Issue: 19650901

Wednesday, September 1, 1965
000141
September
9
True
12
Saturday, July 12, 2014
8/4/2016 12:33:27 AM

Articles
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[The following text appears on the cover]
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W. & A. Gilbey, Ltd.
Gin
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London Fog
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Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation
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From the Editor
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Playbill
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This September Issue, introduced by Playmate staffer Teddi Smith in her fourth cover appearance, is our biggest (and, we think, our best) back-to-campus number ever. For undergrad and alum alike, we offer our annual Pigskin Preview which, for pictorial purposes, required logistical legerdemain of a high order. Twenty-two players plus coach had to be assembled in one place at one time from distant campuses in California, Florida, Louisiana, New York and points in between. The success of our Photo Department's Operation All-America is attested to by the unique gridiron shots herein. The success of prognosti-cator Anson Mount's predictions (his past picks rank him among the leaders as a teller of football fortunes) will have to be determined in the months ahead.
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Table of Contents
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Contents for the Men's Entertainment Magazine
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Playbill............................................ 3
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Copyright
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General Offices: Playboy Building, 232 E. Ohio Street, Chicago, Illinois 60611. Return Postage Must Accompany All Manuscripts. Drawings and Photographs Submitted if They are to be Returned and No Responsibility can be Assumed for Unsolicited Materials. Contents Copyrighted © 1965 by HMH Publishing Co., Inc. All Rights Reserved. Nothing May be Reprinted in Whole or in Part Without Written Permission from The Publisher. Any Similarity Between The People and Places in The Fiction and Semifiction in This Magazine and any Real People and Places is Purely Coincidental. Credits: Cover: Model Teddi Smith, Photo by Larry Gordon: P. 3 Photos by Pompeo Posar (2), Don Bronstein, Gordon: P. 91 Photos by Desmond Russell; P. 114-115 Photo by J. Barry O'Rourke; P. 119 Photo by Posar; P. 124-125 Photo by Frederick E. Moncrieff; P. 126-127 Photo by O'Rourke; P. 170-177 Photos by Culver Pictures (8), The Bettmann Archive (6), William Claxton (3), Penguin Photo (2), Museum of Modern Art, Louise Brooks, G. Bachmann; P. 186-187 Photos by Mario Casilli, Posar; P. 132-134 Hair-style by Fred's Shears and Cheers, Chicago.
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Masthead
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Masthead
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Hugh M. Hefner editor and publisher
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Van Heusen
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Lanvin
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Letters to the Editor
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Dear Playboy
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Address Playboy Magazine • 232 E. Ohio St., Chicago, Illinois 60611
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Indicia
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Indicia
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Playboy, September, 1965, Vol. 12, No. 9. Published Monthly by HMH Publishing Company, Inc., Playboy Building, 232 E. Ohio St., Chicago, Illinois 60611. Subscriptions: In the U.S., its possessions, the Pan American Union and Canada, $20 for three years, $15 for two years, $8 for one year. Elsewhere add $4.60 per year for foreign postage. Allow 30 days for new subscriptions and renewals. Change of address: Send both old and new addresses to Playboy, 232 E. Ohio St., Chicago, Illinois 60611, and allow 30 days for change. Advertising: Howard W. Lederer, Advertising Director; Jules Kase, Associate Advertising Manager, 405 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y. 10022, MU 8-3030; Joseph Fall, Advertising Manager; Sherman Keats, Chicago Manager, 155 E. Ohio Street, Chicago, Ill. 60611, MI 2-1000. Detroit, Joseph Guenther, Manager, 2990 West Grand Boulevard, TR 5-7250; Los Angeles, Stanley L. Perkins, Manager, 8721 Beverly Boulevard, OL 2-8790; San Francisco, Robert E. Stephens, Manager, 110 Sutter Street, YU 2-7994; Southeastern Representative, Pirnie & Brown, 3108 Piedmont Road, N. E., Atlanta, GA. 30305, 233-6729.
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Review
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Playboy After Hours
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Camp, for the information of those few who may not yet be with it, no longer refers to the manner, manners or shacking up of homosexuals, any more than it does to that quaint institution, a place in the country where parents can get rid of their kids for the summer. The word camp has now been appropriated by the heterosexual cognoscenti--to describe anything that's in laughably, outlandishly, irredeemably bad taste; so bad, in fact, that it's good, and/or so far out that it's in. Wedgies, Victor Mature movies, Forest Lawn, Lawrence Welk and souvenir ashtrays in the shape of the Statue of Liberty, for example, are all considered camp, because their quintessential squareness makes them almost a parody of tastelessness. But there's more to it than that. As Susan Sontag, a professor of philosophy at Columbia University, wrote in an article on camp for Partisan Review a few months ago, "When something is just bad (rather than camp), it's often because it is too mediocre in its ambition....The hallmark of camp is the spirit of extravagance." Among the shining examples of camp she lists to illustrate her point are Aubrey Beardsley drawings, Tiffany lamps, the gory stories and headlines in the National Enquirer and stag movies "seen without lust." Another camp follower, writing for The New York Times Magazine, listed Barbara Stanwyck, Monopoly sets in Italian, stereoscopes and Busby Berkeley's movie musical Golddiggers of 1933 with Dick Powell and Ruby Keeler. In an aesthetic sense, it would be very "high" camp, as they say in the trade, to collect Brillo boxes and Campbell's soup cans as objets d'art; but a pop-art replica of either, because it was created as a conscious and deliberate satire of the real thing, and has earned the kiss of death of public acceptance, would be considered emphatically noncamp. Which is not to say that camp can't be intentional and premeditated or that something can't be camp if it's popular. Both Stanley Kubrick's nightmare comedy Dr. Strangelove and Terry Southern and Mason Hoffenberg's erotic farce Candy, for instance, rank high in the hierarchy of camp, though both were made with satiric malice aforethought and both were huge commercial successes.
