olive sauce (Canard de l'Esterel), at $15 for two, is the pride of the house. This same duck can be served with a cherry sauce, for those who prefer baser canards. The menu is filled with the expected French dishes--Coquille St. Jacques, Escargots de Bourgogne, Les Pigeons de Berville and Coqau Vin--all handled extremely well. The Medaillon Bergerac, slices of fine beef served in a rare sauce, is a splendid dish. The atmosphere lifts Le Vivoir beyond that of just another fine French restaurant. Le Vivoir is literally the living room of an old house; the library and entrance hall have become the lounge, where one may have an aperitif or champagne cocktail; the extensive porch areas have been enlarged for veranda dining on summer nights. The remaining floors of the old house have been turned into a typical French country inn by the owners. There are 14 immaculate rooms whose bed pillows are rolled French style; a provincial desk lists the credit cards accepted; and a sign, representing solid Gallic business practice, bears the words No Personal Checks Cashed. Dinner reservations are necessary for those who want a table near the window. A dinner for two, including wine, will run about $25 including tip. Open every day except Monday, from 6 P.M. Remember--when the distinguished-looking maitre de gives you the Continental greeting, he doesn't understand a word you're saying. If you're stuck with English, ask for Marie-France before you get into the fine demands of the evening's repast.
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Mack Shirt Corp.
Shirt
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Old Hickory Distillers Co.
Old Hickory
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review
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44,46,48,51,52
Review-Recorded Music
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Recordings
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Still serving up bountiful batches of soul is the nonpareil Lou Rawls. This go-round, it's Too Much! (Capitol), which finds Lou doing some talking (monologs have now become a familiar part of the Rawls repertoire) but mostly singing. Among the high points are a pair of tunes by John Loudermilk--You're Takin' My Bag and Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye--and the lovely old I Wanna Little Girl.
200050_19670901_016155.xml
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Forum
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Weyenberg Shoe Mfg. Co.
Shoes
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Parfum Lorle, Inc.
Parffum
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Truval Shirt Co.
Shirts
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Carillon Importers, Ltd.
Grand marnier
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Admiral
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The Wool Bureau Inc.
Pure Virgin Wool
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Manhattan
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Dopp Kit
Dopp Kit
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Rooster, Inc.
Roosters
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Resilio
Resilio
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review
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52,53,55,58,60,62,63,64
Review-Films
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Movies
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As you've probably heard, Sean Connery is bored with playing James Bond. It is clear from the detachment of his performance in You Only Live Twice. Nor is Connery alone in his languor. Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman, those perfectly--if incredibly--named dishers-up of the Bond exploits, are beginning to run out of inventive ways to do what they do. Their present effort is somewhat lacking in the wit and verbal crunch of its predecessors and relies on larger, nuclear explosions. The bombs bursting in air burst very well, indeed, but interest flags when most of the action is in the careening of blasted bodies. As Playboy readers know, the topography this time is Japan's, and it is handsome, as are a couple of the Nipponese ladies with whom Bond tangles--Akiko Wakabayashi, who succumbs prettily to poison dripped down a string, and Mie Hama, the only bra-wearing lady pearl diver in Japan, who survives. (You saw a preview of them both in the June Playboy.) There are crisp scenes--a vividly photographed sumo wrestling match, a tour of supposed police training grounds, where the lads work out at judo, karate and kendo with impressive enthusiasm, and a splendid encounter between the newest supergadget--a minicopter called Little Nell--and The Forces of Evil. There is merit, too, in the eerie opening scene before the titles. But too much of the action focuses on aluminum tubes, underground laboratories and spacecraft--and all of them go bang-bang-bang at once in a scene far too reminiscent of Dr. No. The capable Donald Pleasence throws away a bit part as Blofeld by doing him in plastic scar and mad-scientist cackle. Even the serene source of Bond's international misdeeds has lost his cool. M is now disclosed many fathoms deep in Hong Kong harbor, clanging about in the bowels of a submarine marked M-1. Cute but bad form and hardly worthy of Her Majesty's Secret Service.
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Harbor Master Ltd.
Harbor Master
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Blue Bell Inc.
Wrebels
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Jaymar-Ruby, Inc.
Dacron
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Jaymar-Ruby, Inc.
Jaymar
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PWM
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Sony
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R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
Cigarette
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Blue Bell Inc.
Wrainbow
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016175.xml
advertisement
61
61
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Reacts
Reacts
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016176.xml
advertisement
62
62
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Wigwam Mills, Inc.
Wigwam
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016177.xml
advertisement
62
62
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Vivitar
Vivitar
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016178.xml
advertisement
63
63
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Hicks-Ponder Co.
Hicks
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016179.xml
advertisement
64
64
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. & A. Gilbey, Ltd.
Gibey's Vodka
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016180.xml
advertisement
64
64
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Sero
Sero
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016181.xml
advertisement
65
65
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Glen Oaks
Broomsticks
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016182.xml
advertisement
66
66
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The British Motor Corp.
Car
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016183.xml
advertisement
67
67
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Fabergé
Shower
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016184.xml
article
67
67,68,70,72
Reader QA
[no value]
The Playboy Advisor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Recently, I saw the excellent film version of James Joyce's classic novel Ulysses and was puzzled by a phrase uttered by Molly during her soliloquy toward the end. Looking through her husband's wallet, she commented that she might find a "French letter." The implication was that this letter would be evidence of infidelity on Bloom's part, yet there was no other reference during the film to any possible cross-Channel correspondence. Can you enlighten me?--M. W., New York, New York.
200050_19670901_016185.xml
advertisement
68
68
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Piedmont Shirt Co., Inc.
Golden Vee
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016186.xml
advertisement
68
68
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Silver Mfg. Co.
Securoslax
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016187.xml
advertisement
69
69
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dexter Shoe Company
Dexter
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016188.xml
advertisement
70
70
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Cologne
Colognes
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016189.xml
advertisement
70
70
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Orlon
Orlon
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016190.xml
advertisement
71
71
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. & A. Gilbey, Ltd.
Gin
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016191.xml
advertisement
72
72
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Cutty Sark Glasses
Cutty Sark
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016192.xml
advertisement
72
72
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Croton Watch Co.
Croton
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016193.xml
advertisement
73
73
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Trans World Airlines, Inc.
Trans World Airlines
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016194.xml
advertisement
74
74
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Seagram Distillers Co.
Whiskey
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016195.xml
advertisement
75
75
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Cresco
Cresco
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016196.xml
review
75
75
Review
[no value]
Playboy's International Datebook
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Patrick Chase
As New Ski Spas continue to sprout throughout the French Alps, France this fall and winter promises to become the Continent's most cosmopolitan ski center. The Hôtel Du Mont-d'Arbois, located close by the slopes at Megève, exemplifies the affluent new wave of France's opulent Alpine accommodations. Offering guests outdoor swimming in a heated pool, the Mont-d'Arbois enhances its appeal with such appurtenances as a fully equipped gymnasium, skating rinks, a sauna room, a fine restaurant overlooking the ski runs and a cluster of chic boutiques representing the expensive entrepreneurs of Paris' famed Faubourg-St. Honoré. In addition to the droves of French demoiselles always in attendance, Megève also plays host to a swinging set of young Swiss and Italians, whose countries are less than a 45-minute drive away.
200050_19670901_016197.xml
advertisement
76
76
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jantzen Inc.
Jantzen
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016198.xml
advertisement
77
77
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The National Brewing Co.
Liquor
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016199.xml
article
77
77,78,79,80,81,184,185,186
Reader Discussion
[no value]
The Playboy Forum
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Sexual Safety
200050_19670901_016200.xml
advertisement
80
80
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Merit Clothing Company
Merit
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016201.xml
advertisement
81
81
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Mem Company, Inc.
Shower
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016202.xml
advertisement
81
81
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Admiral
Admiral
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016203.xml
advertisement
82
82
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Fiber Industries, Inc.
Fortrel
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016204.xml
article
83
83,84,85,86,88,90,94,96,98,100
Playboy Interview
[no value]
John V. Lindsay
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
During his campaign for mayor of New York in the spring of 1965, John Vliet Lindsay often told audiences how he had boarded a New York--bound train in Washington and found himself in a car full of grim, unsmiling men with arms folded across their chests. "Who are they?" he asked the conductor. "They're patients going to an insane asylum," came the answer. "And where are you going?" "To New York to run for mayor," said the candidate. "Then," replied the conductor, "you stay right here." In the opinion of most political observers at the time, the conductor had a point. As far as they were concerned, the idealistic, Yale-educated young Congressman seemed to be courting almost certain defeat in pursuing a job that had won a richly deserved reputation as a graveyard for rising political hopefuls. As a Republican, he also had to face the fact that New York had not elected a member of his party since Fiorello La Guardia in the Thirties.
200050_19670901_016205.xml
advertisement
84
84
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robert Reis And Co.
Reis
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016206.xml
advertisement
85
85
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Cantebbury Belts Ltd.