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Review-Books
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Books
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Theodore White's 1964 version of The Making of the President (Atheneum) is rather like the campaign itself--wordy, predictable and laden with piety. As if in parody of stylistic contrast between John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, White's 1960 prose has gone slack. Rhetoric now passes for reportage. The new, unimproved White is capable of using the word "American" as a value-loaded adjective (as in "They made the wise American decision ..."); of calling a campaign speech "excellent" or "one of the worst" without bothering to tell why; and of converting simple propositions into rococo profundities (thus the purpose of the American space program is "to gain a lead in mankind's first primitive probing of the galaxies"). A considerable portion of the book is really a White Paper on the civil rights movement, which he correctly sees as a ubiquitous backdrop to the 1964 campaign, particularly during the long hot summer in Northern cities. But he fails to describe either the source of the heat or its intensity. Indeed, one senses that White covered the New York City civil rights movement not from Harlem but from City Hall, where he easily identified with the Establishment. He describes Mayor Wagner as a man "who has done as much for civil rights as any elected official of the United States"--a notion that will certainly astonish Negro leaders who are still trying to crack the mayor's opposition to the setting up of a civilian board to review charges of police brutality. Whenever White stops analyzing and starts reporting, he generates some of his 1960 fascination--particularly at the level of political gossip. We are fascinated, for example, to learn that it was by order of L. B. J. that the Kennedy memorial film shown at the Democratic convention contained no clips of Bobby. Beyond such tidbits, though, there is little that amuses and less that illuminates. One notable exception is White's account of the Goldwater-Rockefeller primaries, in which he establishes beyond reasonable doubt that divorce and remarriage were Rockefeller's undoing. Sitting in the gallery while Rockefeller addressed a hostile convention, White observed "a tall, thin, blonde woman, her fists upraised and shaking, screaming at the top of her lungs: 'You lousy lover, you lousy lover, you lousy lover!' "How did she know?
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Acts and Entertainments
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Mort Sahl once observed that Eddie Fisher really wanted to be Frank Sinatra, but that he'd have to be Peter Lawford first--because, cracked the comedian, there is no short cut to greatness. In the most flattering sense, something similar might be said of the "new"Nancy Wilson. She seems headed determinedly toward the summit that is Lena Horne by way of the knoll that is Diahann Carroll. Miss Wilson's sheer sex appeal cut like a laser beam through the male division of the celebrity-rich audience in her recent return to Los Angeles' popular Cocoanut Grove. On display was a glittering new act cooked up by arranger Luther Henderson and special-material writer Bob Hergert. Conceive, if you will, a tipsily freewheeling Beer Barrel Polka or a put-on medley of current Mersey-rock. This from Nancy? This, indeed. What's more, she sold it madly to a capacity crowd feverishly nibbling from her palm. The ballads, of course, were there. Who Can I Turn To, More and the nowadays seldom-sung If You Are But a Dream nicely paced Miss Wilson's hourlong opening show, but it was the "special" tunes that really sought--and found--acceptance. A medley, for example, of what Miss Wilson termed "The Emerging Songs--the new culture, y'know," turned into delightful spoof as she churned out--with appropriately frugish gyrations--A Hard Day's Night, I'm Telling You Now, Eight Days a Week and I Know a Place. For treatment of the material, Luther Henderson won plaudits. As chief implementer of devices musical, pianist Ronell Bright was outstanding--simpatico to every Wilson nuance, bend of phrase, note. At the drums, the singer's husband, Kenny Dennis, proved a true helpmeet. Down to her exquisite gowning, it is certainly a New Image for La Wilson. Onstage, Nancy is now fancy; her patter verges at times on the razor's edge of coyness. She remains, though, a songseller of powerful individuality and a super show-woman.
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Review-Theatre
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Theater
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The same disconcerting facts of financial life that have plagued the Broadway theater are now very much part of off-Broadway's existence. The hit-or-miss syndrome (a show is either a hit or a has been), endemic to the uptown stage, has wreaked havoc among even the most modest of downtown productions. Thus, the seeker after summer off-Broadway fare may find only three shows at his disposal.