Canterbury's
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016207.xml
advertisement
85
85
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Plymouth Shoe Company
Shoe
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016208.xml
advertisement
86
86
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aqua Velva
Aqua Velva
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016209.xml
advertisement
87
87
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Theatre Recording Society
Marat
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016210.xml
advertisement
89
89
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The American Tobacco Company
Cigarette
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016211.xml
advertisement
91
91
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jos. Schlitz Brewing Company
Beer
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016212.xml
advertisement
92
92,93
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Campus Sweater & Sportswear Company
Campus
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016213.xml
advertisement
95
95
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Clubman
Clubman
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016214.xml
advertisement
97
97
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Studebaker Corporation
Stp
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016215.xml
advertisement
99
99
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Cricketeer
Cricketeer
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016216.xml
advertisement
101
101
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016217.xml
article
103
102,103,104,110,248,249,250,251,252,254,255,256
Feature
[no value]
A Small Buffet in Maldita
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Harry Brown
They got me to Marian Delmore's party, in the end--but only under duress and over my own dead body.
200050_19670901_016218.xml
article
105
105
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Eldon Dedini
[no value]
200050_19670901_016219.xml
pictorial
106
106,107,108,109
Pictorial
[no value]
The Trip
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LSD had to happen in Hollywood sooner or later--and it has turned out to be right now. Audiences are getting their first look at a film version of an ultimate acidhead experience. The Trip, currently on view across America, is a series of cinematic psychedelicacies mirroring the ecstasies and aberrations of an LSD joy ride.
200050_19670901_016220.xml
article
111
111,162,164,166,167,170,171,172,175,176,177,178,179
Feature
[no value]
The Watts Workshop
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Budd Schulberg
It was black friday, the 13th of August, 1965. Like millions of other dazed or complacent Angelenos, I was watching an unscheduled "spectacular," the damnedest television show ever put on the tube. Not long before, I had written an introduction for a new edition of The Day of the Locust, in which Nathanael West projects a Hollywood art director whose masterwork is an apocalyptic canvas entitled The Burning of Los Angeles. West's painter saw his vapid, vicious city consuming itself in angry flames. Here, on television, in prime time--in fact, around the clock for eight days that shook not only Los Angeles but the entire country--was Nathanael West's nightmare vision as if it had leaped from the canvas and was coming live from Watts.
200050_19670901_016221.xml
article
112
112,113,114,224,225,226,228,229,230,232,234
Humor
[no value]
The Secret Mission of the Blue-Assed Buzzard
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jean Shepherd
The Bronzed, weather-beaten face smiled at me from the ad, teeth white and even; ice-blue eyes magnetic--those of a particularly alert, responsible eagle--surrounded by thin care lines from long hours of staring into the yawning sky. He wore a jaunty dark-blue cap slashed by broad golden wings, and looked directly at me, or rather through me, from the cockpit window of a sleek silver jet. The caption read:
200050_19670901_016222.xml
article
115
115,116,117,118,120,240,241,242,244,246,247
Feature
[no value]
Playboy's Pigskin Preview
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Anson Mount
In the Dog Days of late August, thousands of brawny young men wend their way back to campuses to begin three weeks of head knocking before the first kickoff. At the same time, millions of football fans begin combing sports pages for some hint of what the coming season's tribal warfare will bring. Will the good guys beat the bad guys again (or at last)? Will ignominious defeats at the hands of the arrogant enemy be avenged? The suspense grows until the first referee's whistle blows and the battle is joined. Then, every Saturday for three months, millions of rabid fans savor the sweet taste of victory or endure the humiliation of defeat at no physical risk to themselves and with immeasurable therapeutic value. At least, so goes the theory of some tower-bound (text continued on page 118) psychologists who have recently decided that football contributes greatly to the mass mental health of the American population. This fascinating thesis runs thusly: While modern man's intellect has enabled him to build a highly technical and civilized society, his body and emotions are best fitted for cave dwelling. Modern man smiles sweetly at his neighbor while he burns inside with restrained hostility and tension. Grandfather Piltdown went out and clubbed a sabertooth to death every now and then or he went charging off to ravage a neighboring tribe, thereby satisfying his combative instinct. Purged of his natural hostility, he could live between battles in sweet tranquility.
200050_19670901_016223.xml
article
119
119
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Dempsey
[no value]
200050_19670901_016224.xml
article
121
121,160,236,237,238
Feature
[no value]
Testimony in the Proceedings Concerning Edward Darwin Caparell
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Ken W. Purdy
Lucas Stiver: I always thought Ed was a real stable fellow, steady, even-going, you know; but I think now I was just a victim of the common delusion that the stolid, quiet type of character never goes off the track. I've learned a lot listening to Dr. Pike's testimony here and, looking back, I can see things that should have meant more to me at the time they happened. Like one real cold morning last winter, we came out of Grand Central together. It was a brutal day, about 15 degrees below, and blowing hard, lots of snow. When we got to the building it was ten o'clock and there was nobody else in the elevator. Ed hit the 36 button and it lit up and then he hit the Door Close button. Nothing happened, of course, (continued on page 160)testimony in the proceedings(continued from page 121) because the car was programed for so many seconds' wait on the ground floor, and Ed looked up at the ceiling and said, "All right, you son of a bitch, let go of it!" And he stuck his middle finger up, you know. At the time, I didn't think anything about it, but I can see now, it was a little extreme in the circumstances.
200050_19670901_016225.xml
article
122
122,123
Feature
[no value]
Best Face Forward
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016226.xml
article
124
124
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dink Siegel
[no value]
200050_19670901_016227.xml
article
125
125,214,216,217,218,219,220,222
Feature
[no value]
Please Don't Talk to Me--I'm in Training
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robert Kaufman
A graying, rather pudgy, casually dressed (expensive black-cashmere sports jacket and light-gray slacks) executive in his late 40s sat behind the large period desk. His name was Mr. Gelber. His hands were folded. He was smiling.
200050_19670901_016228.xml
pictorial
126
126,127,128,129,130-132,133
Playmate
[no value]
Angela Dorian, Miss September, 1967
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Curt Gunther
When Newton Minow, former FCC chairman, made the trenchant observation that TV was a wasteland, it's a cinch he wasn't thinking of Angela Dorian, our September Playmate. Though she agrees with Minow about the general banality of TV (she doesn't own a set), Angela's an established television actress, a veteran of 26 shows--including Bonanza, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Perry Mason, Run for Your Life, Big Valley, Hogan's Heroes--who doesn't even have to read for parts. Currently, though, Angela's in the process of making her transition to the larger screen: This past summer, she made her cinema debut as a co-star in Chuka, a rough-and-tumble Western featuring Rod Taylor and Ernest Borgnine. "In TV," the former UCLA coed avers, "you have to get things perfect in a hurry; but when you're making a film, you have more time--and you get more attention. Acting for TV is great preparation for the movies." The articulate Miss Dorian is a well-rounded (36-21-35) artist--a jazz and ballet dancer, a song-writer, singer and guitar player in the folk-rock bag (at presstime, negotiations for a recording contract were under way) and an occasional graphic artist, specializing in ink sketches. Miss September's song-writing, she told us, evolved from a prior interest in language, specifically that of poetry: "I just began setting my verses to music." She did her own singing--a Spanish folk song--on one Big Valley segment; early in her career, on her agents' advice, she declined to dub for Natalie Wood as Maria in West Side Story: "I auditioned for the part myself, but they didn't think I was box office--and I didn't want to get hung up in a stand-by role." The nonsinging part of Lolita in the same-name motion picture was also considered--and bypassed--by Angela, who didn't feel ready to capitalize on herself as a nymphet. When Angela finds time to fill up a sketch pad, she calls on old Sol for inspiration: "I'm crazy about the sun. It's so impossibly ancient, warm and beautiful. I keep the wall over my fireplace covered with images and replicas of the sun. There's one that I carved out of wood and another that I made of papier-mâché. It's a big joke among my friends." Sun worship isn't the only mystical preoccupation of this 22-year-old Thespian, who's steeped in star lore and who believes in reincarnation: "In one of my former lives, I must have been a cat, because when I purse my lips, I can pass for one. I also purr like a cat." A more prosaic side of Angela's many-splendored life is her career as a landlady. She owns and rents out a duplex in Burbank, whose tenants are blissfully unaware of her star status; but although she delights in such round-the-house chores as gardening ("Too many people today are afraid to bend over and touch the earth"), Angela plans to sell the property: "It gives me too many headaches." When she's not fussing over her building or pursuing one of her myriad muses, Angela digs burning up the road in her newly acquired Porsche or her second car, a Sprite ("I like to get behind the wheel and just travel--to Monterey, Carmel or San Francisco"); she's had the experience, thanks to a friend who races at Santa Barbara, of winging around the track herself a few times. Her affection for life on wheels, however, doesn't embrace the antisocial aspects of motorcycling. Angela, whose idea of success includes being able to choose her own movie parts, recently refused a role in a motorcycle epic because she felt the character was too "hard." "Important as my career is to me," she explained, "I'm a woman first. I like to think of myself as being open to the world, brimming with love and music. Some aspiring actresses think only of their careers, and they're just setting themselves up for eventual disappointments." Angela, herself, matured under the spell of show business: Her mother, a native of Rome, is a former Broadway actress who's still active as a club singer in the Sunset Boulevard environs; her father, who was born in Sicily, is an L.A. restaurateur. Angela admits a desire to live and make films in Italy: "I'm fluent in Italian, so the language wouldn't be any problem. I also feel that European movies are generally better than Hollywood's offerings." We wish Angela the best in such enterprises, as well as in her search for the ideal male. "I don't really believe there is such a person, but I'm looking for him anyway," she declares--an affirmation that we're sure will give heart to our readers.