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College Hall
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review
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Review-Dining-Drinking
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Dining-Drinking
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In this era of way-out, ultraexotic restaurants, it's a refreshing change of pace to get back to basics. Whyte's is admirably old-fashioned in its concepts of service and turn-of-the-century culinary standards. First established 57 years ago at 145 Fulton Street in downtown Gotham, it still stands there, surrounded by quick-lunch caravansaries, as a bastion of good eating. It is matched in almost every respect by an uptown branch at 344 West 57th Street. Ray Hopper, the owner of Whyte's, quietly, warmly, but firmly oversees the entire operation and steadfastly refuses to allow any touch of ungraciousness to plague either of his houses--uptown or down. The menu, which has been enjoyed by Presidents, is simple fare, with emphasis on the piscatorial. The Mulligatawny soup is indicative of how Mr. Hopper runs his place; it's made with a touch of curry that's conjured up on the premises from an old Indian recipe. Number-one best seller in recent years has been the Finnan Haddie--unsurpassed even in Boston. Frozen foods are anathema; all vegetables are garden fresh. The bread and rolls are a special delight, made in Whyte's own ovens, slow-baked over hot bricks. The pastries, also home-grown, are multitudinous and mouth-watering. The fare is so completely American--and we mean that in the best culinary sense of the word--that even the many curry dishes have been successfully naturalized. The only Continental touch is the well-stocked wine cellar, with recommendations capably made by an experienced and well-trained staff. Whyte's on Fulton Street is open Monday to Friday, for lunch and dinner, until 9 P.M. Uptown on 57th Street, where an outdoor garden is available for dining during the warm-weather months, it's open for lunch and dinner from Monday to Saturday, from 11 A.M. to 10 P.M.
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Inver House Distillers, Ltd.
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review
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Review-Films
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Movies
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Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines or How I Flew from London to Paris in 25 Hours and 11 Minutes has a terrific basic idea. The producers have built replicas of the airplanes of about 1905 (what a collection!), and the planes are actually flown, or half flown, in this comedy about an air race from L. to P. at that time. Robert Morley is an English newspaper publisher whose daughter is plane crazy and whose flying boyfriend convinces the old man to put up a big prize for the race. It happens; Japanese, Italian, French planes and pilots arrive, and a too-typical Imperial German Army team. There's an American, too, of course, who flips for the lord's lassie. If they had only stuck to the marvelous material that was there, producer Stan Margulies and director (also co-author) Ken Annakin would have had a fine film about those kookie crates and the nervy nuts who flew them. But they wanted to make it Big--which meant long enough to have an intermission and sell "hard tickets," which meant Todd-Ao as well as Deluxe color. So they stuffed it with two sets of running gags (Red Skelton and Irina Demick). both fabulously unfunny; and they dug up all the Keystone Cops tricks that used to be done with tin lizzies--only now it's with patchwork planes. Warmed-over gags took over from comic reality. Stuart Whitman (the Yank) and James Fox (the Englishman) are right as race and girl-rivals; Sarah Miles, the girl, is mediocre; Alberto Sordi, Jean-Pierre Cassel and Terry-Thomas kid themselves. But Gert (Goldfinger) Frobe is sharp as the Kaiser's colonel. Whatever the film's faults, go dig those crazy aircraft.
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200050_19650901_012158.xml
advertisement
54
54
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
B.W. Harris Manufacturing Company
Harris Manufacturing
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012159.xml
advertisement
55
55
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
United States Tobacco Company
Bowl Of Roses
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012160.xml
advertisement
56
56
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Cresco
Cresco
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012161.xml
advertisement
56
56
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Sportsman
Sportsman
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012162.xml
advertisement
57
57
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The American Wool Council
Wooletin
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012163.xml
advertisement
58
58
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robert Reis And Co.
Ries
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012164.xml
review
58
58,60,62,65
Review-Recorded Music
[no value]
Recordings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
This Is Damita Jo (Epic) and a fine thrush she is, with an outsized voice, astute phrasing and a swinging approach to a ditty. The ex-stalwart of Steve Gibson's Red Caps turns her attentions to such upbeat arabesques as Nobody Knows You when You're Down and Out, Bye Bye Love and Silver Dollar, with a fistful of ballads tossed in for good measure. Damita Jo is a joy.
200050_19650901_012165.xml
advertisement
59
59
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Smirnoff Vodka
Smirnoff Vodka
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012166.xml
advertisement
60
60
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
American Cyanamid Co
Creslan
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012167.xml
advertisement
61
61
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dexter
Dextr
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012168.xml
advertisement
63
63
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy Club News
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012169.xml
advertisement
64
64
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Wright
Wright
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012170.xml
advertisement
65
65
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Tackle
Spray
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012171.xml
advertisement
66
66
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A.T. Co.
igarette
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012172.xml
advertisement
67
67
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Merit Clothing Co.
Mert Clothing
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012173.xml
article
67
67,68
Reader QA
[no value]
The Playboy Advisor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A playmate of mine claims she can hear TV and radio programs through the fillings in her teeth. I'm beginning to wonder who she is listening to--me or Frank Sinatra. Is she putting me on?--S.P.C., Miami, Florida.
200050_19650901_012174.xml
advertisement
69
69
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AHM
AHM
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012175.xml
advertisement
70
70
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gordon's Dry Gin Co.Ltd.