200050_19670901_016229.xml
article
134
134
Humor
[no value]
Playboy's Party Jokes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The woman was enthusiastic over psychoanalysis and confided to a friend that she had undergone therapy. "You never knew this," she said, "but for years I was under the delusion that I was a fox terrier."
200050_19670901_016230.xml
article
135
135
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Alden Erikson
[no value]
200050_19670901_016231.xml
article
136
136,137,138,188,190,191,192,195,196,197
Feature
[no value]
Youth--The Oppressed Majority
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Nat Hentoff
To most adults who read about it, the analogy must have seemed preposterous. Here was John Lindsay, the mayor of New York, actually telling a group of Princeton undergraduates last November that they were like black youngsters in a ghetto. "The distance between these groups--educationally, economically, socially--has certain psychological bridges," he said. "The frustration of the sophomore alienated from his university by its size and impersonality is not very much different from the resentment of the ghetto youth who is alienated from his city because its opportunities and rewards are foreclosed to him. Both suffer the malady of powerlessness--powerlessness in the face of huge, authoritarian institutions that routinely cause fundamental dislocations in the lives of the people they affect each day."
200050_19670901_016232.xml
review
139
139,140,141,142,143,144,180,181
Buyers Guide
[no value]
Back to Campus
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robert L. Green
Once again, collegians from coast to coast are confronted with a pleasantly weighty decision: what clothes should be purchased and what ones should be parted with prior to convening at the campus of their choice. For even though most schools spawn a spate of stylish fads and foibles that are as locally acceptable as they are unpredictable, fashion-conscious students still give national and regional clothing norms the nod when filling the sartorial holes in their wardrobe collections.
200050_19670901_016233.xml
article
145
145,200,201,202,204,206,207
Feature
[no value]
The Courtship
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Isaac Bashevis Singer
After the unsuccessful rebellion of 1863, many Polish noblemen were hanged; others--Count Wladislaw Jampolski among them--were banished to Siberia. The czar's soldiers led the count in chains through the streets of Jampol, the town that bore his name.
200050_19670901_016234.xml
article
146
146,147,148,235,236
Feature
[no value]
Two Much!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Thomas Mario
In every Gourmet's Almanac, September is an interim month. Charcoal fires have done their summer stint and the long season of pheasant, mallard duck and mountainous rib roasts is still in the planning stage. At this special interval, nothing will hold a roomful of people as spellbound as the aroma of a huge soufflé baking in the oven. And a hearty salad as a supplement will make the culinary coup well-nigh perfect.
200050_19670901_016235.xml
article
149
149,208,210,211,212,213
Feature
[no value]
What's in a Name?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Russ Wallace
From the Desk of Clyde Bagwell (Confidential)
200050_19670901_016236.xml
pictorial
150
150,151,152,153,154,155,156,157
Pictorial
[no value]
Mara Loves
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Blonde, green-eyed Mara Sykes is from all outward appearances, a typical California coed. But typical she is not. Mara's unique combination of physical and philosophical attributes was brought to the attention of Playboy's West Coast photographer by a Sexual Freedom Leaguer who had met Miss Sykes at a Berkeley-chapter party and was duly impressed. We interviewed Mara between her art and sociology courses at Berkeley and her cosmetics-counter duties at a local drugstore and discovered she was one of the most refreshingly open girls we had ever considered featuring--as her quotes here and elsewhere will attest. Says Mara candidly: "People should not be ashamed of their own bodies and fearful of their own natural desires, but should accept them and try to understand them. Most of my pleasures are sense oriented."
200050_19670901_016237.xml
article
158
158
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Alberto Vargas
[no value]
200050_19670901_016238.xml
article
159
159
Ribald Classics
[no value]
Ribald Classics: Dumb Jaime, and How He Spoke
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Of all the grandees at the court of King Alfonso of Aragon, Don Federico was, certainly, the most proud and honorable. His name was an ancient one, and he never forgot the fact that most of his forebears had died in battle for king or Christendom. Don Federico had two great sorrows in life--the death of his wife in childbirth and the thoroughly disappointing son she had given him.
200050_19670901_016239.xml
article
161
161
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Erich Sokol
[no value]
200050_19670901_016240.xml
review
163
163
Buyers Guide
[no value]
Turtlenecks Take Over
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robert L. Green
First-rank restaurants and night spots, including the Playboy Clubs, have now opened their doors to gentlemen who have tastefully coupled a suit or sports coat with a turtleneck. Tableside and tieless in a posh dining room, these two chaps keep both beauty and bubbly close at hand while wearing (left to right): a wool twill two-button shaped suit, by J. Schoeneman, $100, over a wool mock turtleneck, by Catalina Martin, $19; and a corduroy double-breasted suit, with flap pockets and deep side vents, by Stanley Blacker, $70, topped off with a cable wool turtleneck, by Robert Bruce, $18.
200050_19670901_016241.xml
advertisement
165
165
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
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Canada Dry Corporation
Johnnie
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016242.xml
article
166
166
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[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Charles E. Martin
[no value]
200050_19670901_016243.xml
article
167
167
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[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Joseph Farris
[no value]
200050_19670901_016244.xml
advertisement
168
168
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Plymouth Manufacturing Company
Plymouth
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016245.xml
advertisement
169
169
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Theodorus Niemeyer Ltd.
Sail
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016246.xml
article
170
170
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[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Donald Reilly
[no value]
200050_19670901_016247.xml
advertisement
171
171
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Blue Bell, Inc.
Fortrel
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016248.xml
advertisement
173
173
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Van Heusen
Van Heusen
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016249.xml
article
174
174
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[no value]
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[no value]
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John Dempsey
[no value]
200050_19670901_016250.xml
article
176
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[no value]
[no value]
William Hoest
[no value]
200050_19670901_016251.xml
advertisement
177
177
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The American Tobacco Company
Cigarette
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016252.xml
article
178
178
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[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Buck Brown
[no value]
200050_19670901_016253.xml
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179
179
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Mid-States Shoe Company
Crosby Square
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016254.xml
advertisement
180
180
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dacron
Dacron
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016255.xml
advertisement
180
180
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Muter Company
Jensen
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016256.xml
article
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Howard Shoemaker
[no value]
200050_19670901_016257.xml
article
182
182
Profile
[no value]
Neil Simon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Though his childhood wish to be a doctor never materialized, Neil Simon has cured innumerable cases of ennui and melancholy--all with laughter. The 40-year-old Bronx native--son of a garment salesman whose main desire for his sons was security--is securely ensconced as America's funniest playwright (Come Blow Your Horn, Little Me, Barefoot in the Park, The Odd Couple, Sweet Charity, The Star-Spangled Girl). Simon comedies aren't faddishly apocalyptic--they're gentle and familiar. A modest man who claims to be funny only at the typewriter ("I couldn't tell a joke if you put a gun to my head"), Simon works daily in a neat office on East 57th Street, where he laughs at his lines and rewards himself with cookies. He began writing in high school, continued in the Air Force and, after a year in Warner Bros.' mail room, got his start--with older brother Danny--as a gag-writer for Robert Q. Lewis. During a lucrative but tedious decade, "Doc" turned out material for Jerry Lester, Phil Silvers, Sid Caesar, Red Buttons, and revues at Tamiment, the Pennsylvania resort where he met his wife, Joan--but in the early-morning hours, he was busy moonlighting a play about the Simon brothers' efforts to escape their all-too-loving family. The result, Come Blow Your Horn, opened on Broadway in 1961. Today, Simon earns $20,000 a week in royalties (his life, he insists, remains "very ordinary"); he's been the first playwright since 1920 to author four simultaneous Broadway hits; the film of Barefoot in the Park has been released; and The Odd Couple--purchased by Paramount before the play was written, on the strength of Simon's taped synopsis--is now being shot. Currently working on Plaza Suite, a new play in which a middle-aged couple use their onetime honeymoon site to plot their divorce, Simon feels driven to make his creations "more and more human," not to strive for "great social importance." But when plays make people feel it's OK to be human and fallible--as his infallibly do--there's no question about their having social importance.