Gin
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012176.xml
advertisement
71
71
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Prince Matchabelli
Lotion
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012177.xml
review
71
71
Review
[no value]
Playboy's International Datebook
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Patrick Chase
You can leave autumn leaves behind and jet-hop into spring by visiting some of the great resorts of South America this November. Many of them offer the triple treat of incomparable beaches; lavish after-dark facilities, combining gambling, dancing, entertainment and fine cuisine (not to mention a bevy of vacationing señoritas eager to be bowled over by un amigo norteamericano); and relatively easy access to S. A.'s most cosmopolitan cities. One of the smartest and liveliest areas is Argentina's Mar del Plata. Its 250 hotels include the luxurious Provincial (with the world's largest casino next door), and the better-than-average Horizontes, Hermitage, Nogaro and Royal. Additional diversion is provided by a good golf course and side trips to huge Argentine ranches at Chapadmalal and Ojo de Agua (a breeding center for world-famous Argentine race horses).
200050_19650901_012178.xml
advertisement
72
72
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Adler Company
Adler
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012179.xml
advertisement
73
73
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Parfums Corday, Inc.
Parfum
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012180.xml
article
73
73,74,76,78,79,80,81,82,84,86,87,88,188,189,190
Reader Discussion
[no value]
The Playboy Forum
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Rights Before Birth
200050_19650901_012181.xml
advertisement
74
74
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Asher
Asher
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012182.xml
advertisement
75
75
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Johnsonian
Johnsonian
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012183.xml
advertisement
76
76
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jaymar Ruby, Inc.
Jaymar Slack
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012184.xml
advertisement
77
77
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Pacific Trail
Pacific Trail
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012185.xml
advertisement
78
78
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Larus & Brother Company, Inc.
Edgeworth
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012186.xml
advertisement
78
78
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robinson-Bishop, Inc.
After Shave
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012187.xml
advertisement
79
79
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Hayward-Marum, Inc.
Marum
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012188.xml
advertisement
79
79
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playmate Jewelry
playmate Jewelry
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012189.xml
advertisement
80
80
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Brut
Brut
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012190.xml
advertisement
81
81
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Caper Casuals
Caper Casuals
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012191.xml
advertisement
82
82
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Lilac Vegetal
Pinaud
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012192.xml
advertisement
83
83
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Yamaha International Corporation
Yamaha
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012193.xml
advertisement
84
84
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Wings Shirt Co., Inc.
Shirt
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012194.xml
advertisement
85
85
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Piping Rock
Piping Rock
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012195.xml
advertisement
86
86
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Edgeworth Mills, Inc.
Edgeworth
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012196.xml
advertisement
87
87
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J & B
J&B
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012197.xml
advertisement
89
89
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Eagle Shirtmakers
Eagle Shirtmakers
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012198.xml
advertisement
90
90
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Botany 500
Botany 500
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012199.xml
article
91
91,92,94,96,98,99,100
Playboy Interview
[no value]
Peter O'Toole
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Our interviewer is the noted English drama critic Kenneth Tynan, whom readers will remember as the author of our September 1963 interview with Richard Burton, as well as of two Playboy articles: "Papa and the Playwright" (May 1964) and "Beat'e in the Bull Ring" (January 1965). Tynan writes of this month's charismatic subject:
200050_19650901_012200.xml
advertisement
93
93
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Interwoven
Interwoven
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012201.xml
advertisement
95
95
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R.J. Reynolods Tobacco Company
Cigarette
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012202.xml
advertisement
97
97
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Ronrico
Rum
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012203.xml
advertisement
99
99
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robert Bruce
Robert Bruce
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012204.xml
advertisement
101
101
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012205.xml
article
103
102,103,104,110,216,217,218,219,220,222,223,224,225
Feature
[no value]
Chariot of Fire
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Ray Russell
It Was a blooded stallion, but of metal and glass; gleaming and grave like a stallion; haughty as one; poised with dormant power and ready to spring into speed at a touch.
200050_19650901_012206.xml
article
105
105
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Erich Sokol
[no value]
200050_19650901_012207.xml
pictorial
107
106,107,108,109
Pictorial
[no value]
The Moreau Mystique
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Unlike Most of the cinematic world's current leading ladies, France's Jeanne Moreau, by her own admission, possesses few of the physical assets commonly considered prerequisites for projecting sex appeal. And yet La Moreau--as she was dubbed by the French press years ago--has been described by international film critics as "a slithering sensualist," "a cold, blasé beauty" and most of the other sexual superlatives normally reserved for only the most well-endowed filmic females. Eschewing any attempts to rank her among today's growing crop of celluloid sex goddesses ("Beautiful? Of course not. That's the whole point about me, isn't it?"), the 37-year-old Gallic femme fatale relies on her reputation as a versatile actress and out-spoken sensualist as the key to her charismatic charm. As she puts it, "When I am in love, it influences my pleasure in acting. Most people don't have the energy for passion, so they give up and go to the movies."
200050_19650901_012208.xml
article
111
111
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Dempsey
[no value]
200050_19650901_012209.xml
article
112
112,113,138,212,213,214,215,216
Feature
[no value]
An Unevenness of Blessings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Herbert Gold
During That Vivid, unresolved summer in 1941 before the United States entered the War, I took a job as counselor in a coeducational summer camp near Jackson, Michigan; in fact, near Grass Lake, Michigan; in fact, even closer to Napoleon, Michigan. It was a summer of busy high skies and tireless sun, with times of dust and times of ardent dog-days heat, and the flower of feeling opening. I was moved by green and weather, and, even more, by the fact that I knew I was being moved.
200050_19650901_012210.xml
article
114
114,115,116,236,238
Feature
[no value]
Chairmen of the Boards
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
To Anthropologists tracing the early history of mankind, there are several tellate signs that indicate when a primitive society becomes civilized. Two virtually infallible indications (after the discovery of fire and learning to get in out of the rain) are the fermenting of liquor and the invention of games to help man while away the time between hunts. The story of his attempt to amuse himself by pushing objects along a board-game layout is almost as old as the saga of man himself.
200050_19650901_012211.xml
article
117
117,118,180,181,182,183,184,185
Feature
[no value]
Call them Madam
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Irving Wallace
In late February of 1902, when Prince Henry of Prussia arrived in New York City to accept the yacht built for his brother, Kaiser Wilhelm II, then ruler of Germany, he was asked by members of the press what sight in America he would most like to see. Bored reporters waited for the expected official reply: the White House, Niagara Falls or the Grand Canyon. Instead, Prince Henry answered, "The sight in America I would most like to see? I would like to visit the Everleigh Club in Chicago."
200050_19650901_012212.xml
review
119
119
Buyers Guide
[no value]
The Lordly Chesterfield
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robert L. Green
Heading Out for an evening's entertainment of cocktails, dinner and discothèque calls for just the right wardrobe. Braced against the chill autumn air, our man on the town strikes the properly stylish note for such an occasion. Showing the way to where the action is, he wears a herringbone chesterfield that lives up to the elegant requirements of its famous namesake. This classic is undergoing yet another one of its periodic revivals, and Playboy delightedly predicts that this well-deserved renaissance will give the old sartorial war horse a first place in fashion for the coming season. Worn without a hat, it imparts a bit of dash to a business suit. Fitted out with the correct gloves and hat, it could be worn to a coronation and not be a miss. Seen here in the historically correct semifitted cut with concealed buttons and traditional velvet collar, the style is also available in brown, bottle green and light gray, by Varsity Town, $80.
200050_19650901_012213.xml
article
121
120,121,122,208,211,212
Feature
[no value]
The Ultimate Brunette
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Algis Budrys
Shortly After Hobbs had crossed the Indiana-Ohio border, headed east, his ammeter needle veered over to the left and lay implacably against the peg. His warning light came on a full, startling red. He cut his radio, his heater fans and finally his dash lights, but his headlights yellowed and when he shone his flashlight on the dark ammeter, the needle had not moved.
200050_19650901_012214.xml
article
123
123,256,257,258
Feature
[no value]
Horsing them in with Hemingway
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Arnold Gingrich
"Gingrich is a pretty keen fisherman," I said.
200050_19650901_012215.xml
article
124
124,125,126,127,128,258,259,260,261,262,264,265
Feature
[no value]
Playboy's Pigskin Preview
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Anson Mount
Football is the most dynamic and exciting spectator sport in America. Baseball is suffering from hardening of the arteries. Boxing is dead, a victim of bad scriptwriters and poorer actors. Wrestling has long since become pure show business. One of the things that gives college football such vitality is the element of change. The game is constantly being improved, new coaching techniques are being introduced, new offensive and defensive systems are being invented. Small schools grow big; traditional patsies acquire new power and prestige. Conversely, yesteryear's football factories are being cut down to size by drastically raised academic entrance requirements. The population explosion is vividly affecting college enrollment and, in self-defense, college administrators are rapidly upgrading scholastic standards.
200050_19650901_012216.xml
article
129
129
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Alden Erikson
[no value]
200050_19650901_012217.xml
pictorial
130
130,131,132-134,135
Playmate
[no value]
Patti Reynolds, Miss September, 1965
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Stan Malinowski
Man's Best Friends may be his dog, but the only four-legged love of September Playmate Patti Reynolds' life is a galloping gelding named Frankie. One of the Midwest's comeliest champion riders, Chicago-born Patti, who first graced Playboy's pages as one of The Bunnies of Chicago (August 1964), has spent the past year training her thoroughbred and trotting off with trophies and top honors at local horse shows in hopes of ultimately making the international equestrian scene. "Actually, there's no money in horse shows themselves," reports the charming ex cottontail, "but if you can take enough firsts and seconds against top notch competition, you'll usually wind up with an attractive offer or two to train one of the better-known breeders' stable of jumpers. After I'd worked as a Bunny for three years, I found I had enough cash saved up to buy my own horse and train him for a couple of seasons without having to worry about bill collectors' beating a path to my door. So I went out and bought Frankie, stabled him near Chicago's Lincoln Park, where we could work out every day, and started getting him ready for some of the regional meets. Within one year after his first public jump, Frankie had five gold cups and a drawerful of blue ribbons to his credit, and I had decided to spend the next few years of my life on the hoof." When our posting Playmate isn't busy putting her prancing pet through his paces or earning her next entry fee as a part-time model for a well-known local hair stylist, she spends most of her free time at Berlitz brushing up on her linguistic talents. "I've managed to acquire a working knowledge of Spanish and Italian so far," says Patti," and with a few more courses under my belt, I shouldn't have too much trouble trading tips with the European equestrian set. Next to horses, my second love is traveling, and if all goes well, I may be able to combine business with pleasure by working my way up into international riding competitions and a chance to clear the high hurdles in other parts of the world."