200050_19670901_016258.xml
article
183
183
Profile
[no value]
Jamie Wyeth
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Since the splash made by the initial exhibit of his paintings last winter at New York's Knoedler Gallery, the 20-year-old son of renowned artist Andrew Wyeth has been patiently plying his art and "waiting for things to calm down." Says Jamie, a practitioner of poetic realism in the tradition of his father and of his grandfather, illustrator N. C. Wyeth, "I was pictured by the press as a white knight charging into the New York art world, and people came to the show with reviews in hand." Jamie's incisively assured style is the product of years of labor; since leaving school after the sixth grade to be privately tutored, he's worked steadily under the critical eye of his father to develop his craft at the family home in the tiny Pennsylvania hamlet of Chadds Ford, where he has his own studio. One of his weekends each month is currently pre-empted by the Air National Guard, for which he wields a paintbrush--illustrating the Guard's magazine; he is also involved in discussing sales prospects for his recently finished painting of John F. Kennedy: "Since the fuss about my uncle Peter Hurd's Presidential portrait, the press can't wait to see mine." Jamie's subjects usually must endure a month and a half of daylong posing, which is why the artist prefers to paint people he knows, and does few commissions: "A portrait has to be in tune with what the model is thinking. You have to remove yourself; the object is the important thing, and each person dictates a different style. My ideal would be to have an exhibit of portraits painted so that visitors to the gallery would think they were all the work of different artists." Jamie, though his idols are his father and the late Edward Hopper, values the work of some pop artists ("It shows a turn back to the representational, since there's more use of the object"), optimistically believes American painting is enjoying a renascence of popular interest: "It's been evident for about three years--the major museums are all so crowded." And Jamie--who paints daily, whether he's "inspired" or not--is doing his best to keep them that way.
200050_19670901_016259.xml
article
183
183
Profile
[no value]
Buddy Rich
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Talking to the eternal drummerboy Bernard "Buddy" Rich--a man who has survived three heart attacks--limp and wet as a noodle in a night-club dressing room between sets, one wonders how he can charge into the fray night after night; but charge he does. Bandleader Rich is the explosive catalyst for an aggregation that is one of the most dynamic and exciting in the biz today ("Why? Because we're playing the 'now' sound. The music of 20 years ago is dead."). Buddy, at 50, spots most of the members of his youthful organization a good quarter century, but bows to no one in energy, outlook and appearance. He has been called a "freak" by an awed member of the drum fraternity, because he practices not at all; yet the consensus is that he still boasts the fastest hands in the business. Nongladhand ("If you like my playing, never mind me") Rich's adventures in the skin trade began when his vaudevillian parents toted their 18-month-old Wunderkind and his drums on stage as part of their act. Five years later, Buddy--billed as "Traps, the Drum Wonder"--was doing a high-priced single on the prestigious Keith circuit. And when Rich was barely old enough to drink the booze at New York's Hickory House, he was playing there with Joe Marsala's band. From Marsala, he moved on to Bunny Berigan, Artie Shaw, the first of his four stints with Tommy Dorsey, and Harry James. It was while with the latter in Las Vegas that Buddy cut the silver cord of being the top-salaried sideman in musicdom and took his current, astonishingly successful flier as a big-band leader. Since the band's debut a little over a year ago, Rich and Company--working a book that ranges from rock to West Side Story--have been S.R.O. in club dates all over this country and in Europe; they've been part of the summer replacement for the Jackie Gleason show and have done concert dates with Frank Sinatra. Not one to hide his talent under a bushel, the tell-it-like-it-is Rich, in pinpointing his current success, says, "I am the greatest!" All we can add is, "Hear! Hear!"
200050_19670901_016260.xml
article
184
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Cartoon
[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Mort Gerberg
[no value]
200050_19670901_016261.xml
article
185
185
Cartoon
[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Herbert Goldberg
[no value]
200050_19670901_016262.xml
article
187
187
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[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gahan Wilson
[no value]
200050_19670901_016263.xml
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189
189
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Justerini & Brooks
Justerini & Brooks
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016264.xml
article
190
190
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[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dana Fradon
[no value]
200050_19670901_016265.xml
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191
191
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Wolverine World Wide, Inc.
Hush Puppies
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016266.xml
advertisement
193
193
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Cone Mills Inc.
Corduroy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016267.xml
article
194
194
Cartoon
[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Doug Sneyd
[no value]
200050_19670901_016268.xml
article
196
196
Cartoon
[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Donald Reilly
[no value]
200050_19670901_016269.xml
advertisement
197
197
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. R. Weaver Co.
Weaver Scopes
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016270.xml
advertisement
197
197
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy Products
Playboy Products
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016271.xml
advertisement
198
198,199
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PMOC
PMOC
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016272.xml
article
200
200
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[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Sidney Harris
[no value]
200050_19670901_016273.xml
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201
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Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Larus & Brother Company, Inc.