200050_19650901_012218.xml
article
136
136
Humor
[no value]
Playboy's Party Jokes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Have you heard about the man who never worried about his marriage, until he moved from New York to California and discovered that he still had the same milkman?
200050_19650901_012219.xml
article
137
137
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dink Siegel
[no value]
200050_19650901_012220.xml
article
139
139,152,164,194,196,198,199,200,207
Feature
[no value]
The Sex Institute
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Ernest Havemann
A Journalist who writes on a subject that in any way involves sex--as I have often had occasion to do in the past decade on teenage marriages, campus marriages, marriage problems in general and subsidiary issues such as homosexuality--would be a fool not to consult with the Institute for Sex Research, that famed institution founded in 1938 and incorporated in 1947 at Indiana University by the late great Dr. Alfred C. Kinsey. Being no fool (I hope), I have consulted regularly with the Institute. I often call my friends on the staff long distance, and many a time I have flown to Indianapolis and rented a car at the airport to pay a personal call at the Institute, which is on the university campus at Bloomington, an hout's drive to the south.
200050_19650901_012221.xml
article
141
140,141,142,143,144,145,146,234,235
Feature
[no value]
Back to Campus
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robert L. Green
A Problem that weights almost as heavily on today's college student as avoiding an economics class that starts before ten in the morning is deciding what to take back to campus with him for the coming scholastic year. Most college catalogs are stuffed with information on everything from lab fees to university drinking rules. But in none of these otherwise estimable publications can the curious student find a reliable guide to correct dress for on and off the campus.
200050_19650901_012222.xml
article
147
147,148,179,180
Feature
[no value]
The Muses of Ruin
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
William Pearson
Sammie Leads Me into his casino and tells me to choose my table. Play is desultory at all of them; it is the middle of the Las Vegas dinner hour. The combo is serenading us with twangy country music: The harmonica and fiddle go into a wild hoedown finale and the kazoo rides after their medley like a posse of hornets.
200050_19650901_012223.xml
article
149
149,150,168
Feature
[no value]
Through a Wineglass Hazily
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Edward B. Marks
In That still-Depression year of 1937 my salary as associate editor of the American Wine and Liquor Journal was a mere pittance, but attractive fringe benefits went with the job.
200050_19650901_012224.xml
article
151
151
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Interlandi
[no value]
200050_19650901_012225.xml
pictorial
153
153,154,155,156,157
Pictorial
[no value]
Saturday Night with Genghis Khan
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Although Genghis Khan's armies have never been credited with venturing west of the Crimea, the latest cinematic version of the mighty Mongol and his men raping and pillaging their way across the Asian plains finds them on location in West Germany. Starring Omar Sharif in the title role, Columbia Pictures' new version of Genghis Khan is another addition to the current filmic trend toward epidermal epics. It features the talented services of James Mason, Eli Wallach, Stephen Boyd, Françoise Dorleac, Telly Savalas and a host of winsome West German fashion models and actresses displaying their appealing all as comely Cantonese concubines who introduce the conquering Khan's warriors to the joys of communal bathing. Although the high jinkery pictured on these pages was cut from the final version of the film, our photographer has preserved what were some of the film's more memorable moments.
200050_19650901_012226.xml
article
158
158,159,160,228,229,230,232,233
Feature
[no value]
Afternoon in Andalusia
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robert Ruark
They Managed three different flamenco caves after dinner, which ended at 2:30 A.M. In each of the side-street cafés, faces lit when they entered, and the gypsies invariably said "íHola Señorita Barbará!" Or simply "íOlé Barbará!" In each of the places they visited, the guitarristas came immediately to the table to play what seemed to be carbon copies of her favorite songs. Twice, on loud demand, she got up to perform what appeared to Alec a very creditable flamenco, with loud hand clappings and frequent íOlés! and íAy, qué tias! from the performers as well as from the few dark men who rested against the bar and drank manzanilla. At the table, whole armies of bottles of manzanilla disappeared as the flamenco singers and guitarists produced private performances for Barbara, with glares of rebuke from the leader if a rival group started a song for another table in another part of the room.
200050_19650901_012227.xml
article
161
161,241,242,243
Feature
[no value]
Bye-Bye Stick Shift
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Ken W. Purdy
Since the 1890s, when it really was hard to do properly, skillful gear shifting has been the hallmark of the expert and the measure of the difference between the men and the boys. After all, a bright ape could be in taught to steer; in fact, bright apes have been taught to steer. Lindsay Schmidt, owner of an 1800-acre farm in Australia, uses a chimpanzee named Johnnie as a tractor driver, and has for years. Johnnie can steer a straight course over a plowed field, turn the tractor at the end of the furrow and keep this up all day. A couple of years ago a Southern highway patrolman was obliged to take into custody an ape who was going to Florida for the winter at the wheel of an Austin-Healey. His friend and owner was sitting beside him, apparently to read the road map.
200050_19650901_012228.xml
article
162
162
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Alberto Vargas
[no value]
200050_19650901_012229.xml
article
163
163
Ribald Classics
[no value]
Ribald Classic: The Reward of the Quick-Witted Miller
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A Youthful miller near Paris was enamored of a lovely young wench named Fabienne who lived in his neighborhood. To speak the truth, he was more loved by her than she by him, for he only pretended an attachment to her to obtain what favors he could. For her part, Fabienne was more than willing to be deceived. She loved the miller to such an extent that she neglected the usual coyness of her sex and sought him out at his chamber to take her pleasure.
200050_19650901_012230.xml
article
165
165,166,167
Humor
[no value]
Mother Goose
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gahan Wilson
[no value]
200050_19650901_012231.xml
advertisement
169
169
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Johnnie Walker
Whiskey
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012232.xml
article
170
170,171,172,173,174,175,176,177,244,246,248,250,251,252,253,255
Feature
[no value]
The History of Sex in Cinema
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Arthur Knight
Hollis Alpert
Part Five: Sex Stars of the Twenties
200050_19650901_012233.xml
article
178
178
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Doug Sneyd
[no value]
200050_19650901_012234.xml
article
180
180
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Brian Savage
[no value]
200050_19650901_012235.xml
article
181
181
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Donald Reilly
[no value]
200050_19650901_012236.xml
advertisement
183
183
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gordon's Dry Gin Co., Ltd.
Gin
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012237.xml
advertisement
185
185
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Cooper's Inc.
Jockey Menswear
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012238.xml
article
186
186
Profile
[no value]
Robert Shaw
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
In Recent Prepublication announcements of The Flag, third novel of a 37-year-old Englishman from Coleshill, Bucks, publishers Harcourt, Brace & World include a confounding group of photos. One shows a crewcut guy with jaw of stone and eyes of steel; another a rumpled, mustached middle-ager with a look not of steel but of irony; and another of a professorial graybeard. This variorum of false faces represents, respectively, Spectre's assassin in the Bond bombshell movie From Russia with Love, the cocky Irishman in The Luck of Ginger Coffey and the mock-mad scientist in Duerrenmatt's play The Physicists. The publishers, who upstage themselves further by billing Robert Shaw as actor and writer in that order, despite The Flag's rave reviews in the British press ("Quite beyond the capacity of other contemporary novelists"--Scotsman), provide a fourth photo of him minus the make-up, at home with Mary Ure. Up to his neck in conflicts between his careers, Shaw is slowly but surely coming around to the idea that for him the pen is mightier than the star on a dressing-room door. "Deep down I know that acting is inferior to writing," he says, and though his own acting is superlative, its purpose is in the main remunerative: "I act now to buy time as a writer." Shaw is currently buying time as Henry Fonda's costar in Warner Brothers' forthcoming epic Battle of the Bulge. "Six children [by two wives] need a lot of supporting. Sometimes I think it would be sensible to do a Fall of the Roman Empire sort of thing and live single-mindedly ever after at the typewriter." Why doesn't he? "Bad work as an actor affects my writing. It also," he adds with a grin, "affects my golf game, and I'm a lousy putter to begin with." That may be, but he's got a strong drive, and all of the approach shots.
200050_19650901_012239.xml
article
186
186,187
Profile
[no value]
Hallock Hoffman
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Purple Passages from plays by Edward Albee and poems by LeRoi Jones, uncensored interviews with dope pushers, prostitutes and homosexuals, critiques of U.S. foreign policy in Vietnam, classes in astronomy and the stock market, music from Bach to bluegrass--that's a random sampling of the divertisements afforded to devotees of FM by California's Pacifica Foundation, an audacious broadcasting enterprise headed by a 46-year-old ex-electronics manufacturer and English professor named Hallock Hoffman. Also, until recently, a Pacifica commentator on the institutions of democracy, Hoffman now does double duty as the foundation's president and as secretary-treasurer of educator Robert Hutchins' prestigious Fund for the Republic. Both esteemed and execrated for its progressive programing, Pacifica braved the rising tide of television in 1949 to pioneer the concept of subscription FM--which provides blessed relief from the distraction of commercials. It's underwritten mostly by taxdeductible contributions from 28,000 of its 1,300,000 listeners, who volunteer an annual average of $21 a piece for the privilege of savoring the rich intellectual and aesthetic smorgasbord served up 18 hours daily on its stations in Berkeley (KPFA and KPFB), Los Angeles (KPFK) and New York (WBAI). Considering the bland diet of jukebox AM and ho-hum FM fare offered these days, that's quite a bargain.
200050_19650901_012240.xml
article
187
187
Profile
[no value]
Don Adams
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
If TV soothsayers are correct in their predictions, Get Smart, a cloak-and-gagger videopus debuting on NBC this fall, should attract heavy laughs and weighty Nielsen ratings. As Maxwell Smart, Secret Agent 86, a bumbler of heroic proportions, comic Don Adams, who was a click as the hapless house dick Glick on The Bill Dana Show, hopes to achieve a new pinnacle of imperfection. His investigative gaucheries will now be international in scope as he locks horns (and Rube Goldbergish gadgetry) with the dread minions of Kaos, who are out to rule the you-know-what. This will be Adams' first fling as top banana of a TV show since he doffed his Marine greens after World War Two and set off in search of showbiz' elusive bitch goddess. A decade ago, the quiet, crewcut Adams came up with an onstage comedy character who has appeared in sundry incarnations since then--a brash know-it-all who convincingly and comically conveys the message that he knows nothing. Among his pet portraits of the last few years (during which he set some kind of a record for TV appearances as a guest jester--9 with Garry Moore, 20 with Steve Allen and a clutch with Jack Paar and Perry Como) were those of a relentless prosecuting attorney whose barside manner puts judge, jury and defendant to sleep, and an off-base umpire-school teacher determined to make the National Pastime a thing of the past. His house-defective Glick go-round and his impending trench-coated cutup are simply situation-comedy extensions of his stand-up self. When asked to compare his Get Smart characterization with his semiserious counterspy counterpart, Napoleon Solo, Don deftly deadpuns, "Anything he can do, I can do badder."