Edgeworth
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016274.xml
article
203
203
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[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Buck Brown
[no value]
200050_19670901_016275.xml
advertisement
205
205
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Baylor
Watch
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016276.xml
article
206
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[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Charles E. Martin
[no value]
200050_19670901_016277.xml
advertisement
207
207
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Inver House Distillers, Ltd.
Inver House
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016278.xml
advertisement
209
209
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Acme Boot Company, Inc.
Acme Boots
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016279.xml
article
210
210
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[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dennis Renault
[no value]
200050_19670901_016280.xml
article
211
211
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Donald Reilly
[no value]
200050_19670901_016281.xml
advertisement
212
212
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Ban
Ban
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016282.xml
advertisement
212
212
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Peters Sportswear Co.
Peters
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016283.xml
article
213
213
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[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Donald Reilly
[no value]
200050_19670901_016284.xml
advertisement
215
215
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Kayser-Roth
Jiffies
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016285.xml
article
216
216
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Bernard Handelsman
[no value]
200050_19670901_016286.xml
advertisement
217
217
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy Products
Playboy Products
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016287.xml
advertisement
217
217
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Stardust
Stardust
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016288.xml
article
219
219
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[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Eldon Dedini
[no value]
200050_19670901_016289.xml
article
221
221
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Michael Ffolkes
[no value]
200050_19670901_016290.xml
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223
223
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Worsted-Tex
Worsted-Tex
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016291.xml
article
225
225
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[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Charles E. Martin
[no value]
200050_19670901_016292.xml
advertisement
227
227
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Hans Holterbosch, Inc.
Lowenbrau
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016293.xml
advertisement
229
229
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Carwood Manufacturing Co.
Carwood
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016294.xml
article
231
231
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Francis Wilford-Smith
[no value]
200050_19670901_016295.xml
advertisement
233
233
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Beaunit Corp.
Deep Tread
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016296.xml
advertisement
234
234
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A Berkey Photo Company
Konica
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016297.xml
advertisement
234
234
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy Products
Playboy Products
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016298.xml
article
235
235
Cartoon
[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dennis Renault
[no value]
200050_19670901_016299.xml
article
236
236
Cartoon
[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gahan Wilson
[no value]
200050_19670901_016300.xml
article
237
237
Cartoon
[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Bruce Cochran
[no value]
200050_19670901_016301.xml
advertisement
239
239
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Wright Casuals
Wright Casuals
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016302.xml
article
240
240
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[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Alden Erikson
[no value]
200050_19670901_016303.xml
article
241
241
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[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Charles E. Martin
[no value]
200050_19670901_016304.xml
article
243
243
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Richard Taylor
[no value]
200050_19670901_016305.xml
advertisement
245
245
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Wren Ltd.
Wren Ltd.
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016306.xml
article
246
246
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[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Virgil Partch
[no value]
200050_19670901_016307.xml
advertisement
247
247
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Hardwick Clothes
Hardwick
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016308.xml
advertisement
248
248,249
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Cooper's Inc.
HipBrief
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016309.xml
advertisement
250
250
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dacron
Higgins
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016310.xml
article
251
251
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[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
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Glenn Zulauf
[no value]
200050_19670901_016311.xml
article
253
253
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Interlandi
[no value]
200050_19670901_016312.xml
article
254
254
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[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Francis Wilford-Smith
[no value]
200050_19670901_016313.xml
advertisement
257
257
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy Clubs International
Playboy Club News
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016314.xml
article
258
258,259,260,261
Cartoon
[no value]
Little Annie Fanny
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Harvey Kurtzman
Larry Siegel
Will Elder
Jay Levinson
Welcome, Holy woman...Direct descendant of god on my father's side, Twice removed. Pull up my face and sit down on it so that I may gain shimmering insights into the molecular structure of your sacred sit-sack. Hallelujah! We will now join in silent responsive reading...Amen.Ralphie! Leapin' Lizards! Freaking again! You're on LSD!
200050_19670901_016315.xml
advertisement
262
262
Display Ad
[no value]
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Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016316.xml
article
262
262
[no value]
[no value]
Next Month
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"The New Wave Makers"--A sympathetic portrait of those far-out and fanciful west coast hippies, Diggers and new leftniks who spark today's youth scene--with text by Herbert Gold and photos by Gene Anthony
200050_19670901_016317.xml
advertisement
C3
C3
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Yamaha International Corporation
Yamaha
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016318.xml
advertisement
C4
C4
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gordon's Dry Gin Co., Ltd.
Gin
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19670901_016319.xml