200050_19650901_012241.xml
article
189
189
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dennis Renault
[no value]
200050_19650901_012242.xml
advertisement
191
191
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy Products.
Playboy Products
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012243.xml
pictorial
192
192,193
Pictorial
[no value]
What's New, Teevee Jeebies?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Shel Silverstein
[no value]
200050_19650901_012244.xml
advertisement
195
195
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ACME Boot Company, Inc.
ACME Boot Company
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012245.xml
article
197
197
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Michael Ffolkes
[no value]
200050_19650901_012246.xml
article
198
198
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Herbert Goldberg
[no value]
200050_19650901_012247.xml
advertisement
199
199
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Creslan
Creslan
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012248.xml
article
200
200
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Buck Brown
[no value]
200050_19650901_012249.xml
advertisement
201
201
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Yardley
Yardley
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012250.xml
advertisement
202
202,203,204,205
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dickies
Dickies
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012251.xml
article
206
206
Cartoon
[no value]
Comic Strip
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Howard A. Schneider
[no value]
200050_19650901_012252.xml
advertisement
209
209
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Catalina
Catalina
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012253.xml
article
210
210
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Richard Taylor
[no value]
200050_19650901_012254.xml
article
212
212
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Donald Reilly
[no value]
200050_19650901_012255.xml
advertisement
213
213
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Shields, Inc.
Dante
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012256.xml
article
214
214
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dennis Renault
[no value]
200050_19650901_012257.xml
article
215
215
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Edward Frascino
[no value]
200050_19650901_012258.xml
article
216
216
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Brian Savage
[no value]
200050_19650901_012259.xml
advertisement
217
217
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Crosby Square
Shoe
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012260.xml
article
219
219
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Buck Brown
[no value]
200050_19650901_012261.xml
advertisement
221
221
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012262.xml
advertisement
222
222
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Rand Flipons
Rand Flipons
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012263.xml
advertisement
222
222
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy Products.
Playboy Products
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012264.xml
article
223
223
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Howard Shoemaker
[no value]
200050_19650901_012265.xml
advertisement
225
225
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Hardwick Clothes
Hardwick
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012266.xml
article
226
226,227
Cartoon
[no value]
Ich
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jules Feiffer
[no value]
200050_19650901_012267.xml
article
228
228
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Dempsey
[no value]
200050_19650901_012268.xml
advertisement
229
229
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Old Spice
Old Spice
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012269.xml
article
230
230
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Leo Garel
[no value]
200050_19650901_012270.xml
advertisement
231
231
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Wrangler
Wrangler
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012271.xml
article
232
232
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Francis Wilford-Smith
[no value]
200050_19650901_012272.xml
advertisement
233
233
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Sagner, Inc.
Clubman
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012273.xml
advertisement
234
234
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012274.xml
article
235
235
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Shel Silverstein
[no value]
200050_19650901_012275.xml
advertisement
237
237
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Hamm Brewing Co.
Hamm's
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012276.xml
article
238
238
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Bernard Handelsman
[no value]
200050_19650901_012277.xml
advertisement
239
239
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Wren Ltd.
Wren Ltd.
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012278.xml
article
240
240
Cartoon
[no value]
Comic Strip
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Claude Smith
[no value]
200050_19650901_012279.xml
advertisement
242
242
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Riviera
Riviera
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012280.xml
article
243
243
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gardner Rea
[no value]
200050_19650901_012281.xml
advertisement
245
245
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Falstaff Brewing Corp.
Beer
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012282.xml
article
247
247
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Don Madden
[no value]
200050_19650901_012283.xml
advertisement
249
249
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy Press
Playboy Press
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012284.xml
article
251
251
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Van Meter
[no value]
200050_19650901_012285.xml
advertisement
253
253
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dacron
Dacron
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012286.xml
article
254
254
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Interlandi
[no value]
200050_19650901_012287.xml
article
256
256
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Alden Erikson
[no value]
200050_19650901_012288.xml
article
258
258
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Art Krusz
[no value]
200050_19650901_012289.xml
article
263
263
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. Simms Campbell
[no value]
200050_19650901_012290.xml
article
264
264
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Sidney Harris
[no value]
200050_19650901_012291.xml
article
266
266
[no value]
[no value]
Next Month
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"The Great Comic-Book Heroes"--Superman, Batman, Captain Marvel And All The Rest Of That Marvelous Crew In A Nostalgic Account Of Whence They Came, Who Created Them, And Why They Occupied A Special Place Apart In The Fantasies Of Our Youth--By Jules Feiffer
200050_19650901_012292.xml
advertisement
C3
C3
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Masterpiece
Cigarette
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012293.xml
advertisement
C4
C4
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Haig
Whiskey
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012294.xml
advertisement
266
266
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy Reader Service
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19650901_012295.xml